Windows 7 Forums

Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: Desktop bricked after using RT Seven Lite, won't boot into BIOS

07 Sep 2016   #11
Eric3742

Windows 7 x64
 
 

Before connecting the PSU, do just connect the basic first.

MB, & 1 HDD with Windows OS, for start, as 300W is more than enough.

PSU connectors to MB is unique, should not mix, and do ensure it is slot in tight.
You are testing the MB and HDD and system.

Other HDD, optical drive, etc, best to avoid for the time being.
Otherwise you would not know which item is the cause of the failure.


Edit: Go to BIOS first, as to ensure it can see HDD and other setting. And do F10 to confirm the setting as you had being doing the jumper.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
07 Sep 2016   #12
Hashim

Windows 7 Ultimate 64-Bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Mellon Head View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Hashim View Post
Okay, I managed to get hold of a PSU, but its max output is 300W, as opposed to my current one's 450. Would it be safe to try with this one, or would I need to get hold of one with the same or higher output?
If your computer is the one in your specs you should be safe to try that 300W power supply just to see if it will boot. I wouldn't try overclocking your processor or heavy gaming though lol.

Just a reminder to remember to hook up the CPU power. It's usually a 4 or 8 pin connector beside the CPU. The corresponding wires on the PSU are usually labelled "P4" or "P5" with P4 being the most common. Make sure that particular one gets connected or the PC won't boot.
Quote:
Before connecting the PSU, do just connect the basic first.

MB, & 1 HDD with Windows OS, for start, as 300W is more than enough.

PSU connectors to MB is unique, should not mix, and do ensure it is slot in tight.
You are testing the MB and HDD and system.

Other HDD, optical drive, etc, best to avoid for the time being.
Otherwise you would not know which item is the cause of the failure.


Edit: Go to BIOS first, as to ensure it can see HDD and other setting. And do F10 to confirm the setting as you had being doing the jumper.
Okay, I finally installed the PSU, and the good news is you were right - the PSU was definitely the problem. I managed to get the computer up and running with the borrowed PSU, though I did have a worrying - though small - problem with Windows 7; namely, the timedate.cpl file had its file association reset, and restoring the computer to different restore points didn't fix it, so I had to manually set that file to open with the Control Panel. It's primarily worrying because it makes me question what else might have come undone. I considered a Repair Install, but don't really think it's worth the hassle right now, so instead I'm just running a virus/malware check. Even more worrying, the whining noise is persisting, coming from the secondary hard-drive, and the rest of the computer seems to be making more noise than usual. Odd.

Anyway, it looks like my main worry right now should be shopping for a new PSU. Can either of you recommend a cheap one? One of the first ones I came across was this:

Ace Black 120mm Fan 550W Fully Wired Efficient Power Supply - Ebuyer

I really can't afford to spend that much on it, so I'm wanting to stick within that sort of price range. Would that be sufficient for my comp? I do notice it does only have the one 12V rail.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Sep 2016   #13
Mellon Head

Win 7 Pro x64/Win 10 Pro x64 dual boot
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Hashim View Post
Anyway, it looks like my main worry right now should be shopping for a new PSU. Can any of you recommend a cheap one?
I realize that you are on a limited budget. That being said, the last thing that you should try to economize on is your PSU. It's the heart of your system. I looked at the site you linked and was able to find a couple of better PSUs at what I would consider a modest price. Now, I know that these are at least 2 to 3 times what you were looking at in terms of price, but I can't stress it enough: Don't cheap out on your PSU.

Anyway, here are a couple of PSUs that are better choices:

EVGA 430W Fully Wired 80+ Power Supply - Ebuyer

Corsair VS Series 550 Watt VS550 Power Supply - Ebuyer

Obviously, they are higher in price than the one you linked, but given that they are pretty good brands they should be solid performers. If there is anyway that you can scrape together enough money, one of those two would be a good bet.

And I'm concerned about this whining sound from your hard disk. Does it change with disk activity?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

07 Sep 2016   #14
profdlp

Main - Windows 7 Pro SP1 64-Bit; 2nd - Windows Server 2008 R2
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Mellon Head View Post
... Now, I know that these are at least 2 to 3 times what you were looking at in terms of price, but I can't stress it enough: Don't cheap out on your PSU...
Exactly.

I went the cheap PSU route many years ago. In the long run it will cost you much more, both in parts and in troubleshooting. Look at what you've been through the past few days with this problem. Are you ready for more phantom glitches on a regular basis due to unstable power? How about watching your whole MB go "poof" when something fries internally in the PSU? A slower CPU can be tolerated. A cheaper MB might have a few less features. A crummy PSU can and will do in the whole works.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
08 Sep 2016   #15
Eric3742

Windows 7 x64
 
 

Before getting the PSU, check the size and which side the connectors and main power connector are.

Although it is standard, it is better to check.
As some PSU have the wrong side, when i forgot to check, have to go for the exchange.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Mar 2017   #16
Hashim

Windows 7 Ultimate 64-Bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Mellon Head View Post
I realize that you are on a limited budget. That being said, the last thing that you should try to economize on is your PSU. It's the heart of your system. I looked at the site you linked and was able to find a couple of better PSUs at what I would consider a modest price. Now, I know that these are at least 2 to 3 times what you were looking at in terms of price, but I can't stress it enough: Don't cheap out on your PSU.

Anyway, here are a couple of PSUs that are better choices:

EVGA 430W Fully Wired 80+ Power Supply - Ebuyer

Corsair VS Series 550 Watt VS550 Power Supply - Ebuyer

Obviously, they are higher in price than the one you linked, but given that they are pretty good brands they should be solid performers. If there is anyway that you can scrape together enough money, one of those two would be a good bet.

And I'm concerned about this whining sound from your hard disk. Does it change with disk activity?
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by profdlp View Post
Exactly.

I went the cheap PSU route many years ago. In the long run it will cost you much more, both in parts and in troubleshooting. Look at what you've been through the past few days with this problem. Are you ready for more phantom glitches on a regular basis due to unstable power? How about watching your whole MB go "poof" when something fries internally in the PSU? A slower CPU can be tolerated. A cheaper MB might have a few less features. A crummy PSU can and will do in the whole works.
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Eric3742 View Post
Before getting the PSU, check the size and which side the connectors and main power connector are.

Although it is standard, it is better to check.
As some PSU have the wrong side, when i forgot to check, have to go for the exchange.
Okay, firstly, let me apologise for both never getting back to this thread and for resurrecting it now. You guys helped me out of a massive jam, and I can't express enough how much I appreciate it, even if it might not have looked that way. I was stressed as hell at the time, and just the thought of buying a new PSU filled me with so much anxiety that I kind of just forgot about the whole thing and this thread. Wilful ignorance, if you will, lol.

Until, of course, now. Inevitably, here I am a few months later needing to reconsider an investment into a PSU because I'm still running it on my relative's 300W one. According to Windows, I had a supposed HDD failure around 24 hours ago, at which point I posted to SuperUser (the StackExchange site) in a rush here and got back the response that the PSU could be the problem rather than the HDD. I then remembered this thread, and given that I'm still running on a cheap, underpowered PS despite all the advice given in this thread, it does make more sense to me to replace the PSU first and see if it helps.

So I'm back considering a PSU purchase, and I just wanted to confirm with you guys that I'm buying one that will fit in my case and work for my purposes. I looked closer at the Ebuyer link that Mellon Head linked to, and came across the Corsair VS450, which is a model down from the specific model that MH recommended, but also 10 cheaper, making it the ideal compromise between affordability and price for me.

The problem is that I don't know whether it's suitable for my case, because I'm unsure exactly how to judge a PSU and. The two things that worry me are the physical dimensions of it nd whether it'll fit in my case, and the amount of cables it has - mainly whether they'll be too much, or even too little of a certain type of cable.

Attached is my current, borrowed PSU - a PS-5301-08HP.

B
ecause it's so generic, searching the model number doesn't really tell me anything about its dimensions, and it's pretty tricky to physically count the amount and types of cables that it has. I basically just need someone to assure me that the chosen PSU will fit in my system. A quick primer on how to choose a PSU and the dimensions of them would also be massively appreciated. How do you guys usually go about choosing your PSUs? Do you use tools that make these things easier?

Thanks in advance, and sorry again.


Attached Thumbnails
Desktop bricked after using RT Seven Lite, won't boot into BIOS-img_5764.jpg  
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Mar 2017   #17
Mellon Head

Win 7 Pro x64/Win 10 Pro x64 dual boot
 
 

Hashim,

The best advice that I can give you on a PSU is that you have to pick one that will fit in your case properly. You are going to have to take out the one you have now and measure its dimensions. Length, width, & height. Compare it to the dimensions of the VS450 that you mentioned. I've reproduced them here:

Desktop bricked after using RT Seven Lite, won't boot into BIOS-dimensions.jpg

The VS450 should work out ok, as long as it fits in the case. It has the appropriate power connections, and more than likely has enough of them. New supplies are pretty good that way.

So, as long as the measurements are the same, or there is enough room where the old supply sits, you should be good to go.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
19 Mar 2017   #18
Hashim

Windows 7 Ultimate 64-Bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Mellon Head View Post
Hashim,

The best advice that I can give you on a PSU is that you have to pick one that will fit in your case properly. You are going to have to take out the one you have now and measure its dimensions. Length, width, & height. Compare it to the dimensions of the VS450 that you mentioned. I've reproduced them here:

Attachment 397083

The VS450 should work out ok, as long as it fits in the case. It has the appropriate power connections, and more than likely has enough of them. New supplies are pretty good that way.

So, as long as the measurements are the same, or there is enough room where the old supply sits, you should be good to go.
Okay, I finally took my current PSU out to measure it, and these are the specs I got:

Height: 14 cm
Width: 15 cm
Depth: 8.5 cm

...which seem like similar numbers to the VS450 but don't correspond to the same metrics, so I'm probably confused as to what exactly constitutes height, width, and depth.

I was measuring the PSU while standing as it would in the case, with the power connector facing the ground, the vents facing the inside of the case, and the label facing the right side of the case. Placed like that, I measured height from the top to the bottom of the PSU's front panel (where the vents are), width from vertically across the front panel, and depth from the front panel to the back. Are those the right way to measure those metrics, or am I getting it wrong somewhere?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
19 Mar 2017   #19
Ranger4

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit sp1
 
 

If you are going to buy a new PSU locally at a computer shop, take the old one with you so they can make sure all the connections & the dimensions are the same. Doing that will assure you that it will fit & if reconnected correctly it should work straight away.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
19 Mar 2017   #20
Hashim

Windows 7 Ultimate 64-Bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Ranger4 View Post
If you are going to buy a new PSU locally at a computer shop, take the old one with you so they can make sure all the connections & the dimensions are the same. Doing that will assure you that it will fit & if reconnected correctly it should work straight away.
Probably wasn't going to do that because it typically works out more expensive. I was going to buy from the Ebuyer link.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 Desktop bricked after using RT Seven Lite, won't boot into BIOS




Thread Tools




Similar help and support threads
Thread Forum
Desktop won't boot, gets stuck in BIOS
I just came back from a 10 day vacation, and when I tried turning on my desktop for the first time upon returning, it gets stuck on the BIOS screen for about a minute, then the screen goes black. I can't use any of the BIOS functions. The HDD activity light blinks a couple times right before it...
General Discussion
Brand new laptop is bricked! Please help!
Hi Windows community, I would greatly appreciate some advice for fixing my dead Lenova G505 notebook. I am downgrading the factory Windows 8 operating system to a new version of Windows 7. Through my attempts, I have rendered my notebook useless. I turn on the notebook and see the "Lenova"...
Installation & Setup
Windows 7 Stuck At BIOS Cannot Enter BIOS or Change Boot Media
My laptop has no problem before. Recently I try to install Windows XP. First attempt fail, so I change SATA at BIOS from AHCI to Compatible, success. However the partition that I want to install*Windows XP to is not available.* So just to test I choose my Windows 7 partition. Since it want to...
General Discussion
Dv6 Semi-bricked, Corrupted BIOS
Comp Information: HP Pavilion Dv6z-1100se Artist Edition Notebook (2009) AMD Processor Duel Core Windows 7 64-bit About 5 days ago I started up my computer in the morning and everything was working fine. I shut down the laptop, packed it up and took a 3 hour car ride back to my place. I...
General Discussion
GPU Bios showing up before Mobo BIOS (slowing boot up time)
So recently I purchased a Galaxy GTX 460 768MB video card. I was previously using a BFG Tech GTX 275. When I first installed the GPU I was on an ASUS P5B Deluxe WiFI Edition motherboard. I am now on an ASRock P64 Extreme4 motherboard. I mention the old mobo because the problem has been the same...
Graphic Cards


Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:37.
Twitter Facebook Google+ Seven Forums iOS App Seven Forums Android App