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Windows 7: BOOTMGR is on wrong HDD / System Repair disk not compatible

3 Weeks Ago   #1
RoyReddy

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 
BOOTMGR is on wrong HDD / System Repair disk not compatible

I have read a number of the 'not compatible' threads and tried a few solutions without resolve.
My goal is to boot without the Original boot drive and avoid reinstall of All the programs.

Bkgrnd
----
I upgraded my boot drive
from Original(2tb) Disk1 (D:)
to New(4tb). Disk3 (C:)
The original is a ticking problem. It was reporting Smart Errors as well as small in space.
I thought I had all of the contents and format/Install on the new drive but the system will not boot without the Original drive connected. Without it the Original connected "BOOTMGR missing" on boot.

> Diskmanager screen capture attached

System Info reports;
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit Service Pack 1
Boot Device: \Device\HarddiskVolume2
System Device: \Device\HarddiskVolume6


Tried
---------
* Boot from Win7_CD / Repair. error "the version of System Restore Options is not compatible with ...
* EasyRE without success. error "partition does not contain valid Windows installation ...

Other
----- @Vineet Garg
the solution in the thread
System Repair disk not compatible with this version of Windows
seems so close to my issue, I am inspired to post and seek your direction and assistance.

thanks in advance Roy




Attached Thumbnails
BOOTMGR is on wrong HDD / System Repair disk not compatible-hdd-diskmanager-screen.png  
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
3 Weeks Ago   #2
samuria

win 8 32 bit
 
 

Welcome to the forum. It's best practice to have c as disk 0 swap the cables. The other problems are you have a lot of drives set as active which will confuse the issue. You should be able to use free partition software to move c to the right enough to then copy the boot partition before it. It should then boot if not you will have to use bcedit to redo. Chances are your trying to do a repair with a disk at a different service pack than the PC
My System SpecsSystem Spec
3 Weeks Ago   #3
RolandJS

Windows 7 Professional 64-bit
 
 

Also, get rid of all active flags except for the System Reserved partition, or, if no SysRes, the C partition - the OS partition - should be marked active.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

3 Weeks Ago   #4
RoyReddy

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

& before reading these replies I tried this EASYBCD solution
Bootmgr - Move to C:\ with EasyBCD

and it was not a success.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
2 Weeks Ago   #5
dg1261

Windows 7/8.1/10 multiboot
 
 

You have a couple of issues, but multiple active flags is not one of them. Each disk can have one active partition, and there is absolutely no harm in that, so don't let that distract you. The active partition only comes into play when that disk is chosen as the boot disk by the BIOS. If an active partition's disk is not chosen as the boot disk, that disk's active flag is ignored.

In fact, that is a common method of multi-booting, in which different OSes are installed on different disks, and the BIOS one-time boot menu is used to select which disk (and therefore, which OS) to boot. Each disk must have its own active partition to do that. Whether you multi-boot is not my point, the point is the active flags are allowed.

It's not clear how you got to where you are now ... it kind of looks like Disk 1 used to be both your System and Boot disk -- i.e., what is now partition D: might have been where Windows used to be? But partition D: is now empty! Or was Windows (and still is?) on one of the other disks?

Whatever, the first partition on Disk 1 was your startup partition (aka, "System") and the OS partition (aka, "Boot") was elsewhere. You moved the OS partition but still have the same startup partition. That's why you can't boot if Disk 1 is removed. The proper procedure would have been to also move the startup partition to the new disk.

Samuria has suggested you slide the C: partition over slightly to make enough room to copy the startup partition to the same disk as the C: partition. That should work.

Another option is to copy the startup partition's files to C: and let C: do double-duty as both the "System" and "Boot" partitions.

However, before you get ahead of yourself, there's a larger issue you'll need to resolve first: GPT vs MBR.

It appears Disk 3 is using a MBR-style (vs. GPT-style) partition table. You can confirm by right-clicking the "Disk 3" tile (just left of "C:" in the disk layout map), selecting "Properties", "Volumes" tab, and reading the "Partition style". It will be either MBR or GPT.

This will make a huge difference.

If it's MBR, you will not be able to make use of all the extra space on that 4TB disk. MBR layouts are limited to a maximum of 2TB. You indicated one of the incentives for the new disk was the old disk was "small in space", so if you stick to MBR (as your old disk was) you will not gain the advantage of having bought a larger hard disk. You might have just as well bought another 2TB disk.

If it's GPT, you can make use of the entire 4TB, but you may need to reinstall Windows in UEFI mode. If Windows 7 is installed in MBR (aka, "Legacy") mode it is not a straightforward process to convert it to UEFI mode. (I think it can be done, but I haven't done it and don't know how difficult it may be. Perhaps someone else has suggestions, if that's the course you choose to follow.)

So as I see it, before choosing a course of action you first have to decide:
  1. Repair Win7 as a MBR/Legacy boot and abandon the rest of the disk space, or
  2. Reinstall Win7 in UEFI boot mode.
Not an easy choice.

(BTW, I'm assuming your motherboard supports UEFI mode ... but most modern computers do, so it's probably a safe assumption.)
My System SpecsSystem Spec
2 Weeks Ago   #6
Vineet Garg

Windows 7 Ultimate x32 With Sp1 + Vista Ultimate x32 with Sp1 & Sp2 !!
 
 

Hi @RoyReddy & all,
Greets,

1. Download an untouched M$ Installation media of Win 7 SP 1 x64 ISO .
For eg.
Direct Download Link for Win 7 Home Premium SP 1 x64

2. Make an MBR+BIOS Installation media with Rufus
Rufus Guide : Point 2
The only difference is that you have to make MBR+BIOS. So, you have to "Choose Partition scheme as MBR & Target system as BIOS ( or UEFI-CSM )

3. You have desktop. Can you disconnect /switch off / Power off the disks 0 , 1 & 2 ? ( The C: is on the disk 3 as per the disk management snap )

4. Leave only two disks connected : Pen Drive Installation media & the disk 3.
Eject & unplug all the other disks ( Internal & External ), CD-DVD, external memory cards, other pen drives, etc.

5. Launch the One time boot menu & boot into the pen drive.

6. Perform Startup Repair for three times CONSECUTIVELY!.

7. Now you should be able to boot in Disk 3 independently.

Anything else ?

There are also other ways. First try this & report.

Thanks & Regards. ...
My System SpecsSystem Spec
2 Weeks Ago   #7
RoyReddy

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

thanks for the insights and straight-forward answers here.
It is MBR.
I am very keen not to mess up the machine and so I can accept the 2G unused space in exchange for a more safe-reliable repair.

There are a wide number of Partition manager software choices. If only it was simple.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by dg1261 View Post
You have a couple of issues, but multiple active flags is not one of them. Each disk can have one active partition, and there is absolutely no harm in that, so don't let that distract you. The active partition only comes into play when that disk is chosen as the boot disk by the BIOS. If an active partition's disk is not chosen as the boot disk, that disk's active flag is ignored.

In fact, that is a common method of multi-booting, in which different OSes are installed on different disks, and the BIOS one-time boot menu is used to select which disk (and therefore, which OS) to boot. Each disk must have its own active partition to do that. Whether you multi-boot is not my point, the point is the active flags are allowed.

It's not clear how you got to where you are now ... it kind of looks like Disk 1 used to be both your System and Boot disk -- i.e., what is now partition D: might have been where Windows used to be? But partition D: is now empty! Or was Windows (and still is?) on one of the other disks?

Whatever, the first partition on Disk 1 was your startup partition (aka, "System") and the OS partition (aka, "Boot") was elsewhere. You moved the OS partition but still have the same startup partition. That's why you can't boot if Disk 1 is removed. The proper procedure would have been to also move the startup partition to the new disk.

Samuria has suggested you slide the C: partition over slightly to make enough room to copy the startup partition to the same disk as the C: partition. That should work.

Another option is to copy the startup partition's files to C: and let C: do double-duty as both the "System" and "Boot" partitions.

However, before you get ahead of yourself, there's a larger issue you'll need to resolve first: GPT vs MBR.

It appears Disk 3 is using a MBR-style (vs. GPT-style) partition table. You can confirm by right-clicking the "Disk 3" tile (just left of "C:" in the disk layout map), selecting "Properties", "Volumes" tab, and reading the "Partition style". It will be either MBR or GPT.

This will make a huge difference.

If it's MBR, you will not be able to make use of all the extra space on that 4TB disk. MBR layouts are limited to a maximum of 2TB. You indicated one of the incentives for the new disk was the old disk was "small in space", so if you stick to MBR (as your old disk was) you will not gain the advantage of having bought a larger hard disk. You might have just as well bought another 2TB disk.

If it's GPT, you can make use of the entire 4TB, but you may need to reinstall Windows in UEFI mode. If Windows 7 is installed in MBR (aka, "Legacy") mode it is not a straightforward process to convert it to UEFI mode. (I think it can be done, but I haven't done it and don't know how difficult it may be. Perhaps someone else has suggestions, if that's the course you choose to follow.)

So as I see it, before choosing a course of action you first have to decide:
  1. Repair Win7 as a MBR/Legacy boot and abandon the rest of the disk space, or
  2. Reinstall Win7 in UEFI boot mode.
Not an easy choice.

(BTW, I'm assuming your motherboard supports UEFI mode ... but most modern computers do, so it's probably a safe assumption.)
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
2 Weeks Ago   #8
RoyReddy

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

Thanks RolandJS
I looked in Disk Manager and cannot determine where to change the Active Flag.
This leads me to assume that I need a more complete Partition Manager software tool.

With Several Drives marked active.. is that why there are so many drives in the BIOS Setup choices for Boot Drive Priority? Is there a connection to this
thanks

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by RolandJS View Post
Also, get rid of all active flags except for the System Reserved partition, or, if no SysRes, the C partition - the OS partition - should be marked active.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
2 Weeks Ago   #9
RoyReddy

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

Thanks much for your insight and direction.
My progress report so far.
#1 - done
#2 - done, slick and easy!
then I tried to boot from the USB drive as a test to see whether the machine would.
& it is not so I am wrestling with that. I tried without Disk2, the current boot drive connected.
Next I will try disconnecting all of the Drive as listed in step 3 before boot. I really would prefer to use USB.
I may need to just use the CD-ROm drive

Question about #3
the statement is
[QUOTE=
3. You have desktop.
...[/QUOTE]
Are you describing the DISK3 Partition as holding the Desktop?
If it holds the Desktop then is it a complete entity? So when I fix the Boot partition the Desktop is intact?

I don't expect you to write a long answer, Maybe there is a reference you can suggest for me to read to learn more.

Thanks RrR


Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Vineet Garg View Post
Hi @RoyReddy & all,
Greets,

1. Download an untouched M$ Installation media of Win 7 SP 1 x64 ISO .
For eg.
Direct Download Link for Win 7 Home Premium SP 1 x64

2. Make an MBR+BIOS Installation media with Rufus
Rufus Guide : Point 2
The only difference is that you have to make MBR+BIOS. So, you have to "Choose Partition scheme as MBR & Target system as BIOS ( or UEFI-CSM )

3. You have desktop. Can you disconnect /switch off / Power off the disks 0 , 1 & 2 ? ( The C: is on the disk 3 as per the disk management snap )

4. Leave only two disks connected : Pen Drive Installation media & the disk 3.
Eject & unplug all the other disks ( Internal & External ), CD-DVD, external memory cards, other pen drives, etc.

5. Launch the One time boot menu & boot into the pen drive.

6. Perform Startup Repair for three times CONSECUTIVELY!.

7. Now you should be able to boot in Disk 3 independently.

Anything else ?

There are also other ways. First try this & report.

Thanks & Regards. ...
My System SpecsSystem Spec
2 Weeks Ago   #10
Vineet Garg

Windows 7 Ultimate x32 With Sp1 + Vista Ultimate x32 with Sp1 & Sp2 !!
 
 

@RoyReddy : Greets,

1.The basic questions to answer are : Why are you not able to boot into Win 7 USB installation media ? What is the exact situation ? How far you get with that ? Do you still get ''Not Compatible'' message ? Have you tried other USB ports ?

2. Forgot to mention that an untouched M$ Windows 7 sp 1 ISO will not support booting from USB 3 ports. You should try booting from an USB 2 port. You may use USB 3 pen drives but only try to boot from USB 2.0 ports.

3. Whether disks are connected or not, you will be always able to boot into the pen drive. You can launch One Time Boot menu & select the pen drive to boot from. Are you able to launch One Time Boot Menu at start & choose the pen drive to boot from ?
I asked you to disconnect other drives only to make a successful Startup Repair from the pen drive on the disk 3. That is to make it bootable independently. Disk detaching is required to write boot data properly to the disk 3 by Startup Repair & it has nothing to do with booting in the USB installation media.

4. You can always boot from a DVD If you can't boot from the pen drive.

5. Leave the Desktop question. It was really confusing.

Let me know.

Thanks & Regards. ...

ADD :

6. You may also try using USB7ice.exe to make a bootable USB Installation Media.

Download : USB7ice

BOOTMGR is on wrong HDD / System Repair disk not compatible-capture.png

Follow from top to bottom & let the things finish. for eg.

BOOTMGR is on wrong HDD / System Repair disk not compatible-usb7ice-done.png


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 BOOTMGR is on wrong HDD / System Repair disk not compatible




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