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Windows 7: Multiple partitions?

06 Apr 2010   #11
ignatzatsonic

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium SP1, 64-bit
 
 

Placing backups on D is better than not having any backups at all, but it won't help you at all if your drive fails. In that case, you would lose everything on C and D, including your backups.

The preferred backup strategy is to use a second hard drive, either internal or external.

You apparently have a 1 TB drive. I would shrink C to perhaps 60 or 80 GB and let the D partition take the entire remaining space on the drive--somewhere around 850 GB.

I would put all my data on D, none on C.

I would then backup D to a second hard drive.

Alternatively, you could expand C to take the entire drive and delete D. If you did that, you would keep all data on C and then back up just your data folders to a second drive.

Many people on this forum like to put their data on a separate partition, but most computer users in general just use a single C partition. And, unfortunately, most of them don't do any backup at all.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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06 Apr 2010   #12
Bare Foot Kid
Microsoft MVP

W 7 64-bit Ultimate
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ignatzatsonic View Post
Placing backups on D is better than not having any backups at all, but it won't help you at all if your drive fails. In that case, you would lose everything on C and D, including your backups.

The preferred backup strategy is to use a second hard drive, either internal or external.

Thanks mate, I meant to add that but got sidetracked.

Here is another useful tutorial.

Backup User and System Files
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Apr 2010   #13
ahstanford

Windows 7 Home Premium
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ignatzatsonic View Post
You apparently have a 1 TB drive. I would shrink C to perhaps 60 or 80 GB and let the D partition take the entire remaining space on the drive--somewhere around 850 GB.

I would put all my data on D, none on C.

I would then backup D to a second hard drive.
How would I go about shrinking the C partition to 60 or 80 GB?

Also, should I leave that 8GB partition sitting there, or?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

06 Apr 2010   #14
SIW2

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Vista x64 / 7 X64
 
 

Leave the 8gb as it is. You will need that to do a restore of win 7 - that will restore to factory condition - exactly as the day you got the pc.

You might want to do that for a complete fresh start , or when you sell the pc for example, or if you haven't made your own backup images.

Your own backup images of the partitions will restore to the exact state at the time you made the image - better, obviously.

I very strongly recommend you use a 3rd party app. instead of Windows Backup for your partition imaging.

There are some good free ones around.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Apr 2010   #15
546 Inspiron

Windows 7 home premium with 64 bit
 
 

Backing up to a partition is not much of a backup. Keep 95% of your 1TB C drive usable and get an ext drive for backups.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Apr 2010   #16
ahstanford

Windows 7 Home Premium
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by SIW2 View Post
Leave the 8gb as it is. You will need that to do a restore of win 7 - that will restore to factory condition - exactly as the day you got the pc.

You might want to do that for a complete fresh start, or when you sell the pc for example, or if you haven't made your own backup images.

Your own backup images of the partitions will restore to the exact state at the time you made the image - better, obviously.
Why does a restore require an 8GB partition?

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by SIW2 View Post
I very strongly recommend you use a 3rd party app. instead of Windows Backup for your partition imaging.

There are some good free ones around.
Such as?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Apr 2010   #17
Jonathan_King

Windows 7 Professional x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ahstanford View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by SIW2 View Post
Leave the 8gb as it is. You will need that to do a restore of win 7 - that will restore to factory condition - exactly as the day you got the pc.

You might want to do that for a complete fresh start, or when you sell the pc for example, or if you haven't made your own backup images.

Your own backup images of the partitions will restore to the exact state at the time you made the image - better, obviously.
Why does a restore require an 8GB partition?

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by SIW2 View Post
I very strongly recommend you use a 3rd party app. instead of Windows Backup for your partition imaging.

There are some good free ones around.
Such as?
SIW is referring to programs such as Macrium Reflect and Acronis TrueImage.

The 8GB partition has the original data on it; that is what you restore from.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Apr 2010   #18
ahstanford

Windows 7 Home Premium
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Jonathan_King View Post
SIW is referring to programs such as Macrium Reflect and Acronis TrueImage.
I'll take a look at those - thank you.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Jonathan_King View Post
The 8GB partition has the original data on it; that is what you restore from.
It currently shows to be empty, though? It shows 8GB free space in Disk Management.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Apr 2010   #19
whs
Microsoft MVP

Vista, Windows7, Mint Mate, Zorin, Windows 8
 
 

Here is a short tutorial and a comprehensive video tutorial about Macrium - in case you want to try that.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Apr 2010   #20
ignatzatsonic

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium SP1, 64-bit
 
 

You should be able to shrink C to 60 GB and expand D to about 850 GB by using Windows 7 disk management, without using a third party application. You may have to temporarily delete D to do this, then shrink C, then make a new D.

You would then have partitions of 8 GB, 60 GB, and 850 GB, reading from left to right in Disk Management.

If you buy a second hard drive, it would show up on a separate line within Disk Management.

You could then use Macrium or any other imaging application to make images of C, D, or both and place them on the new drive.

You could also use any of several third party applications to make separate backups of your data partition (D) WITHOUT using an image.

You will hear different ideas about backup strategies, but I have always felt it is good practice to make data backups without imaging. Personal data is typically the most valuable information on a PC and I don't like to have to rely on imaging as a backup because images can fail. If your operating system image of C fails, you haven't lost anything but the time needed to restore it by other means, but if your personal data (D) is backed up only within an image, you may lose it forever if you can't get at the image for whatever reason.

I'm not sure why your 8 GB partition shows as 100% free space. If it is in fact empty, then it is pointless and a candidate for deletion also. Typically, those small partitions contain data usable to restore your PC to factory specifications. You need to further investigate what, if anything, is truly in that partition.

Since the 8 GB partition is to the left of C in Disk Management, you may have to use a third party tool to get rid of it. Alternatively, you could simply ignore it since it is only 8 GB.

Do you have a bona fide Windows installation disc? If not, what system or restoration discs did Acer provide?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Multiple partitions?




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