Windows 7 Forums
Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: Will buying/changing graphics card improve my CPU performance subscore

21 Jan 2018   #1
Goji73

Windows 7 64bit
 
 
Will buying/changing graphics card improve my CPU performance subscore

Hello. I have a question for to ask for anyone who may know the answer to it because I am stumped:

I have recently begun working with a 3D animation program for video projects, but I recently noticed that when working on some of the more advanced effects for the program, my computer will "black out" for a moment and turn back on, stating the following:

(NOTE: "nvlddmkm" is not my disk driver, this is just an example I found on Google of the problem I am dealing with...)

Depending on the effect, this problem can last for a few seconds, to ultimately freezing my entire computer. It is because of this inconvenience that I can do very little with my program and projects. Therefore, I have come here wondering what my available options are. I read that a primary cause to this performance issue could be because there's not enough output in "gaming graphics" to let the program run properly. if it helps, here are a few screencaps of my computer's graphics card info:





With this information present, is there any advice anyone can offer on how to improve the "gaming graphics" on my CPU's performance? I have contemplated on buying a new graphics card altogether, but I don't know if this will solve the problem or not. Plus given the prices I have seen graphics cards go for, I don't want to drop that much money just yet, until I know for certain that it will fix the problem.

I bought my Windows 7 back in 2010, and I have never had to get a new graphics card before. I have once had to buy a new hard drive, but that's about it.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
21 Jan 2018   #2
Mellon Head

Win 7 Pro x64/Win 10 Pro x64 dual boot
 
 

It would be nice to know what kind of PC this is. Brand and model number would help and whether or not it's a laptop.

If it is a laptop, you won't be able to change graphics cards at all. If it's a standard desktop PC, you would be well advised to buy even a low end graphics card. It will out perform the onboard graphics that you have now. (You don't actually have a graphics card right now, you have motherboard integrated graphics and they are woefully under performing for you.)

But I can't really make any suggestions unless you can tell us what kind of a computer this is that we're talking about, please.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
21 Jan 2018   #3
torchwood

W7 home premium 32bit/W7HP 64bit/w10 tp insider ring
 
 

Have you been updating the drivers??

This is an older chipset no longer supported, and its showing wddm 1.1 there are later versions
note this only relates to the base chipset not neccessarily your graphics card

Asus Accentio??, go to homepage update drivers including bios
then Intel download run this tool
https://downloadmirror.intel.com/243...0Installer.exe
update as required
Now reboot

before checking for the Nvidea drivers if installed

note
older comps will not neccessarily support the intensive loads required for 3d animation
(aboslute minimum 2 cores)



Roy.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

22 Jan 2018   #4
RoasterMen

Windows 7 Home Premium 64-BIT
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Mellon Head View Post
It would be nice to know what kind of PC this is. Brand and model number would help and whether or not it's a laptop.

If it is a laptop, you won't be able to change graphics cards at all. If it's a standard desktop PC, you would be well advised to buy even a low end graphics card. It will out perform the onboard graphics that you have now. (You don't actually have a graphics card right now, you have motherboard integrated graphics and they are woefully under performing for you.)

But I can't really make any suggestions unless you can tell us what kind of a computer this is that we're talking about, please.
It's a desktop according to dxdiag. It should say "mobile" in the GPU name which it didn't.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Jan 2018   #5
mrjimphelps

Linux Mint 18.2 xfce 64-bit (VMWare host) / Windows 8.1 Pro 32-bit (VMWare guest)
 
 

Since you are running graphic intensive programs, if you have a desktop computer, a graphics card with lots of memory would definitely help. Lots of graphics cards have 2 GB of RAM. I would go higher than that, at least 4 GB. And make sure you get a 64-bit card - it will be faster than a 32-bit card.

It would also be good to have lots of system memory, minimum 8 GB, but 16 GB would be better, because your video programs will also consume system memory.

Having an SSD rather than a traditional hard drive will help a lot when you are opening and saving graphics files, but it won't help when you are actually working on the files.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Jan 2018   #6
Goji73

Windows 7 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Mellon Head View Post
It would be nice to know what kind of PC this is. Brand and model number would help and whether or not it's a laptop.

If it is a laptop, you won't be able to change graphics cards at all. If it's a standard desktop PC, you would be well advised to buy even a low end graphics card. It will out perform the onboard graphics that you have now. (You don't actually have a graphics card right now, you have motherboard integrated graphics and they are woefully under performing for you.)

But I can't really make any suggestions unless you can tell us what kind of a computer this is that we're talking about, please.
It is an ASUS CM5571

A Desktop Windows 7 Computer.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
Since you are running graphic intensive programs, if you have a desktop computer, a graphics card with lots of memory would definitely help. Lots of graphics cards have 2 GB of RAM. I would go higher than that, at least 4 GB. And make sure you get a 64-bit card - it will be faster than a 32-bit card.

It would also be good to have lots of system memory, minimum 8 GB, but 16 GB would be better, because your video programs will also consume system memory.

Having an SSD rather than a traditional hard drive will help a lot when you are opening and saving graphics files, but it won't help when you are actually working on the files.
Out of curiosity, do you have any recommendations for graphics cards that don't cost more than $300? The cheapest price for 4GB that I've seen (so far) usually come to about $165. When I see some cards that pass $300, it discourages me into believing that I'd be better off just getting a Windows 10 altogether (which I don't have the money for)

By "system memory," do you mean get more RAM too? I have 6GB of RAM installed.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Jan 2018   #7
Layback Bear

Windows 10 Pro. 64/ version 1709 Windows 7 Pro/64
 
 

By the time one upgrades that system for "3D" with SSD, Video card and probably a power supply, ram, you have almost built a new computer.

That is the direction I would recommend.
Spending large amounts of money on that old system, to me is a waste of money, if one wants to do "3D". It takes a lot of computer to do "3D" in any reasonable fashion.

Jack
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 Jan 2018   #8
mrjimphelps

Linux Mint 18.2 xfce 64-bit (VMWare host) / Windows 8.1 Pro 32-bit (VMWare guest)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Goji73 View Post
It is an ASUS CM5571

A Desktop Windows 7 Computer.



Out of curiosity, do you have any recommendations for graphics cards that don't cost more than $300? The cheapest price for 4GB that I've seen (so far) usually come to about $165. When I see some cards that pass $300, it discourages me into believing that I'd be better off just getting a Windows 10 altogether (which I don't have the money for)

By "system memory," do you mean get more RAM too? I have 6GB of RAM installed.
I don't know that much about the different video cards; just make sure it has at least 4 GB of RAM, that it is 64-bit, and that it will go in your computer (make sure it will fit into the type of slots that your motherboard has).

A good video card will cost you the same, whether you have a new computer or one that is a few years old. You will still need to buy the card for a new computer; it won't come with a good card, unless you pay a lot for the computer.

I'm hesitant to recommend Windows 10, because while your card works today, it might not work tomorrow, because Microsoft might install an update which will conflict with your card.

By "system memory", I mean RAM. 6 GB is enough for normal computer usage, but not for what you are doing. 8 GB is the minimum for what you are doing; the more you go above 8, the better. But you don't need to go above 16 GB.

To save money, start with a cheap video card that has 4 GB of RAM. That may be enough to solve the problem you posted about at the top of this thread. If that doesn't solve it, then add some RAM to your computer.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 Will buying/changing graphics card improve my CPU performance subscore




Thread Tools




Similar help and support threads
Thread Forum
A new grahpics card vs a new HD (maybe SSD) to improve performance
I've just installed Windows 7 64 bit, updated all drivers, downloaded all Windows updates, but still, the speed and performance differences for opening and using high graphic manipulation programs, which I use quite often (especially Photoshop), and for opening and browsing through folders with a...
Hardware & Devices
Will external graphic card improve performance?
If you have used any egpu does it improve performance? My laptop is NP350V4X so o don't think i can change my slow amd radeon HD 7670m.
Graphic Cards
Will external graphic card improve gameing performance?
If you have used any egpu does it improve performance? My laptop is NP350V4X so o don't think i can change my slow amd radeon HD 7670m.
Gaming
Buying a new Graphics card
I am buying a new graphics card for my laptop and i am not sure if it is compatible with my computer. I don't know how to tell. I have a Lenovo Y710 that currently has an ATI Radeon 2300. Someone told me that this one might work. ATI HD 4500 4570 M92 XT DDR3 256M MXM II Vedio VGA Card - eBay...
Graphic Cards
Performance + WEI Subscore drop
I have a trouble with my computer performance. First time i bought my Notebook, my processor subscore is 6.3 about 4 month past i rerun my WEI and the score become 4.6 What happen to my computer? Did my processor broken or something? Now my notebook is reaaaaaly slow... It takes up to 8...
Performance & Maintenance


Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 22:36.
Twitter Facebook Google+