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Windows 7: best hd montor 22 inch out there

23 Oct 2010   #11
sinbin

windows 7 64 bit premium
 
 

thanks for help.please keep posting people.my screen is very important as i look at all the time when on pc,so i need make perfect choice


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
23 Oct 2010   #12
thefabe

Windows 7 ultimate 64 bit / XP Home sp3
 
 

Quote:
I hear benq are good monitors.i seen a led hd monitor for 160 any good,what is led
LED stands for Light Emitting Diode.(like the lights in case fans)
It's basically requires very little electricity to light up their fore being very efficient. New monitors and TV's are going to LED's over LCD's (Liquid Crystal Display) for a better picture quality.

Knowing where you live and where you would shop would help to narrow down what's available to you.

I have had Viewsonics. LG and at present a 24in HP TFT LCD which I like a lot. The suggestion to look at them side by side is a great way to decide.

Another thing is to read on Newegg or say Tigerdirect at the reviews on the particular monitor your thinking of purchasing.
Please remember some people don't know what they're talking about when reading these reviews, also check what they have listed as their ability level.

Just a couple more things before buying a LCD check the warranty on the LCD but also check and see what they list as an acceptable amount of dead pixels on a screen. Some manufacturers won't replace a LCD if it only has a few dead Pixels. Which I find absurd since I expect them all to work properly.

If you plan on gaming on it make sure you get the fastest ms response. You'll see anywhere from 2ms to 5ms which is acceptable for most casual gamers this is how fast a pixel will change color. Gamers claim that a LCD is not fast enough to prevent the Ghosting effect where you'll see a second image, personally I've never seen this even with a 5ms response LCD.

You will want to take into consideration a matte screen or a glossy screen(TFT) as well as brightens, backlight, contrast ratio, and what ports are avalible like VGA, DVI or HDMI are also important. You might also have additional USB ports on some as well as speakers but they generally stink.

So this is why seeing them side by side is the best way to buy a LCD and comparing specs and warranties.
Fabe
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 Oct 2010   #13
zzz2496

Windows7 Ultimate 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by thefabe View Post
Quote:
I hear benq are good monitors.i seen a led hd monitor for 160 any good,what is led
LED stands for Light Emitting Diode.(like the lights in case fans)
It's basically requires very little electricity to light up their fore being very efficient. New monitors and TV's are going to LED's over LCD's (Liquid Crystal Display) for a better picture quality.

Knowing where you live and where you would shop would help to narrow down what's available to you.

I have had Viewsonics. LG and at present a 24in HP TFT LCD which I like a lot. The suggestion to look at them side by side is a great way to decide.

Another thing is to read on Newegg or say Tigerdirect at the reviews on the particular monitor your thinking of purchasing.
Please remember some people don't know what they're talking about when reading these reviews, also check what they have listed as their ability level.

Just a couple more things before buying a LCD check the warranty on the LCD but also check and see what they list as an acceptable amount of dead pixels on a screen. Some manufacturers won't replace a LCD if it only has a few dead Pixels. Which I find absurd since I expect them all to work properly.

If you plan on gaming on it make sure you get the fastest ms response. You'll see anywhere from 2ms to 5ms which is acceptable for most casual gamers this is how fast a pixel will change color. Gamers claim that a LCD is not fast enough to prevent the Ghosting effect where you'll see a second image, personally I've never seen this even with a 5ms response LCD.

You will want to take into consideration a matte screen or a glossy screen(TFT) as well.
Brightens, backlight and contrast ratio are also important.

So this is why seeing them side by side is the best way to buy a LCD and comparing specs and warranties.
Fabe
I'd like to add a little fact: LED in this topic refers to the backlighting system. In prior designs, LCD monitors use CCFL lamp to light up the LCD panel (without it, you won't be able to "see" the picture on a LCD screen). LED backlit displays still need a LCD panel to show images.

Now, as technology advances - there are several alternatives to replace CCFL. CCFL by design needs time to achieve optimum brightness (from a cold start), not to mention it will change color and it'll dimm off as it aged, (some quite severe).

LED on the other hand will light up instantly, reach maximum brightness in an instant and as it age, it's brightness deteriorates a lot more gracefully than CCFL. Not to mention you can build a more aesthetically pleasing design using LED backlight (well, it depends on one's taste and the design of the backlight system).

There are 2 types of LED backlighting system:

First: Edge backlight. TVs (or computer monitors) today that are very thin in profile uses edge backlight. The plus side of this design is that it's very power efficient, since you need a fraction of LED diodes compared to the normal design, the minus side is that... it's just that, you just replacing the CCFL backlight with LED diodes... It's same old design using new components, which is... well... stupid (I'll get to why it's stupid on the next paragraph). Current LED backlight today will produce a "cooler" images (it's more blueish) than CCFL. It's harder to calibrate, and if you have one of the cluster die, you'll get a weird "shadow" on your display...

Second: Normal LED backlight with local dimming. This design is the "correct" way of doing LED backlight. The LED diodes are to be put at the back of the LCD panel in clusters as it were when CCFL was used. The plus side is, you get MORE brightness. Several designs (look for top of the line TVs that has "LED with local dimming" to see what I mean) have the capability to turn sections of the backlight completely OFF, thus you can get the perfect Black using LCD displays. The minus side is obviously more energy needed to power all of those LED diodes, and the physique of the display it self won't differ much compared to old LCD monitors (read: thick monitors). But by using this design, you can get gargantuan contrast ratio (close to plasma display's contrast ratio) that will put "Dynamic contrast" to shame (btw, "Dynamic contrast" is stupid...). Some manufacturers claims they have 1.000.000:1 contrast ratio by using this design. I don't really know how to test these claims, but
looking at displays that's using this design... It's a true beauty...

zzz2496
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

24 Oct 2010   #14
Windows i7 920

Windows 8 Pro x64
 
 

The ASUS VW246H is an excellent monitor. ASUSTeK Computer Inc.

This is what I have and I really like it. It does not have a very high refresh rate (60 Hz), but if you turn on Vsync on games, it works pretty well.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Oct 2010   #15
sinbin

windows 7 64 bit premium
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by zzz2496 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by thefabe View Post
Quote:
I hear benq are good monitors.i seen a led hd monitor for 160 any good,what is led
LED stands for Light Emitting Diode.(like the lights in case fans)
It's basically requires very little electricity to light up their fore being very efficient. New monitors and TV's are going to LED's over LCD's (Liquid Crystal Display) for a better picture quality.

Knowing where you live and where you would shop would help to narrow down what's available to you.

I have had Viewsonics. LG and at present a 24in HP TFT LCD which I like a lot. The suggestion to look at them side by side is a great way to decide.

Another thing is to read on Newegg or say Tigerdirect at the reviews on the particular monitor your thinking of purchasing.
Please remember some people don't know what they're talking about when reading these reviews, also check what they have listed as their ability level.

Just a couple more things before buying a LCD check the warranty on the LCD but also check and see what they list as an acceptable amount of dead pixels on a screen. Some manufacturers won't replace a LCD if it only has a few dead Pixels. Which I find absurd since I expect them all to work properly.

If you plan on gaming on it make sure you get the fastest ms response. You'll see anywhere from 2ms to 5ms which is acceptable for most casual gamers this is how fast a pixel will change color. Gamers claim that a LCD is not fast enough to prevent the Ghosting effect where you'll see a second image, personally I've never seen this even with a 5ms response LCD.

You will want to take into consideration a matte screen or a glossy screen(TFT) as well.
Brightens, backlight and contrast ratio are also important.

So this is why seeing them side by side is the best way to buy a LCD and comparing specs and warranties.
Fabe
I'd like to add a little fact: LED in this topic refers to the backlighting system. In prior designs, LCD monitors use CCFL lamp to light up the LCD panel (without it, you won't be able to "see" the picture on a LCD screen). LED backlit displays still need a LCD panel to show images.

Now, as technology advances - there are several alternatives to replace CCFL. CCFL by design needs time to achieve optimum brightness (from a cold start), not to mention it will change color and it'll dimm off as it aged, (some quite severe).

LED on the other hand will light up instantly, reach maximum brightness in an instant and as it age, it's brightness deteriorates a lot more gracefully than CCFL. Not to mention you can build a more aesthetically pleasing design using LED backlight (well, it depends on one's taste and the design of the backlight system).

There are 2 types of LED backlighting system:

First: Edge backlight. TVs (or computer monitors) today that are very thin in profile uses edge backlight. The plus side of this design is that it's very power efficient, since you need a fraction of LED diodes compared to the normal design, the minus side is that... it's just that, you just replacing the CCFL backlight with LED diodes... It's same old design using new components, which is... well... stupid (I'll get to why it's stupid on the next paragraph). Current LED backlight today will produce a "cooler" images (it's more blueish) than CCFL. It's harder to calibrate, and if you have one of the cluster die, you'll get a weird "shadow" on your display...

Second: Normal LED backlight with local dimming. This design is the "correct" way of doing LED backlight. The LED diodes are to be put at the back of the LCD panel in clusters as it were when CCFL was used. The plus side is, you get MORE brightness. Several designs (look for top of the line TVs that has "LED with local dimming" to see what I mean) have the capability to turn sections of the backlight completely OFF, thus you can get the perfect Black using LCD displays. The minus side is obviously more energy needed to power all of those LED diodes, and the physique of the display it self won't differ much compared to old LCD monitors (read: thick monitors). But by using this design, you can get gargantuan contrast ratio (close to plasma display's contrast ratio) that will put "Dynamic contrast" to shame (btw, "Dynamic contrast" is stupid...). Some manufacturers claims they have 1.000.000:1 contrast ratio by using this design. I don't really know how to test these claims, but
looking at displays that's using this design... It's a true beauty...

zzz2496
Wow different tyes of led1i going towards led !which type do i need look for ,and are they good for gaming.Samsung BX2450 24 inch widescreen Series 50 LED Monitor (5000000:1, 250cd/m2, 1920 x 1080, 5ms, VGA, HDMI (Charcoal Grey)): Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories
i have my eye on this samsung
or thisLG E2250V 22" LED Monitor 1920 x 1080p HDMI DVI 5ms Blk: Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories lg
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Oct 2010   #16
zzz2496

Windows7 Ultimate 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by sinbin View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by zzz2496 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by thefabe View Post
LED stands for Light Emitting Diode.(like the lights in case fans)
It's basically requires very little electricity to light up their fore being very efficient. New monitors and TV's are going to LED's over LCD's (Liquid Crystal Display) for a better picture quality.

Knowing where you live and where you would shop would help to narrow down what's available to you.

I have had Viewsonics. LG and at present a 24in HP TFT LCD which I like a lot. The suggestion to look at them side by side is a great way to decide.

Another thing is to read on Newegg or say Tigerdirect at the reviews on the particular monitor your thinking of purchasing.
Please remember some people don't know what they're talking about when reading these reviews, also check what they have listed as their ability level.

Just a couple more things before buying a LCD check the warranty on the LCD but also check and see what they list as an acceptable amount of dead pixels on a screen. Some manufacturers won't replace a LCD if it only has a few dead Pixels. Which I find absurd since I expect them all to work properly.

If you plan on gaming on it make sure you get the fastest ms response. You'll see anywhere from 2ms to 5ms which is acceptable for most casual gamers this is how fast a pixel will change color. Gamers claim that a LCD is not fast enough to prevent the Ghosting effect where you'll see a second image, personally I've never seen this even with a 5ms response LCD.

You will want to take into consideration a matte screen or a glossy screen(TFT) as well.
Brightens, backlight and contrast ratio are also important.

So this is why seeing them side by side is the best way to buy a LCD and comparing specs and warranties.
Fabe
I'd like to add a little fact: LED in this topic refers to the backlighting system. In prior designs, LCD monitors use CCFL lamp to light up the LCD panel (without it, you won't be able to "see" the picture on a LCD screen). LED backlit displays still need a LCD panel to show images.

Now, as technology advances - there are several alternatives to replace CCFL. CCFL by design needs time to achieve optimum brightness (from a cold start), not to mention it will change color and it'll dimm off as it aged, (some quite severe).

LED on the other hand will light up instantly, reach maximum brightness in an instant and as it age, it's brightness deteriorates a lot more gracefully than CCFL. Not to mention you can build a more aesthetically pleasing design using LED backlight (well, it depends on one's taste and the design of the backlight system).

There are 2 types of LED backlighting system:

First: Edge backlight. TVs (or computer monitors) today that are very thin in profile uses edge backlight. The plus side of this design is that it's very power efficient, since you need a fraction of LED diodes compared to the normal design, the minus side is that... it's just that, you just replacing the CCFL backlight with LED diodes... It's same old design using new components, which is... well... stupid (I'll get to why it's stupid on the next paragraph). Current LED backlight today will produce a "cooler" images (it's more blueish) than CCFL. It's harder to calibrate, and if you have one of the cluster die, you'll get a weird "shadow" on your display...

Second: Normal LED backlight with local dimming. This design is the "correct" way of doing LED backlight. The LED diodes are to be put at the back of the LCD panel in clusters as it were when CCFL was used. The plus side is, you get MORE brightness. Several designs (look for top of the line TVs that has "LED with local dimming" to see what I mean) have the capability to turn sections of the backlight completely OFF, thus you can get the perfect Black using LCD displays. The minus side is obviously more energy needed to power all of those LED diodes, and the physique of the display it self won't differ much compared to old LCD monitors (read: thick monitors). But by using this design, you can get gargantuan contrast ratio (close to plasma display's contrast ratio) that will put "Dynamic contrast" to shame (btw, "Dynamic contrast" is stupid...). Some manufacturers claims they have 1.000.000:1 contrast ratio by using this design. I don't really know how to test these claims, but
looking at displays that's using this design... It's a true beauty...

zzz2496
Wow different tyes of led1i going towards led !which type do i need look for ,and are they good for gaming.Samsung BX2450 24 inch widescreen Series 50 LED Monitor (5000000:1, 250cd/m2, 1920 x 1080, 5ms, VGA, HDMI (Charcoal Grey)): Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories
i have my eye on this samsung
or thisLG E2250V 22" LED Monitor 1920 x 1080p HDMI DVI 5ms Blk: Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories lg
In computer space, currently there are no monitor with local dimming capability. If I were to choose, I'd take any monitor that uses IPS panel over LED backlight... IPS = the Rolls Royce of LCD panels. You'd be better off using better panel over those el cheapo panels + gimmicky edge LED backlight...

But each to their own...
Look for DELL U2410, or DELL 2408WFP, I personally use DELL 2407WFP, it's the best display of it's class - close to "The Best" (as in price/performance ratio).

zzz2496
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Oct 2010   #17
DirtyElf

Windows 7 64-bit Home
 
 

i have a samsung PX2370 at work and to be honest for the price they paid for it - its not really worth the money.

its super thin, but the inputs stick straight out the back... so you cant put it up against anything and take advantage of the thin monitor. the stand is wobbly as hell and i have to weigh it down to help stop the shaking as i type. it also changes colors really bad depending on what angle you are looking at it. i have to sit directly in front of it to get good color. if i lean or move a little the colors shift. from what ive read and IPS panel wont do that.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Oct 2010   #18
1Bowtie

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit
 
 

I use dual Dell 2007WFP's from Dell outlet store and they are fantastic
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Oct 2010   #19
Zepher

Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by zzz2496 View Post
In computer space, currently there are no monitor with local dimming capability. If I were to choose, I'd take any monitor that uses IPS panel over LED backlight... IPS = the Rolls Royce of LCD panels. You'd be better off using better panel over those el cheapo panels + gimmicky edge LED backlight...

But each to their own...
Look for DELL U2410, or DELL 2408WFP, I personally use DELL 2407WFP, it's the best display of it's class - close to "The Best" (as in price/performance ratio).

zzz2496
One of the best screens on the market is the Apple Cinema, and it is LED and IPS.
http://www.apple.com/displays/
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Oct 2010   #20
1Bowtie

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit
 
 

And it's probably the most expensive monitor out there bar none because it's Apple .
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 best hd montor 22 inch out there




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