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Windows 7: CPU Cooler Temps

25 Jan 2011   #21
Cr00zng

Windows 7 64-bit, Windows 8.1 64-bit, OSX El Capitan, Windows 10 (VMware)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by GeneO View Post
I found the best way to apply paste is with some wax paper on my finger onto the cooler. It spreads easily and uniformly. You only want a thin layer and to thinly cover the pipes and maybe a tad more in the grooves between the heat pipes.

When you put the cooler on the CPU move it around just a *little* bit to spread the paste out.

It can't be much else other than the coupling of the cooler since you seem to have adequate air flow. If you ran out of thermal paste that says to me you put too much on. Go out and by some Arctic Silver 5 and apply a thin layer.
Actually, Artic Silver recommends not to spread the thermal compound by hand; quote from kodi provided link for the AMD CPU:

Quote:
Use your manufacturer's heatsink instructions in combination with the following suggestions: Do NOT spread the dot of thermal compound out. When you place the heatsink on the top of the metal cap, the dot of thermal compound will spread out like the blue circular pattern on top of the metal cap shown in photo QP4.
I've always used spreading the Artic Silver, but it didn't work well for the i5 CPU; the temperatures were on the high side using this method of application. Resetting the heatsink with the vertical line application of the thermal compound did lower the i5 CPU temperature to normal range. Maybe the initial spreading wasn't done right on the first place, but I am sold on the vertical line method for the i5 CPU...


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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25 Jan 2011   #22
GeneO

Windows 10 Pro. EFI boot partition, full EFI boot
 
 

The 212 uses heat pipes and it's surface isn't entirely smooth - that is why I spread it. If one used the line method, I'd think you'd want the line perpendicular to the heat-pipes. YMMV.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Jan 2011   #23
essenbe

Windows 10 Pro/ Windows 10 Pro Insider
 
 

With direct contact heat pipes, the heat pipes are about .005 mm higher than the aluminum base. Therefore I have always filled in the aluminum gaps even with the pipes. It is different than a solid flat base such as the stock cooler. The Artic Silver instructions that GeneO referenced links to other instructions if you are applying to direct contact heat pipes. I believe that was what GeneO was saying.

My apologies, I believe it was Kodi who linked to the Arctic Silver instructions.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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25 Jan 2011   #24
Stratos

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 / OS X Snow Leopard 10.6.8
 
 

When you have cooling issues with the CPU (personally I don't think the posted temps are high, they're well within acceptable tolerances). However if you want to improve upon them, we'll need to start at the CPU first.

Clean off the CPU of all paste with a paper towel dampened with a small amount of denatured alcohol. You don't need a lot.

Now examine the surface, make sure there are no defects on the surface. If all looks normal, it's time to get out a tub of thermal paste (if you're too cheap to buy a new tub, ask the shop tech if he'd be willing to put some on an edge of a unused credit card, plastic knife or what not. Personally I think it's never a bad idea to have some on hand.

When you spread the paste on the contact surface of the CPU, apply it with a credit card or something like it. Don't touch it with your finger as it has oils and other things which may contaminate the paste. Spread it as thin as possible. The "thickness" you're shooting for is... if you did it right, you can take a strand of hair and drag it across the surface of the paste and it'll reveal the CPU surface. If you use Arctic Silver, it should be a little less than paper thin.

Now we need to prep the HSF (heatsink/fan). Clean off the surface which contacts the CPU with denatured alcohol and a clean paper towel. Let it dry and apply a small portion of Arctic Silver onto the surface of the HSF, make note that it may have an obvious indentation of where it makes contact with the CPU. Just like how you'd apply wax on a car, apply paste liberally onto the surface. Let it set then wipe off the excess, just like taking off wax on a car. If you did things right, all you'll see is a smudge or a discolored HSF surface.

Now install the CPU, make sure it's flush with the socket and secure it. Set the HSF on vertically as possible (avoid installing it at an angle), make sure it sits flush then secure.


Now we need to take care of the internal of the case, I don't know how the hardware and cables are installed but I've seen some really sloppy work. The cleaner and more organized the internals are setup, the better the airflow will be. A HSF can only cool as good as the quality of airflow within the machine. To see if you have an issue with case cooling, compare the CPU temps at idle with and without the side panel on. You could even try putting a small desk fan to blow into your case to see if that alters your results. If the desk fan changes things dramatically, then your solution is to simply improve airflow inside of the case. If it doesn't, the issue is very likely isolated to the CPU and HSF combo.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Jan 2011   #25
GeneO

Windows 10 Pro. EFI boot partition, full EFI boot
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by essenbe View Post
With direct contact heat pipes, the heat pipes are about .005 mm higher than the aluminum base. Therefore I have always filled in the aluminum gaps even with the pipes. It is different than a solid flat base such as the stock cooler. The Artic Silver instructions that GeneO referenced links to other instructions if you are applying to direct contact heat pipes. I believe that was what GeneO was saying.

My apologies, I believe it was Kodi who linked to the Arctic Silver instructions.
I don't think the aluminum gaps need filled, it is important that all of the copper pipes gets covered though for sure. If you put small drop of paste in the middle or a line, it may not spread to all of the copper pipes but instead be channeled into the aluminum gaps. I spread it - in order to make sure the pipes are coated.

- Gene
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 CPU Cooler Temps




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