Windows 7 Forums
Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: i think my brand new VIDEO CARD is broken

29 Jul 2009   #31
zigzag3143

Win 8 Release candidate 8400
 
 
grounding

make sure you ground yourself before you touch the card by touching something metallic like a water pip.

Ken


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
29 Jul 2009   #32
Mark

Windows 7 Ultimate Vista Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by edrik View Post
it's ok with me if the PSU breaks.. just not the other parts...


should have said this earlier...

when i first installed my new rig with my current monitor
the monitor didn't start... it says it's not getting any signal...
so i rebooted a couple of times changing from 1 video card to another until it turns on..

after doing so i (rendered) in revit architecture (that's 3d rendering)
the next morning i can't open my monitor *it says no signal*

so i restarted my unit and gladly it worked...
after a few hours on my project.. the monitor turned off saying it has no signal... i just finished installing drivers at that time (i was installing drivers while i was doing my project)..

then after that i hit the reset button on the cpu.. but the monitor still didn't start.
so i changed again to the other video card hoping it would work..
gladly it worked... but i after checking in device manager... only 1 video card was detected..
so i shutdown the computer and checked the motherboard if the video card fits perfectly..
after doing so... my monitor didn't open on boot.. (once again no signal)

now im doing my project on a slower system which is really stressful since my project is big and "Revit Architecture" takes up too many resources... it takes my slower unit 3 seconds to respond everytime i hit a command..
OK, have you tried on a different monitor, looking at your specs it states you have a built in TV tuner in your LCD screen, so does that mean it's not a proper computer monitor but a TV your using as a monitor? Have you tried a different Monitor cable and what sort of cable are you using (DVI, VGA or other)?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Jul 2009   #33
edrik

Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit
 
 

im using a VGA adapter

i tried removing one of the vid cards and it worked....

how do i check for any damaged part ?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

29 Jul 2009   #34
Mark

Windows 7 Ultimate Vista Ultimate x64
 
 

That's good news, so we know that nothing is fried but we still don't know about the other Video card so you will need to take out the remaining Video card and insert the other Card your still not sure about and boot again.

If both cards are working then I would definitely consider a better PSU.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Jul 2009   #35
edrik

Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit
 
 

the other card also works

whew... i thought my unit was a goner
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Jul 2009   #36
Antman

 

Back. This card/driver has a feature that powers down/off a card when that power/card is not required. I am using / a lot because I have read little about it.

I have a basic distrust of this type of PC technology. I also distrust a power supply where the mfgr's website will not provide detailed specs (no matter how pretty or expensive the PSU may be).

In your BIOS, have you selected a different config for the PCIe slots? Maybe the problem lies there.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Jul 2009   #37
edrik

Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Antman View Post
Back. This card/driver has a feature that powers down/off a card when that power/card is not required. I am using / a lot because I have read little about it.

I have a basic distrust of this type of PC technology. I also distrust a power supply where the mfgr's website will not provide detailed specs (no matter how pretty or expensive the PSU may be).

In your BIOS, have you selected a different config for the PCIe slots? Maybe the problem lies there.

i followed what is written on my motherboard manual... how should i set it ?


which PC technology do you not distrust ? the power down/off of a video card ?

I'll be back Ill just change back to my new rig w/ only one vid card

*so long 1gb video card T_T
see you till i have a new PSU*
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Jul 2009   #38
Mark

Windows 7 Ultimate Vista Ultimate x64
 
 

That's excellent news and I'm sure a very big relief but I am still very suspect of your PSU considering you were maxing it at the time of failure and we have established that the individual 12v rails are not producing enough AMPS.

Here's some more good info for you.

Quote:
Introduction

Pretty much every power supply on the market for a desktop PC computer is advertised solely on its wattage. Unfortunately, this is a simplistic view of a very complex issue. The power supply is there to convert the high voltage from the wall outlet into the lower voltages required to operate the computer circuitry. If this is not done properly, the irregular power signals that are sent to the components can cause damage and system instability. Because of this, it is important to make sure you buy a power supply that meets the needs of your computer system.

Peak vs. Maximum Wattage Output


This is the first real big gotcha when it comes to looking at power supply specifications. The peak output rating is the highest amount of power the unit can supply but this is only for a very brief time. Units cannot continuously supply power at this level and if it attempts to do so will cause damage. You want to find the maximum continuous wattage rating of the power supply. This is the highest amount that the unit can supply stably to the components. Even with this, you want to make sure the maximum wattage rating is higher than you intend to use.
Another thing to be aware of with the wattage output has to do with how it is calculated. There are three primary voltage rails inside of the power supply: +3.3V, +5V and +12V. Each of these supplies power to the various components of the computer system. It is the combined total power output of all these lines that make up the total power output of the power supply. The formula used to do this is:
  • Wattage = Voltage * Amperage
So, if you look at a power supply label and it shows that the +12V line supplies 18A of power, that voltage rail can supply a maximum of 216W of power. This may be only a small fraction of say the 450W the power supply is rated at. The maximum output of the +5V and +3.3V rails would then be calculated and added to the overall wattage rating.

+12V Rail


The most important voltage rail in a power supply is the +12V rail. This voltage rail supplies power to the most demanding components including the processor, drives, cooling fans and graphics cards. All of these items draw a lot of current and as a result you want to make sure that you purchase a unit that supplies enough power to the +12V rail.
With the increasing demands on the 12V lines, many new power supplies have multiple 12V rails that will be listed as +12V1, +12V2 and +12V3 depending on if it has two or three rails. When calculating the amps for the +12V line, it is necessary to look at the total amps produces from all of the 12V rails. Often times there might be a footnote that the combine maximum wattage will be less than the total rating of the rails. Just reverse the above formula to get the maximum combined amps.
  • Amperage = Wattage / Voltage
With this information about the +12V rails, one can use it against a general power usage based on the system of the system. Here are the recommendations for the minimum combined 12V rail amperages (and their relative PSU wattage rating) for various size computer systems:
  • Small Form Factor - 15A (250W)
  • Mini-Tower - 25A (300-350W)
  • Mid-Tower - 35A (400-500W)
  • Full Tower - 40A (600-650W)
  • Dual Video Card (SLI) - 60A (850W+)
Remember that these are only a recommendation. If you have specific power hungry components, check the power supply requirements with the manufacturer. Many high end graphics cards can pull near 200W on their own under full load. Running two of the cards can easily require a power supply that can sustain at least 750W or more of total power output.

Can My Computer Handle This?


I frequently get questions from people who are looking to upgrade their graphics card in their desktop computer system. Many high-end graphics cards have very specific requirements for power in order to operate properly. Thankfully this has improved with manufacturers now listing the minimum number of amps required on the 12V line in order for the cards to work. Previously they never published any power supply requirements.
Now, in terms of most desktop computers, the companies generally do not list the PC's power supply ratings in their specifications. Typically the user will have to open up the case and look for the power supply label to determine what exactly the system can support. Unfortunately, most desktop PCs will come with fairly low power supplies as cost savings measures. A typical desktop PC that didn't come with a dedicated graphics card will usually have between a 300 to 350W unit with around 15 to 22A rating. This will be fine for most budget graphics cards, but high end cards typically require more. Therefore, to use a high end card in such a desktop PC would require that the power supply also be upgraded which can be quite difficult.

Conclusions


Remember that everything we have been talking about involves the maximum limits of the computer power supply. Probably 99% of the time a computer is being used, it is not being used to its maximum potential and as a result will draw much less power than the maximums. The important thing is that the computer power supply needs to have enough headroom for those times that the system is being taxed heavily. Examples of such times are playing graphic intensive 3D games or doing video transcoding. These things heavily tax the components and need additional power.
As a case in point, I put a power usage meter between the power supply and the wall outlet on my computer as a test. During average computing, my system was pulling no more than 240W of power. This is well below the rating of my power supply. However, if I then play a 3D game for several hours, the power usage peaks upwards to around 400W of total power. Does this mean that a 400W power supply would be sufficient? Probably not as I have a large number of items that draw heavily on the 12V rail such that a 400W could have voltage problems.
PC Power Supply Wattage
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Jul 2009   #39
Mark

Windows 7 Ultimate Vista Ultimate x64
 
 

OK just been looking at some PSU's and this one was recommended from Corsair for your exact setup. Newegg.com - CORSAIR CMPSU-1000HX 1000W ATX12V 2.2 / EPS12V 2.91 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS Certified Modular Active PFC Compatible with Core i7 Power Supply - Power Supplies



Have a look on there site and you can enter the details on your build and they give you the recommended PSU.

Welcome to Corsair
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Jul 2009   #40
edrik

Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit
 
 

Thank you Mr. Grim for your help
finally got it sorted... I'll be buying the 1000HX Corsair PSU when i get enough money
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 i think my brand new VIDEO CARD is broken




Thread Tools




Similar help and support threads
Thread Forum
Is this a good graphics card brand.
Buy the VisionTek Radeon R9 270X Video Card at TigerDirect.ca I want this but im not sure about this brand.
Graphic Cards
network card getting broken ?
Hi. So as i am writing this message my network drops all the time and it is causing me issues which i jsut cant handle right now . I checked the router but it shows no problem, i have optic cable connection of 50mbps Speedtest.net by Ookla - My Results This is my current speed ( i barelly made...
Network & Sharing
Sign of a broken video card?
I was playing CSGO and my computer suddenly crashed on me. Second time it has happened. Upon reboot, i got these artifacts on the screen. It's not the monitor, my Xbox shows up fine. The BSOD won't even show up properly, can't read off the error code. Is this the sign of a broken video card? ...
Graphic Cards
Would the graphics card have to be the same brand as the motherboard?
Hello everyone, sorry for troubling you guys again, I'm a tech noob, so I need help. If I were to buy an ASUS motherboard. Am I required to buy an ASUS GPU with it or could I just buy one from MSI or EVGA to use on my ASUS motherboard?
Hardware & Devices
How Do I fix a broken SD Card Slot
On my sister's computer which is a Dell Inspiron 560 it has an SD Card Slot. The SD Card Slot stopped working a while ago and I was trying to help her fix it. The drive letter for it is S: and it says please insert a card. The reader itself is lighting up saying that there is a card in there. If i...
Hardware & Devices
Broken Graphics Card
Hey guys, just got a quick question Is a broken graphics card enough to make a computer turn itself off right after being turned on with no other hardware interaction?
Hardware & Devices


Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

© Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:19.
Twitter Facebook Google+ Seven Forums iOS App Seven Forums Android App