Need to stop Windows looking for damaged partition


  1. Posts : 110
    Win 7 Home Premium (OEM) - Install date: 02-2010
       #1

    Need to stop Windows looking for damaged partition


    I have a drive with two partitions. One of the partitions is damaged in some way. That partition contained programs that I could not fit onto my SSD. The other partition I believe is fine but I cannot access it easily because if I start Windows with the drive connected, Windows is so slow as to be effectively unusable. Right now the drive is unplugged from the motherboard and so I can use Windows and the programs installed on the SSD. I'd like to now tell Windows not to look for partition R (even though many programs, including ones set to run at start-up are installed on it). This will allow me plug the drive back in and recover the data from the other partition before reformatting the drive. I have a back up of the data, but my suggested solution would be a lot quicker than retrieving that remote back up.

    Superfluous information:
    Incidentally, the partition in question showed as "at risk" in Disk Management but my attempts to uncover what that meant and how to resolve it had not succeeded. I actually had more than one computer problem at the same time and the other took presidency. Sometimes in the past two weeks the partition would disappear while Windows was running and restarting would get it back.
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 12,012
    Windows 7 Home Premium SP1, 64-bit
       #2

    I think you can disable drives in the BIOS or in Device Manager, but not partitions.

    The best partition tool used around here is Partition Wizard.

    http://www.partitionwizard.com/download.html

    You might be able to run it and see if it finds issues with the partition.

    Can you post a screen shot of Windows Disk Management with the problem drive connected? I'm wondering if any Windows components are installed on the problem partition?
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 110
    Win 7 Home Premium (OEM) - Install date: 02-2010
    Thread Starter
       #3

    Hey. Thanks for your advice. Disk Management does not display the drive.

    I'm going to try copying my data using a Kubuntu live DVD and then I'll look into fixing the partition or erasing the drive and reusing it (if it's knackered, it's still under warranty so I'll return it). If I'm unable to fix the partition, how can I get Windows to acknowledge those program installations are no longer available (and never will be) so I can move forward and start installing the lost programs again? If the answer involves reinstalling Windows, I'm running away and not coming back...
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 110
    Win 7 Home Premium (OEM) - Install date: 02-2010
    Thread Starter
       #4

    Well Kubuntu reads the healthy partition just fine so I can copy my data across from within it. It is unable to mount the bad partition. I'm currently running Spinrite but there are many bad sectors so the process is slow. Perhaps it's worth noting that this is a refurbished Seagate drive which was sent to me to replace a failed Seagate drive which was still under warranty. I'm guessing that the original warranty period has now lapsed.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 110
    Win 7 Home Premium (OEM) - Install date: 02-2010
    Thread Starter
       #5

    Hey, after running Spinrite a while, I got the drive recognised in Disk Management whereupon I promptly deleted the partitions! Windows is now able to move on! I've used CCleaner to remove invalid registry entries but I still have mounds of shortcuts in my start menu that don't work!

    After restarting the computer, the drive is no longer recognised. I'll look into why that is.

      My Computer


 

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