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Windows 7: Please Explain about GB/s and RPM on HDDs ???

28 Nov 2017   #11
RoasterMen

Windows 7 Home Premium 64-BIT
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Layback Bear View Post
Hard drive with higher rpm's will be faster.

It's not always the case with 5400 RPM and 7200 RPM drives.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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29 Nov 2017   #12
johnhoh

Win7 pro x64
 
 

You asked "which is the most governing factor in how quick a system responds"

The Most important metric is the Access Time of the boot drive. And the difference between an SSD and a spinning drive is 100:1.

I recently built a system for a guy who was tight on cash. Used a 128MB SSD for $50 as his boot drive and re-used his existing 3TB spinning drive for data.
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30 Nov 2017   #13
mrjimphelps

Linux Mint 18.2 xfce 64-bit (VMWare host) / Windows 8.1 Pro 32-bit (VMWare guest)
 
 

I don't think you'll find a lot of difference in speed when you compare the various internal hard drives. I suggest that you look for a name-brand drive with a low price, and go with that.

The speed difference comes when you compare an SSD to a mechanical hard drive. An SSD is a lot faster than a mechanical hard drive.

As for your plan to get two small-capacity drives, install the OS on both, and then hold one in reserve, that is a good plan. However, you should do regular backups as well, so that you have more than one way to get back up-and-running in the event of a disaster.

Having two identical drives for the OS will allow you to test your backup, and here's how:
  • Do a backup of your OS drive.
  • Restore the backup to the alternate OS drive.
  • Boot the computer with the alternate drive installed.
If everything works correctly, you can be confident that your backup is good, because you have actually tested it. And you can utilize your plan of swapping drives should something go wrong with the drive in the computer. This is an excellent reason to have a second identical drive for the OS.

As for your plan to keep your data on the big drive, and use it as your secondary internal drive, that too is a good plan, and here's why:
  • You should back up your data regularly; however, you don't need to back up your OS very often. Therefore, you will do a regular backup (say, weekly) of the data drive, and an occasional backup (say, every other month) of the OS drive.
  • If you ever need to restore or reinstall the OS (say, because your OS drive crashed), your data remains untouched, because it is kept on a separate drive.
Of course, to do backups, you'll need an external hard drive or other place to save the backups.
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30 Nov 2017   #14
BuckSkin

Windows 7 Pro x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
An SSD is a lot faster than a mechanical hard drive.
Thanks so much; I really appreciate your explanation of how to test a back-up image and your whole post in general.

From what I gather, an SSD will "boot" the O/S a lot quicker; what I am still a little unclear of is will such things as photo editing programs also respond and function much quicker with an SSD ?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Nov 2017   #15
mrjimphelps

Linux Mint 18.2 xfce 64-bit (VMWare host) / Windows 8.1 Pro 32-bit (VMWare guest)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by BuckSkin View Post
From what I gather, an SSD will "boot" the O/S a lot quicker; what I am still a little unclear of is will such things as photo editing programs also respond and function much quicker with an SSD ?
The computer will boot a lot faster, because during the boot process, a huge amount of data is being read from the hard drive. Since an SSD is a lot faster than a mechanical hard drive, your boot time will be a lot quicker.

However, you won't see much impact on photo editing, because the only time there is drive activity is when you are either opening the picture for editing, or saving it to the hard drive. Again, these two steps will be faster, but editing the photo won't be any faster. (If you have autosave on, it will be faster; but you won't notice, because autosave is done in the background.)

If you want to speed up the "non-disk" parts of your computing experience, you could add more memory to your computer, if it will take more memory. But you already have 8GB (according to your System Stats), and so you won't gain much if any speed there, because 8 GB is enough memory for just about every situation.

The one speed trick that no one seems to do any more is to create a RAM Disk, and then set your Windows temp folder to be on the RAM disk. This will give you a speed boost whenever Windows writes to the temp folder, sometimes a big speed boost. You can do the same for Internet Explorer (if that is your browser). Not only will this speed things up, but it has the added advantage of doing house cleaning (cleaning out the temp files) whenever you reboot the computer.

Here is information about a free RAM Disk program called DataRAM RAMDisk:
https://www.laptopmag.com/articles/f...nto-a-ram-disk

Here is how to change the location of your Windows and IE temp folders:
https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/...7-a76c0b450818

Back in the Windows 3.1 days, I was astounded at how fast a program installed on my computer when I set the Windows temp folder to be on my RAM drive.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Nov 2017   #16
BuckSkin

Windows 7 Pro x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
The one speed trick that no one seems to do any more is to create a RAM Disk, and then set your Windows temp folder to be on the RAM disk.
Thanks; I will look into that.

Speaking of the Temp folder, I had a peak in the Temp folder of one of our machines just last night and one of our photo editing programs, Picture Window Pro, had stashed a bunch of full size TIFF copies of some images we had been editing months ago, something like four differing versions of each image; behavior like that will soon fill up an O/S partition.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Nov 2017   #17
mrjimphelps

Linux Mint 18.2 xfce 64-bit (VMWare host) / Windows 8.1 Pro 32-bit (VMWare guest)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by BuckSkin View Post
Thanks; I will look into that.

Speaking of the Temp folder, I had a peak in the Temp folder of one of our machines just last night and one of our photo editing programs, Picture Window Pro, had stashed a bunch of full size TIFF copies of some images we had been editing months ago, something like four differing versions of each image; behavior like that will soon fill up an O/S partition.
Unfortunately, a lot of software doesn't clean up after itself; therefore you collect a lot of debris over time. If your TEMP folder were on a RAM drive, every time you reboot it would recreate the drive, in effect wiping it clean with each reboot.

On the other hand, sometimes you lose a file, and the only place you can recover it from is a TEMP folder. You could have done something like that if needed, because you had full size TIFF copies of some of your images.

All in all, I prefer a clean hard drive, so I like the fact that a RAM drive is flushed clean every time you reboot.
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 Please Explain about GB/s and RPM on HDDs ???




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