Windows 7 Forums
Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: Windows corrupted External Drive's data structure (inaccessible drive)

21 Dec 2017   #11
Acova

Windows 8.1 x64
 
 

@mrjimphelps
@Megahertz07

Update on the situation:
  • Made a USB with Linux Mint [Cinnamon] (I though to try OS and its looks, rather than going by ddrescue I am already familiar with)
  • I was able (as suspected) to access my drive via Linux-based OS
  • I made a full back up, including the folder filled with corruptions Windows found
  • Discovered that around 8-12 images were damaged (50-90% of their areas were grayed out)

mrjimphelps, thanks for sharing LinuxMint's download page. I've tried it, liked it but not sure if I am going to use this OS in future on usual basis.

Despite the successful operation of backing up/recovering the data, I am interested to know if there is any software available which would kinda "fix" accessibility thing of the drive for Windows. If someone knows of any or possible ways to fix this issue, your sharing is appreciated.

Regarding the time when I want to re-use my drive with messed up data structure:
1) Do I merely need to format it for it to recover from any dirty work left by Windows?

2) Also, can anyone advise about 2 TB storage use, e.g. is it preferable that I split the drive into smaller partitions or it is totally alright to keep using it as is, one big drive?


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
22 Dec 2017   #12
mrjimphelps

Linux Mint 18.2 xfce 64-bit (VMWare host) / Windows 8.1 Pro 32-bit (VMWare guest)
 
 

You could keep the Linux disk handy, to use for this type of situation, although you aren't using Linux as your normal OS.

In answer to your questions:

1) If you format the inaccessible drive, you can then copy your pics back to it. It will be fine after that. But be sure to do regular backups, in case this happens again.

2) I personally recommend 2 TB as a good size. 2 TB will work no matter what type of system / setup you have. However, I'm not convinced that the problems have been resolved for drives that are bigger than 2 TB. And I recommend that you keep all 2 TB of space as one big partition. In this way, all of the space is always available for everything. There is, however, one major advantage to dividing your drive into two partitions, with your OS on one and your data on the other: you can do a backup on the OS partition a few times a year, and do a backup on the data partition a lot more often than that. Doing this type of backup regimen is easy when you have separate OS and data partitions.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Dec 2017   #13
Megahertz07

Windows 7 HP 64
 
 

Use disk management to delete all partitions and then create a new one (2 T) and format it as NTFS.

Internal HDD are more reliable than portables, so my suggestion is to buy and install a small SDD (128G) for Windows and programs and use the actual drive for your data and use the external as a backup.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

22 Dec 2017   #14
Acova

Windows 8.1 x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
You could keep the Linux disk handy, to use for this type of situation, although you aren't using Linux as your normal OS.

In answer to your questions:

1) If you format the inaccessible drive, you can then copy your pics back to it. It will be fine after that. But be sure to do regular backups, in case this happens again.

2) I personally recommend 2 TB as a good size. 2 TB will work no matter what type of system / setup you have. However, I'm not convinced that the problems have been resolved for drives that are bigger than 2 TB. And I recommend that you keep all 2 TB of space as one big partition. In this way, all of the space is always available for everything. There is, however, one major advantage to dividing your drive into two partitions, with your OS on one and your data on the other: you can do a backup on the OS partition a few times a year, and do a backup on the data partition a lot more often than that. Doing this type of backup regimen is easy when you have separate OS and data partitions.
@mrjimphelps

When a drive gets formatted, all of its sectors get involved and thus get cleaned, as far as I can tell by my observations.

(as far as I understand) On the other hand, drive split into smaller ones can be formatted up to the range of how far it was split. Thus, it will not touch other drives but will only get involved the target one. The good side of it is that, unused sectors and tracks will remain unused and not involved, thus extending their lifetime a bit longer than the ones being used. In theory, it puts the device to the best of what it can be used, making the best of it, but it works as long as the main other components such as read and write components lasting this long. When I consider the best course of use for as large drive such as this 2 TB, it's about backing up data of no more than 300-400 GB. This means the other 1.5 TB are to be unused, possibly, a long time. Then, should I end up formatting my drive on occasional rate, I would rather prefer only one small drive getting formatted instead of the whole volume (probably it's very insignificant but I can't help myself not to think about it xD hahaha. Feeling like I should rather do something about myself having this much thinking done over this nuance instead though.. haha xD).

My goal: to use 2TB drive to the best of what it can, time wise. In few words, should the case of bad sectors arise one day, then this happens on actively used sectors which are in 1/4th of the whole drive, whilst other parts remain untouched and unused, making them effectively reliable. Thus, the device will last a long time of servicing to me. I did come across some news that the system can map bad sectors and isolate them, but considering bad sectors' occurrences, nearby sectors are likely to go into bad state as well (I might lack of extra insight into how sectors are positioned next to each other or how the drive's range is rather "split" from a point of a physical view on disk). Anyways, I suppose, I would decide to move from bad drive, to a healthier one, and worry a lot less about drive's reliability then if I had a map of isolated bad sectors in use there.

Question: wouldn't the above be a fine strategy of using 2TB drive to the given conditions? or does it appear a bit off the track / illogical at times?


Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
...There is, however, one major advantage to dividing your drive into two partitions, with your OS on one and your data on the other: you can do a backup on the OS partition a few times a year, and do a backup on the data partition a lot more often than that. Doing this type of backup regimen is easy when you have separate OS and data partitions.
Apparently, the laptop, I am using at this moment, already had this system incorporated since the day of its arrival at my place, e.g. it has around 500gb for OS and the other ~350 gb separated to another drive. My earlier image-attachment has actually captured it. At first I did wonder why would it appear this way, but at the same time I knew there was a good reason for this (and you mentioned it just now).

In fact, the D drive from an earlier picture, hasn't been used much at all. It probably saw only up to 8 small files in its whole time. It's practically fresh, and should I need to move from C drive because of bad sectors, it won't be of a problem to make a use of D drive there afterwards. ;D

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
You could keep the Linux disk handy, to use for this type of situation, although you aren't using Linux as your normal OS.
LinuxMint still takes up on fair amount of space. DDRescue has already helped me once with the data recovery and if I don't mistake, it is based on Linux, therefore, it would be as useful as LinuxMint. It has pretty much all of what one needs to go by means of accessing inaccessible drive or saving data from a failing one. Its size is 500MB, whilst LinuxMint, takes from 1.8GB to 2GB.

On the other hand, the interface is nicer in LinuxMint, but it's down to everyone's own preference at this point. I will, however, keep a hold of the ISO I downloaded for the time being, as I might find it more useful for other purposes or activities. If it wasn't for your suggestion to try it, I wouldn't have it seen, at least, not in near future, but as such did happen, I experienced something new for myself ;D Thanks for this.


Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Megahertz07 View Post
...Internal HDD are more reliable than portables, so my suggestion is to buy and install a small SDD (128G) for Windows and programs and use the actual drive for your data and use the external as a backup.
I agree about reliability of those types.
Your suggestion very reasonable and sounding to me.
Thanks!


------

Later, I will be investigating the problem with external drive's disconnection issue.
If I remember it right, I did come across one interesting entry in Event Viewer Logs.
I will update this thread should I find something new or relevant to problems I had described earlier (e.g. disconnecting/ejecting device not being successful upon first try - and why, or why it would not connect the device and recognise it from the first try).
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 Dec 2017   #15
mrjimphelps

Linux Mint 18.2 xfce 64-bit (VMWare host) / Windows 8.1 Pro 32-bit (VMWare guest)
 
 

With a 2TB drive, I would suggest dividing it into two partitions:
1) The Windows partition would be 200GB. This would provide plenty of space for everything that Windows will ever need.
2) The remaining space would be the 2nd partition. This would give you approx. 1.8TB of space for data.

By dividing the drive like this, backups will be simple; and if you ever need to reinstall Windows, your data partition will not be affected in any way, only your Windows partition.

I wouldn't worry about saving parts of the drive for future use. Windows will adequately manage bad sectors as they arise. Unless the drive is bad, you won't get very many bad sectors, so if you do what you have suggested, you will just be putting a lot of unneeded work on your plate.

Linux isn't going to take up any space on your hard drive, if you run it from the DVD, or if you run it from a flash drive. In fact, if you run it from a flash drive, you can configure it as you like, and it will remember what you have done. This is a big advantage of running Linux from a flash drive rather than from a DVD.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 Windows corrupted External Drive's data structure (inaccessible drive)




Thread Tools




Similar help and support threads
Thread Forum
Pendrive Inaccessible - Disk structure is corrupted or unreadable!
I download everything from the internet into my 32 GB HP Pendrive and also use it for Windows Ready Boost. But yesterday suddenly it gave the error message - G:\ is not accessible. The disk structure is corrupted and unreadable. I ran CHKDSK /r and the following is the output. The...
Hardware & Devices
Data Drive Partition - Inaccessible after installing W7 on new SSD
I thought I was doing good by keeping my data on a second partition of my OS drive. That way if my OS crashed my data would be still in tack on the second volume. I mean as long as the hdd didnít crash that is. I installed a new SSD and begin to install Windows on it. I donít remember...
General Discussion
Corrupted Partition Table on External USB Data Backup Drive
I have a Western Digital MyBook ES 500 GB external hard drive (USB and eSATA interfaces) for data backups formatted from a Windows XP PC that I now use with my laptop running Windows 7 64-bit Home Premium. Recently my son connected it to his Apple PC and tried to create a partition to back up his...
General Discussion
External Hard Drive: Inaccessible
Greetings, W7 Community. I have 2 external hard drives: Drive K and Drive L. I was working with some files on Drive C when the audio signal of an external device being added or removed sounded out of nowhere. Now, Windows does not recognize Drive L. When I try to access the drive, I am told that I...
Hardware & Devices
Data recovery problem, Can reach corrupted data but no external space.
Hi everyone.. My external USb Wd mybook box has 1 tb Seagate Sata 3 and i use original Wd disc as W7 installed... in My PC Case as sata II Today my old problem appears again as Corrupted disc... I have Get Data Back NTFS (and i used before plenty of times for recovery, loss data or...
Hardware & Devices


Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

© Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 20:11.
Twitter Facebook Google+