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Windows 7: Overheating Hard Drive

02 Feb 2018   #1
Nasty7

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 
Overheating Hard Drive

I have a customer with an Overheating HDD, and have never seen this before, 145F. It's an HP AIO, and Speccy shows the CPU is not very hot 50C, Intel i3. No Specs sorry, till later.

I'm going to take a look at it this weekend, see if it just needs a good cleaning, but this would not make sense to me. I wonder if something else would cause this. I've cleaned out many AIO's and none had the HDD this hot. Did a google search also, but most are just saying to clean it out.

What would be causing this?

Thanks, Nasty7


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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02 Feb 2018   #2
mrjimphelps

Linux Mint 18.2 xfce 64-bit (VMWare host) / Windows 8.1 Pro 32-bit (VMWare guest)
 
 

Sounds like either a bad hard drive or a bad power supply (sending too much power to the drive). Test your power supply with a multimeter. If all readings are correct, AND if no other device in the computer is overheating, then it has to be the drive.

But before concluding that, have you touched the drive to see if it feels hot? In other words, are you sure that this is an accurate temperature reading? You could put a thermometer on it to see if you get the same reading that the computer is now giving you.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Feb 2018   #3
Nasty7

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

Very good feedback Jim, I will do all of that, thank you very much!

Do you have a good link to show me how to test with Multimeter? I've always been a little confused on how to use it.

I'm guessing to plug it in and test Voltage or AMP from outside of the little Round End and the Inside Pin?

Thanks, Nasty7
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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02 Feb 2018   #4
mrjimphelps

Linux Mint 18.2 xfce 64-bit (VMWare host) / Windows 8.1 Pro 32-bit (VMWare guest)
 
 

Here is a really good explanation of the process:

http://www.liutilities.com/how-to/te...-power-supply/

It is important to use a grounding wristband, to keep from shorting something out. But if you don't have one, just make sure that you de-static your hands regularly by touching the metal case of the computer every minute or so. And don't stand on carpet or other "static electricity" type material while doing the procedure. It would be good to wear tennis shoes or other rubber-soled shoes while doing this, to reduce the possibility of static electricity.

I prefer an analog multimeter over a digital multimeter, because they are so much simpler to read and use. For me, it is easier to follow a needle moving than numbers moving. An analog is probably not as precise as a digital; but an analog will tell you if you are close to, or on, the number, which in just about every case is good enough.

You will set the dial on V (for volts), and you will pick a number which is 12 or a bit higher. If you set the dial on 50, then your needle will show 0 to 50 volts. For 50 volts, the needle would move all the way to the right, so 12 volts would mean that the needle would go about 1/4 of the way to the right.

If you are testing a 110V electrical socket, you would set the multimeter to 250 in the V area; then 110 volts would mean that the needle would go a little less than half way, because 125 would be half way to 250.

Don't forget to turn your multimeter off when you're done, so that the battery won't run out.

Here is the multimeter I have been referring to in the above description:
https://www.amazon.com/Tekpower-TP18.../dp/B00064CH6A
My System SpecsSystem Spec
05 Feb 2018   #5
Nasty7

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

I saved those directions Jim, but had a spare PSU laying around that I used to test, and the drive was still hot. The drive was replaced and is working well now with no overheating.

Thanks, now am prepared if this should happen again.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Feb 2018   #6
Megahertz07

Windows 7 HP 64
 
 

Current / Voltage may be Alternated Current (AC) or Direct Current (DC).
All voltages out of the PS are DC (3, 5 or 12 VDC).
Wall outlets are AC (110 VAC).
Set the voltmeter accordingly to what you want to measure.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Feb 2018   #7
Nasty7

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

Ahh, I'll pull out my Meter and take a look. I have a very old one, but was top of the line Multimeter in 2001.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Feb 2018   #8
mrjimphelps

Linux Mint 18.2 xfce 64-bit (VMWare host) / Windows 8.1 Pro 32-bit (VMWare guest)
 
 

You will definitely feel empowered when you have successfully checked the voltages on your power supply!
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Feb 2018   #9
badcrc

Windows 7 Pro x64 sp1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post

It is important to use a grounding wristband, to keep from shorting something out. But if you don't have one, just make sure that you de-static your hands regularly by touching the metal case of the computer every minute or so.
Can I just point out that only commercial anti-static wrist bands should be used - don't be tempted to make your own DIY version. There's always a danger of a chassis becoming 'live' (esp a broken, half-dismantled pc), and a jolt of mains across your chest (ie heart) can be fatal.

A store-bought anti-static wristband has a hidden high value series resistor (typically 5Mohm) to limit such current and prevent electrocution, whereas a DIY lash-up doesn't.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
10 Feb 2018   #10
cornemuse

Windows 7 Home Premium bit
 
 

I have a digi multimeter "Harbor Freight free with ANY purchase!!" but got a dedicated psu tester:

https://www.staples.com/Insten-POTHS...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

(this one, but bought from Frys Electronics, on sale, even less!)

google:

https://www.google.com/search?q=psu+...x-a&channel=sb

These things are simple, Green light = good

Can check every plug coming out of the psu.

If the psu 5 & 12 volts are ok, issue is most likely in hdd, either internally or not getting adequate cooling air. If psu is bad, everything inside computer is at risk.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Overheating Hard Drive




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