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Windows 7: Windows 7 dual boot using BIOS vs software vs switch ?

06 Jan 2019   #21
Mike99

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by SIW2 View Post
Yes



Guids are the identifiers between curly brackets. They appear to have been blanked out in your screenshot.
I blanked them out because I have no idea what information they contain.

What do all those numbers refer to?


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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07 Jan 2019   #22
Mike99

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by SIW2 View Post
Yes




Guids are the identifiers between curly brackets. They appear to have been blanked out in your screenshot.
I temporarily connected both drives & went into BIOS to verify the boot order was HDD before SSD.

Booted up to the default HDD & here's a screen shot of the Disk Management screen.


Attached Thumbnails
Windows 7 dual boot using BIOS vs software vs switch ?-disk-management_1.jpg  
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Jan 2019   #23
SIW2

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Vista x64 / 7 X64
 
 

In that case, the commands should be

bcdboot C:\windows /s E: ( adds boot entry for OS on C: to bcd store of E: )

bcdboot F:\windows ( adds boot entry for OS on F: to current live bcd store)
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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07 Jan 2019   #24
Mike99

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by SIW2 View Post
In that case, the commands should be

bcdboot C:\windows /s E: ( adds boot entry for OS on C: to bcd store of E: )

bcdboot F:\windows ( adds boot entry for OS on F: to current live bcd store)

OK, but I was pressing the ESC key on startup in order to bring up the boot menu. How come that did not work & why did that mess up the SSD?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Jan 2019   #25
SIW2

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Vista x64 / 7 X64
 
 

We are not mind readers. You probably didn't do it right.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Jan 2019   #26
Mike99

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by SIW2 View Post
We are not mind readers. You probably didn't do it right.

Using the method described in message #4 it looks like a boot menu will automatically appear at startup. I prefer not to do that since I can just see another family member not knowing what to do & selecting the wrong drive.

I chose to try the method described in message #6 where a key press is required in order to bring up a boot menu. That would/should protect the SSD & the program(s) on it. In my case pressing the ESC key brings up the boot menu. From reading about this method it is my understanding that the only thing that needs to be done is to put the boot drives in order in the BIOS, placing the default boot drive (HDD) ahead of the other boot drive (SSD). And thatís what I did.

Pressing ESC at start up did bring up a boot menu.
HDD drive at the top
DVD drive in the middle
SSD drive at the bottom

That appeared OK, however selecting the SSD still caused the HDD to boot, and the SSD became corrupted & had to be repaired.

When using the method described in message #6 and setting the boot drive priorities, what other steps are required? What did I miss?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
08 Jan 2019   #27
Megahertz07

Windows 7 HP 64
 
 

You probably have the SSD boot loader on the HDD. Did you detached the HDD when installing Win 7 on the SSD?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
08 Jan 2019   #28
Mike99

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Megahertz07 View Post
You probably have the SSD boot loader on the HDD. Did you detached the HDD when installing Win 7 on the SSD?

Yes the HDD was detached when Win7 was installed on the SSD. Each drive boots up correctly by itself.

Referring to message #14 -
When trying a 2nd time with both drives attached I got a black screen with a message to repair (recommended) or restart normally. I did not repair at that time.

Later when I connected only the SSD a message came up that Windows failed to start...,required device is inaccessible. Thatís when I inserted the Windows disc & chose repair.

Question - would that repair option return the SSD boot partition to its fresh Windows 7 install condition? Or would it have also made some changes that I would not be aware of?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
4 Weeks Ago   #29
Pete4

win7hp64
 
 

I have done exactly what you want to do for few years now on 2 of my laptop, since every other method sucks big time one way or another and there are 2 issues you need to resolve: Install Win 7 on 1 partition only (no EFI partition etc, I think it's called legacy boot or something similar). You need to do install Win7 with 1 disk present (take out the other disk for a moment). Once you install both Windows, put both disks back. You choose either permanent boot order in BIOS, or hit escape and get boot order for this boot only. No stupid menus, no delay in boot-up time unless disk order change, no 2 pages of some ridiculous instructions to follow to the letter, no extra programs to buy, install and later break with no way to boot your system (had that happen to me). I set 2 of my laptops like that, but it was few years ago and I don't remember exactly, but I think it was pretty straight forward, except for making sure all is on 1 partition only. I have another laptop setup as dual boot win7/Win10 and Win 10 have all those stupid little partitions for EFI etc, but Win7 is all in one partition only and here all I do is choose between legacy and UEFI boot to get either one. I think your problem is, you somehow installed 2 EFI partitions and that won't work. If you want some details, I try to dig some more info. Good luck and trust me this is the best simplest way to do it and it works perfect.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
4 Weeks Ago   #30
Mike99

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Pete4 View Post
I have done exactly what you want to do for few years now on 2 of my laptop, since every other method sucks big time one way or another and there are 2 issues you need to resolve: Install Win 7 on 1 partition only (no EFI partition etc, I think it's called legacy boot or something similar). You need to do install Win7 with 1 disk present (take out the other disk for a moment). Once you install both Windows, put both disks back. You choose either permanent boot order in BIOS, or hit escape and get boot order for this boot only. No stupid menus, no delay in boot-up time unless disk order change, no 2 pages of some ridiculous instructions to follow to the letter, no extra programs to buy, install and later break with no way to boot your system (had that happen to me). I set 2 of my laptops like that, but it was few years ago and I don't remember exactly, but I think it was pretty straight forward, except for making sure all is on 1 partition only. I have another laptop setup as dual boot win7/Win10 and Win 10 have all those stupid little partitions for EFI etc, but Win7 is all in one partition only and here all I do is choose between legacy and UEFI boot to get either one. I think your problem is, you somehow installed 2 EFI partitions and that won't work. If you want some details, I try to dig some more info. Good luck and trust me this is the best simplest way to do it and it works perfect.
Each drive has two partitions, one of them being the 100MB NTFS System Reserved partition. The other partition in the C: partition. Windows 7 was installed on each drive when it was the only drive connected. There is no EFI or UEFI on the drives.

I connect both drives & set the boot order in BIOS making the HHD priority. My Disk Management is shown in message #22. And then I did exactly what you said, ďhit escape and get boot order for this boot onlyĒ. However when I chose the SSD it still booted to the HHD which had the permanent boot priority.

Every tutorial Iíve seen says itís best to have each OS on its own drive. But then they instruct to connect the second drive & then to install the OS on it. They never say what to do if the OS is already on both drives.

You mention having only one partition on a drive. Does that mean I should delete the System Reserved partition?

What happens when I return the PC back to using just a single drive? IOW how do I get the System Reserved partition back?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Windows 7 dual boot using BIOS vs software vs switch ?




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