Windows 7 Forums
Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: need suggestion to select right wattage psu

08 Jun 2010   #11
Krispy1

Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit
 
 

get a 750 wat psu its plenty power for ur needs


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
08 Jun 2010   #12
raj11650

win 7 build 7600.16385 x64
 
 

[QUOTE=TVeblen;774440]
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by raj1402 View Post

If the plastic that is melted is on the male connector from the power supply, and the female socket on the motherboard is un-melted and clean, then replacing the power supply will also replace the connector and if the new connector fits correctly into the socket then it would solve this issue (melted parts).
yeah the connector from PSU is melted clearly indicating problem with PSU

the motherboard preventing it from further damage by switching off the system

i guess.


PSU from cooler-master got 2 rails of +12 volts and psu's from corsair

got single rails +12v both are around 40 amps

so which should i select , single rails(corsair) or dual rail(cooler master)
My System SpecsSystem Spec
08 Jun 2010   #13
Digerati

Windows 7 Profession 64-bit
 
 

Quote:
No. Not exactly.

Your description of the effect of Ohm's law is correct, but you are forgetting something. If you have a resistance in the connector, it impedes the flow of electrons, yes. But the end result is that the connection itself becomes a resistor. Resistors are made in different power ratings for a reason, as current flow across a resistance generates heat.
No! What I said (and you quoted it) was exactly right! Note that I was responding to the comment about "resistance so great that the metal contacts become red hot". Please do NOT take what I say out of context.

And you are making assumptions you can't. You talk about resistance in a connector, then that is a bad connection or connector which would have been a problem from the beginning. Or, if it worked loose due to expansion and contraction (along with vibrations from motors and heavy footfalls) - which again, means the connector was not properly secured in the first place, then the motherboard would be shutting down at the interruptions and instability of the essential 12V power, or the PSU would be shutting down after the first arc or so.

That said, if there was arcing, that is simple to determine. Look at the contacts. In DC arcing, the arc is always in the same direction, so black pit marks would be apparent on the metal.

Don't get me wrong - I hope you are right and it is just a bad connector - perhaps a loose wire inside making contact with an adjacent wire - but I think the odds are against that. I don't see a lose connection arcing so much with only 12V potential to cause the plastics to melt. I think that type heat can only be caused by sustained excessive current - which means a near-short somewhere.
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by raj1402
yeah the connector from PSU is melted clearly indicating problem with PSU
No it does not. You are assuming both the male and female sides of the connection are made of the exact same materials with the exact same melting point characteristics. That is highly unlikely - especially since the PSU and motherboard are made by different manufacturers. You have to look at the entire circuit, not just the component that fried.

Quote:
PSU from cooler-master got 2 rails of +12 volts and psu's from corsair

got single rails +12v both are around 40 amps

so which should i select , single rails(corsair) or dual rail(cooler master)
I prefer single rails but both are good makers - and that is key to buying a good PSU. The problem with multiple rails is that some reserve must always be set aside for each rail while a single rail keeps all available power available. This has nothing to do with quality of the PSU, or the quality of the power it delivers. But it does mean you may have to buy a bigger multi-rail to ensure you have enough on each rail. It also means the multi-rail system has more parts - therefore more opportunities for something to fail.

Also, of the Corsairs I have used, and that's been several, compared to the Cooler Masters I've seen, the Corsairs tend to be much quieter.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

08 Jun 2010   #14
Mellon Head

Win 7 Pro x64/Win 10 Pro x64 dual boot
 
 

I retract my original post as I am clearly incorrect. One does not argue with another member who has been granted the most exalted MVP status. I am clearly wrong, and I have wasted years of schooling in both electrical theory and electronics, and have basically wasted 25 years of my life in the practice of these flawed arts.

Thank you.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
08 Jun 2010   #15
Digerati

Windows 7 Profession 64-bit
 
 

Quote:
I did the math, and as long as I did it properly, you are partially correct. Based on a dead short on a PSU rail supplying 12V at 20 Amps, an approximately 24" wire would have it's temperature rise to more than 6500 degrees Celcius in one second, or 6.5 degrees C per millisecond.
Oh? Well, not sure how you determine that without knowing the current capability of the conductor. And without knowing at least the diameter or gauge of the wire, and composition of the conductive materials, I don't see how you can determine that capability. And sadly, the ATX Form Factor Power Supply Design Guide does not require specific wire sizes - it only recommends. So who knows what size wires are used in that supply? But either way, it is not important to this topic.

Quote:
It would take a tremendously bad power supply design for this to happen in the real world, I would think,
Ummm, you mean like the $10 no-name generic PSUs many users buy to save money, or many case retailers "toss in" to make the case sale? Sadly, catastrophic failures, where the PSU takes out everything plugged into it, is not that rare, and all the more reason to buy from a major maker.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
09 Jun 2010   #16
raj11650

win 7 build 7600.16385 x64
 
 

thanks for the suggestion i got cooler master extereme power 600 watts!!!
(yeah i checkd with them and mother board isnt affected so got new psu)
My System SpecsSystem Spec
09 Jun 2010   #17
Digerati

Windows 7 Profession 64-bit
 
 

So is it all working now?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
09 Jun 2010   #18
Mellon Head

Win 7 Pro x64/Win 10 Pro x64 dual boot
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Digerati View Post
Oh? Well, not sure how you determine that without knowing the current capability of the conductor. And without knowing at least the diameter or gauge of the wire, and composition of the conductive materials, I don't see how you can determine that capability. And sadly, the ATX Form Factor Power Supply Design Guide does not require specific wire sizes - it only recommends. So who knows what size wires are used in that supply? But either way, it is not important to this topic.
Yeah, it isn't like I actually design and build electronic systems for a living. Y'know, for about 25 years. How could I possibly know what I'm talking about?

And don't lecture me about current capacity, and composition, etc. I did look up some specs before doing the math.

I've edited my original posts to clarify my lack of knowledge.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
10 Jun 2010   #19
raj11650

win 7 build 7600.16385 x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Digerati View Post
So is it all working now?
its since 24 hr i have changed it

and it works fine ,it 's a continuous run!!!
My System SpecsSystem Spec
10 Jun 2010   #20
TVeblen

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 64 Bit Home Premium SP1
 
 

Congrats Raj

I'm glad it was a "simple" fix. Be sure those power connector latches are good and tight!
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 need suggestion to select right wattage psu




Thread Tools




Similar help and support threads
Thread Forum
Im deciding what PSU wattage I should go for, 600w or 750w?
Im on a 600w PC, I got a new GTX 770 and it requires 42A on the +12 rail. So I need a new PSU, I currently have a IntelCore 2 Quad Q9400 2.66GHz and I think I might need to change my processor soon so would it take up much wattage? Im afraid if I go for the 600w it might not be enough for a...
Hardware & Devices
Have enough power/wattage?
Alright, I have 6 fans in my computer that are led and I plan on changing them. At the moment I have an i5 2400, SSD, HDD, GeForce GTX 550 Ti, 8gb DDR3 RAM, DVD drive, 4 120mm blue led fans, and 2 140mm led fans. This is all being run by a 630W PSU. Now the reason I'm asking if I have enough...
Hardware & Devices
How much wattage for SLI?
How much wattage would it take to run SLI GeForce GTX 550 Ti? I have a 630W SLI ready power supply, but is that enough? They take 400W it says.
Graphic Cards
what is the real wattage of amd phenom II X 4 970 blk ed
Hello everyone i want to verify the wattage on this new cpu that amd revieled and a couple of sites are posting it at 140 watt some are postin 125 watt i want to know which is really correct or did they make 2 different models with different wattages here is one advertisment here 6431752 --...
Hardware & Devices
Upgrade question regarding wattage
So let's say I have a 450w PSU and want to get something like this: http://products.amd.com/en-ca/DesktopCPUDetail.aspx?id=509 So it says that it's wattage is 125w. So does this mean that the processor requires at a minimum a 125w PSU? If not, how to I calculate what kind sort of wattage I'd...
Hardware & Devices
How do I figure out my 6pin connector wattage?
So I'm planning to start saving for the ATI 5850 video card, but I am wondering if my 6pin connectors have 75watts (ATI website says. 75w 2x 6pin connectors). My PSU is the Enlight Sniper 650 W PSU. I have tried looking through the web for anything but haven't found anything on it. Aside from...
Hardware & Devices


Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:04.
Twitter Facebook Google+ Seven Forums iOS App Seven Forums Android App