Windows 7 Forums
Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: Two OS in one drive,,?

12 Jun 2011   #21
mickey megabyte

ultimate 64 sp1
 
 

for a start, easybcd will not let you point to two OSes on one drive partition.

your xp install will not work, and your windows 7 may be broken and crash all the time.

if you have plenty of time to waste, you can try it and let us know what happens.

why do you not want to partition your drive?


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
12 Jun 2011   #22
dsperber

Windows 7 Pro x64 (1), Win7 Pro X64 (2)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by mickey megabyte View Post
for a start, easybcd will not let you point to two OSes on one drive.
This is simply and absolutely NOT TRUE! Absolutely false (unless by "one drive" you really mean "one drive letter", i.e. "partition").

There is zero consideration for both Windows and EasyBCD regarding the bootable Windows OS partitions and whether they are on a single hard drive or multiple hard drives.


I have both WinXP and Win7 partitions on the same single hard drive:




And, the boot manager menu is handled perfectly by EasyBCD:




Nevertheless, we both agree that it is 100% absolutely true that you simply CANNOT install two versions of Windows into the same single physical partition.

The installers simply will not allow that. That's just not how it works. Two physical partitions are required, coupled by a boot manager menu.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
12 Jun 2011   #23
mickey megabyte

ultimate 64 sp1
 
 

sorry, i meant partition!

oops
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

12 Jun 2011   #24
Bare Foot Kid
Microsoft MVP

W 7 64-bit Ultimate
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by dsperber View Post
To clarify... when you install XP, the partition it is installed to names itself C when you boot to it. It's a particular physical partition on some drive, but when WinXP comes up that partition is lettered C.

When you install Win7 on a second partition, and then you boot to Win7, once again THAT particular physical partition is lettered C. It's a physically different partition than the WinXP partition, but they both are logically named C from their own perspective.
To clarify, you need to revisit and regroup on the miss-information you are telling people around here.

When Windows XP is not installed to the first physical partition of a HDD it will not be C: at all.

click to enlarge
Two OS in one drive,,?-xp.jpg


My System SpecsSystem Spec
12 Jun 2011   #25
dsperber

Windows 7 Pro x64 (1), Win7 Pro X64 (2)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Bare Foot Kid View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by dsperber View Post
To clarify... when you install XP, the partition it is installed to names itself C when you boot to it. It's a particular physical partition on some drive, but when WinXP comes up that partition is lettered C.

When you install Win7 on a second partition, and then you boot to Win7, once again THAT particular physical partition is lettered C. It's a physically different partition than the WinXP partition, but they both are logically named C from their own perspective.
To clarify, you need to revisit and regroup on the miss-information you are telling people around here.

When Windows XP is not installed to the first physical partition of a HDD it will not be C: at all.
click to enlarge
Attachment 159257
To clarify... (so that there is no MIS-information spread, and I agree with that)

You have a very unusual "system reserved" partition lettered C in that WinXP setup. This is essentially unheard of in my own experience, when installing WinXP onto a brand new hard drive which is what I was describing as the way he could add WinXP as a second OS to an existing Win7 environment.

In fact, a separate "system reserved" partition on a WinXP disk in a WinXP-only environment is just not going to happen as a result of a "stock" WinXP install to that disk booting directly from the Microsoft WinXP installation CD. It is a construct from Win7, not WinXP. It gets no drive letter in Win7, but gets a drive letter in WinXP. That's why it forces WinXP to get a letter other than C on that hard drive... but this is in my opinion a "should not occur" situation. If WinXP is installed first and Win7 installed as the second OS, this would never happen.

With a brand new drive, and BIOS set that drive to "hard disk #1", and no pre-existing "system reserved" partition marked as "active" and "primary" as would be the case on a brand new second hard drive, then WinXP absolutely WILL install itself as the one and only "active" and "primary" partition on that brand new drive. And it WILL be lettered as C to itself, when you boot to WinXP.


Hey... if you have a running Win98 partition, and you decide to install 32-bit WinXP as a second OS by running the WinXP installer (i.e. running SETUP.EXE from the WinXP installation CD) under Win98, then whatever Win98 drive letter you select for the target partition of that WinXP will actually be the drive letter the installed WinXP sees itself as when you boot to WinXP!

So yes, I agree with you that in very unusual installation situations, drive letters other than C are possible for an installed WinXP.

But not if you have a brand new empty hard drive, and boot from the CD to run the installer (rather than from a pre-existing installed Windows)... then the resulting WinXP will get a drive letter of C to itself when booted. And that's what I was describing to him.

I was trying NOT to talk about the more esoteric and exotic advanced installation setups, which I agree with you can result in drive letters other than C for WinXP as seen from itself. I was trying to "keep it simple", which seemed appropriate at the time.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
12 Jun 2011   #26
IamLEGEND

Windows 7 SP1 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by dsperber View Post
Actually, when you install Win7 into an environment in which WinXP already exists, you have two options:

(a) upgrade your WinXP partition to now be Win7. Existing programs and settings are migrated to the new Win7 environment, etc., and you no longer have WinXP when the installation process completes. You will simply end up with just Win7 in the same physical partition in which WinXP previously existed, replacing that old WinXP. There will be no more WinXP.

(b) ADD a Win7 system into a SECOND PARTITION, producing a multi-boot two-Windows setup. That's where boot manager comes into play, and you will be able to choose either your old untouched existing WinXP, or your newly installed "virgin" Win7 system with none of your WinXP programs or settings at all. Pure Microsoft vanilla starter Win7... from scratch, out of the box.
very well done dear dsperber,, appearing these two option of windows seven setup (on an existing xp os already installed on a partition) I did never know before,,,
thanks a lot, nice work,,,
now I m done...
My System SpecsSystem Spec
12 Jun 2011   #27
theog

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

ME/XP/Vista/Win7
 
 

Quote from dsperber
[Quote](a) upgrade your WinXP partition to now be Windows 7. Existing programs and settings are migrated to the new Windows 7 environment, etc., and you no longer have WinXP when the installation process completes. You will simply end up with just Windows 7 in the same physical partition in which WinXP previously existed, replacing that old WinXP. There will be no more WinXP.[Quote]

You would need to upgrade to Vista first, than Windows 7.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
12 Jun 2011   #28
dsperber

Windows 7 Pro x64 (1), Win7 Pro X64 (2)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by theog View Post
Quote from dsperber
Quote:
(a) upgrade your WinXP partition to now be Windows 7. Existing programs and settings are migrated to the new Windows 7 environment, etc., and you no longer have WinXP when the installation process completes. You will simply end up with just Windows 7 in the same physical partition in which WinXP previously existed, replacing that old WinXP. There will be no more WinXP.
You would need to upgrade to Vista first, than Windows 7.
I didn't know that.

I've never done anything but a "cold" Win7 install (either standalone, or added to an existing WinXP environment as a second OS). Never had any desire to upgrade my WinXP... to either Vista or Win7. I much prefer to start from a vanilla pure OS and install everything from scratch.

Nor have I ever used Vista. Skipped that entirely.

I just assumed you could upgrade directly from WinXP to Win7, but I stand corrected.

Thanks.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
12 Jun 2011   #29
Bare Foot Kid
Microsoft MVP

W 7 64-bit Ultimate
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by dsperber View Post

You have a very unusual "system reserved" partition lettered C in that WinXP setup. This is essentially unheard of in my own experience, when installing WinXP onto a brand new hard drive which is what I was describing as the way he could add WinXP as a second OS to an existing Win7 environment.

That was a clean install of XP to a HDD that was set up with the SysResv and an Extended in advance, after I booted to diskpart and ran the clean command, I set up the partitions and then booted the XP installer.

I've been trying to get through to you but you're so long-winded that you just disregard what others are trying to say and that makes it very confusing for the OPs, slow down and please pay attention, you are not the only person here with a lot of experience trying to help others.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
12 Jun 2011   #30
dsperber

Windows 7 Pro x64 (1), Win7 Pro X64 (2)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Bare Foot Kid View Post
That was a clean install of XP to a HDD that was set up with the SysResv and an Extended in advance
If I might ask, what is the purpose of having an extra "system reserved" partition when you are installing XP?? Yes, it's "primary" and "active" and would normally be where boot manager files would go for Win7. But for what purpose would it have benefit in an XP-only environment.

And besides, without your pre-preparing of the drive in this way, an XP install would simply create one partition on the drive, which would be both "primary" and "active" and also contain XP itself. No boot manager at the moment. And it would then be C, to itself.

And if you then were to add Win7 to this environment, the Win7 installer would place the boot manager files in that WinXP partition, which was already both "active" and "primary" on "hard disk #1". No need to create a "system reserved" partition.

None of this affects the rest of the hard drive, where you could have any other partitions you want. But I'm asking for what reason you would create the "system reserved" partition, which is (a) unneeded for a pure WinXP setup, and (b) unneeded for a dual XP/Win7 setup when Win7 is added second?

I'm not trying to be argumentative. I just don't see what purpose that extra partition serves in either a single-XP or dual-XP/7 environment. Why have it at all?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 Two OS in one drive,,?




Thread Tools




Similar help and support threads
Thread Forum
Windows 7 has swapped my drive paths with my boot drive and sec. drive
I have just finished a pc build with a SSD to be used as the boot/OS drive and a secondary 2 HDD setup in raid 0 for storage. First I started with the SSD only and installed win7, applied all the updates etc. At this point the system has rebooted at least half a dozen times with no issue. ...
Installation & Setup
Format & Partition New Drive to Use as a Backup Drive or Storage Drive
I want to prepare a factory fresh drive so that I can use it to save backup images. Soon I will have a second drive that will only be used to store data files. Neither drive will ever be used for the installation of an operating system. From what I've read, I see no advantage to having more than a...
Hardware & Devices
Storing games in the 2nd hard drive (D Drive) instead of Win C Drive.
Hi - just a quick question. Currently, my laptop is configured in the following manner: C Drive: where Windows 7 is stored -> on an SSD D Drive: hard disk drive. I want to store my games in my D drive but is concerned whether the way i do it is correct or not. When installing the games;...
Gaming
Additional drive appears (drive f) while forematting new drive
This is a new built computer, I have installed win7 64bit on a 500 gig hard drive (tosheba), this is drive C. Everything works fine! I was wanting to use windows 7 backup, so I went and got another 500 gig hard drive (WD), I connected the HD and powered up the computer and that's all I did!...
Hardware & Devices
Samsung s2 external hard drive not loading showing local disk F drive
I have a Samsung s2 1tb external hard drive. Today when I hooked it up to my laptop it would not load. It will shows local F drive when it usually will say samsung Drive. A pop up box will then appear stating "you need to format drive" I know if I reformat it I will lose all my data which...
Hardware & Devices
External Hard Drive - Drive Letter changed - unable to change back
I have a USB external hard drive that I keep all my documents etc on (had it for years) I upgraded from Vista Home to & Home Premium then had to upgrade recently to Professional to run my Sage. Through all these upgrades my ext. drive ran fine. Occasionally the drvie letter would change if I...
Hardware & Devices


Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:48.
Twitter Facebook Google+ Seven Forums iOS App Seven Forums Android App