Windows 7 Forums
Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: 32 bit vs 64 bit Comparison

15 Nov 2010   #191
PhreePhly

Windows 7 x64 (RTM via MSDN)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Keiichi25 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by PhreePhly View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by minimeister View Post
Has anyone failed to notice that MS doesn't really support 64-bit OS? Windows update site only runs on 32-bit, the only reason to have 32bit IE installed by default so you can do updates? Give me a break. If MS is not going to support it, why in the world would you ever get it?
Not sure if this is a troll or not, but just in case you really believe what you wrote, let me try and dispel that mis-conception.

First of all, Windows Update does NOT use the browser. It is a stand-alone program (32-bit in x86 and 64-bit in x64 Windows 7). You don't need to have IE installed to use the Update program.

The reason 32-bit IE is default, is that almost all of the popular add-ins, both MS and non-MS, are 32-bit plugins. Flash, up until just a few months ago, did not have a 64-bit plugin.

Also, just to put the "MS doesn't support 64-bit" argument to rest, Office 2010, the most sold Windows Application, is available in 64-bit. That required a tremendous amount of man-power. Much of the Excel source-code was written in assembly upto Office 2003. Converting the 32-bit version to 64-bit required a large amount of fresh code. And it had to equal or beat the performance of the previous version.

Large software houses, like MS, can't just throw software out on the market and hope it sticks. If you talk to the Silverlight guys about 64-bit Silverlight, they would love to get a 64-bit version out there, but the VAST majority of IE installs are 32-bit. The minute a 64-bit version goes out, it has to be supported with the same amount of vigor as any other software package, and frankly, the team isn't big enough to handle that load, and the cost-benefit analysis points to sticking to 32-bit for at least one more version.
Actually, the misconception is brought upon by how Windows Update, when you want to do it manually, required Internet Explorer on Windows XP and in some cases on Windows 2003. Hence people are under the belief of that.

As for 64 bit, you are right, they won't make an effort to really support it until there is a high demand.
And that is why I make an effort to dispel these myths. If someone wants to argue a point, then they should, at least, know a bit about the point they are arguing. These were the same lame arguments used by the trade rags to rip Vista.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
15 Nov 2010   #192
Dilbert8056

Win 7 32 & 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ICit2lol View Post
Well it seemed ok to me but being a Limey in Oz the only thing wrong was the grammar of Non's alternative - Should it would be have named ooooh bit double dutch as we used to ay in the UK when I lived there. Liked -
"Comparison Test - Advantage from x64 To x32 OS - EXPLANATION" myself but that's eing a bit pedantic eh?
Damn good read especially for me as I have just switched over to 64 on my Toshy laptop (was an option in factory default). One thing that stood out was the amount of RAM that can be accessed - I suppose I read it correctly - 8Tb can be adressed? Would I be right in thinking that would be a very large external device hooked up something like Readyboost? The same goes for the 192Gb?
A bit off topic but does readyboost work with 64bit stuff as I tried 2Gb extra and no appreciable difference.
Anyway must stop - given to rambling - still top read.
Joh
You will be limited by your chipset/memory controller. For example, the P55 chipset can only address 16*GB* RAM.

Dil
My System SpecsSystem Spec
15 Nov 2010   #193
ICIT2LOL

Desk1 7 Home Prem / Desk2 10 Pro / Main lap Asus ROG 10 Pro 2 laptop Toshiba 7 Pro Asus P2520 7 & 10
 
 
Chipset / memory controller

Now Dil you have me at an disadvantage here being a (I think so) fairly good health professional but not so hot on computer workings. I have gathered over the last week that memory is not confined to the RAM sticks, but also the ?cache inbult mobo memory etc etc and their controllers ( I thought only HDD's had these ). As for the chipset if I knew what I was looking for I could tell you what I have got.

My desktop machine is a very basic prebuilt from a company here in Australia and my laptop a Toshiba Sat L550 so might have to have scratch around the system details to find out eh?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

15 Nov 2010   #194
Lordbob75

Windows 7 Ultimate x64, Mint 9
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ICit2lol View Post
Now Dil you have me at an disadvantage here being a (I think so) fairly good health professional but not so hot on computer workings. I have gathered over the last week that memory is not confined to the RAM sticks, but also the ?cache inbult mobo memory etc etc and their controllers ( I thought only HDD's had these ). As for the chipset if I knew what I was looking for I could tell you what I have got.

My desktop machine is a very basic prebuilt from a company here in Australia and my laptop a Toshiba Sat L550 so might have to have scratch around the system details to find out eh?
Basically, a 64bit OS can theoretically use terabytes of RAM, but the hardware also has to support that.
In this case, he means that the maximum the motherboard can see is 16Gigs.

~Lordbob
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Nov 2010   #195
Lordbob75

Windows 7 Ultimate x64, Mint 9
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Sleepingsun View Post
I think 32 bit is more suitable for common users.
I disagree. There is literally no reason to NOT use x64 with a new computer anymore. Most come with more than 3 gigs of RAM now, and x64 drivers exist and function just fine.

~Lordbob
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Nov 2010   #196
Petey7

Windows 7 Professional SP1 64-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Lordbob75 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Sleepingsun View Post
I think 32 bit is more suitable for common users.
I disagree. There is literally no reason to NOT use x64 with a new computer anymore. Most come with more than 3 gigs of RAM now, and x64 drivers exist and function just fine.

~Lordbob
I agree with Lordbob. Drivers used to be a major issue, but not so much anymore, especially on newer computers. Also, the number of 64-bit programs is increasing constantly. Recently I decided to try to switch to all 64-bit software and there were only two programs I couldn't find a sutable alternative to. IZarc and FormatFactory. There are 64-bit alternatives, but familarity with those two kept me from switching. Besides, 32-bit programs work on 64-bit systems just fine. There is no reason not to use a 64-bit OS these days.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Nov 2010   #197
Dilbert8056

Win 7 32 & 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Lordbob75 View Post
Basically, a 64bit OS can theoretically use terabytes of RAM, but the hardware also has to support that.
In this case, he means that the maximum the motherboard can see is 16Gigs.
~Lordbob
Very well put. For example, the nForce 4 chipset has a limit of 4GB, so although it can run a 64 bit OS, there is no memory advantage...when one fits the max memory to hardware, one cannot see/use the full amount. If I fit the full 16GB in my current motherboard, I will only be able to use about 15.25-15.50.

Dil
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Nov 2010   #198
zzz2496

Windows7 Ultimate 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Dilbert8056 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Lordbob75 View Post
Basically, a 64bit OS can theoretically use terabytes of RAM, but the hardware also has to support that.
In this case, he means that the maximum the motherboard can see is 16Gigs.
~Lordbob
Very well put. For example, the nForce 4 chipset has a limit of 4GB, so although it can run a 64 bit OS, there is no memory advantage...when one fits the max memory to hardware, one cannot see/use the full amount. If I fit the full 16GB in my current motherboard, I will only be able to use about 15.25-15.50.

Dil
No, we will still have the advantage of 64bit. One of them is the capability of a process to have "User-mode virtual address space" to whatever your RAM size (we'll need some time before we can put 7/8TB of RAM in our home desktop machines). We still inherit all of 64bit security features... And many other features. The primary reason to use 64bit OS is indeed "Max RAM size", but there are many important features besides "Max RAM size".

zzz2496
My System SpecsSystem Spec
17 Nov 2010   #199
ufie89

window 7 starter
 
 

greeaaaaattt,,,,

my friends ever ask me what the differences are??

some of them force their PC to use 64 bit whereas their PC cant competible using that,,
My System SpecsSystem Spec
17 Nov 2010   #200
Lordbob75

Windows 7 Ultimate x64, Mint 9
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Sleepingsun View Post
I like this comparison. My home OS is 32bit, and office OS is 64bit.
Thanks.

~Lordbob
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 32 bit vs 64 bit Comparison




Thread Tools




Similar help and support threads
Thread Forum
Ram comparison With and Without X.M.P!
Before Without X.M.P http://s30.postimg.org/798hcmc5d/cachemem.png After With X.M.P http://s30.postimg.org/lxjdnpcld/cachemem2.png not much of a difference but not bad considering it took 30 seconds to change in the bios, and its safe! :)
PC Custom Builds and Overclocking
Motherboard Comparison, what do you think?
For a gaming computer: MSI Z87-G45 Gaming Review Page 5 - MSI Z87-G45 Specifications & Features - Overclockers Club vs. ASRock Z87 Extreme4 Motherboard | Hardware Secrets vs. http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=4518#sp All very equally priced, which one would you...
Hardware & Devices
CPU Comparison
I'm looking for a site where i can compare cpu's side by side. i know that there is one for gpu's because i've use it and pointed others to it. just not sure if there is one for cpu's. thanks in advance for any help.
Hardware & Devices
SSD comparison
This link might be of interest to those of you considering purchase of a SSD. 12 best solid state drives | News | TechRadar UK
Hardware & Devices
CPU Comparison
I have my eyes on an Intel Core 2 Quad Q8400 Now I am wondering what kind of a boost to performance would I receive in gaming terms? My specs are below..
Hardware & Devices
Performance comparison
Ive run a couple of benchmarks comparing Windows XP 32-bit vs Windows 7 64-bit. Shouldn't I be getting better fps in windows 7 64 bit? Windows 7 64 bit CSS Stress Test 94.93 HL2 Lost Coast Stress Test 60.78 COH Great, avg 54.9 max 62.1 min 33.5 Windows 7 without sidebar CSS Stress Test...
Gaming


Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:16.
Twitter Facebook Google+ Seven Forums iOS App Seven Forums Android App