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Windows 7: Need VGA/SVGA Cable 1080

27 Jan 2010   #11
valtonray

Windows 7 Ultimate Signature Edition
 
 

are you aware of VGA/SVGA's limitations? if they could support the HD resolutions there wouldn't have been a need to creat DVI or HDMI, or display port. if you really want 1080 upgrade to a graphics card that supports it.


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28 Jan 2010   #12
AngelProcesser

 

cclloyd9785, please provide images of the connectors, the ones you believe to be VGA type running 1080p. I am fascinated.
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29 Jan 2010   #13
pwhooftman

Win 7
 
 
Resolution and Definition; two different things

Am i totally off by thinking that Resolution and (Standard or High) Definition are two unrelated things?

"VGA" resolution can go up to like 2048x1536 pixels (Geforce 9400 video card) (called "VGA" because of the connector type, not the resolution)
Definition can be Standard (576 lines) or High (1080 lines, Interlaced of Progressive).

Resolution is a property of Video Cards, which display's are capable of showing, or not.
Definition is a property of the Display.

Neither are properties of the cable..., only that you can't get a VGA cable to transmit High Definition signals because those are limited to Hdmi and DVI connections...

Theoratically, a VGA cable could have a maximum resolution, because of weak shielding which would lead to ghosting in the image (i used a extension vga cable in conjunction with a normal VGA cable, totalling 3 meters in length. That did give ghosting when displaying 1920*1080 resolution)
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29 Jan 2010   #14
FliGi7

XP / Win7 x64 Pro
 
 

VGA actually refers to the static maximum pixel dimension, not inherently the cable type. It just so happens that the cable type only supports VGA and is thus named VGA due to its construction of only being able to handle that signal resolution.

Thank you for pointing out the ambiguity behind the term "resolution". Resolution typically refers to the pixel dimensions of the display (such as 1920 x 1200) and not necessarily the resolution, which is denoted in number of horizontal lines produced on the display. Of course, even this can be argued which is which.

Bottom line, don't get lost in the terms, rather understand how the different aspects of the display such as the pixels per inch, total number of pixels, aspect ratio, number of horizontal lines displayed, display technique, and refresh rate come together to form the images on the screen.

Here is a handy dandy graph that can illustrate some of this stuff...

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29 Jan 2010   #15
AngelProcesser

 

It's the port, the connector, and the cable and the amount of data each is designed to carry...yes - you can get high resolutions with VGA, but VGA will not produce a moving image of quality at those resolutions.

If you connect a VGA port using a VGA to DVI connector and a DVI cable then connect it to the DVI input on a monitor you are receiving VGA.

If you connect a DVI port using a DVI to VGA connector and a VGA cable then connect it to the VGA input on a monitor you are receiving VGA. This occurs due to what is called a handshake, a loop designed into the ports, connectors and cables that tells your output source that your input source is by what the signal is returned on the loop.

To have a DVI and more importantly here, an HDCP supported PC, you need to use DVI or HDMI components all which must meet the specifications of HDCP which includes the DVI and HDMI requirements along with proper additional hardware.

Note there are sub-specifications of the DVI standard including DVI-A, DVI-D, and DVI-I...each has a specific use and many people incorrectly mix required components (ports, connectors and cables) not realizing that in order to maintain the maximum data throughput and signals, the proper components need to be used.

You can find the pinout of your video card's ports, any DVI cable, and your monitor or TV by reviewing the technical sections of the manuals or the support area of the respective websites.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Jan 2010   #16
cclloyd9785

Windows 7 Home Premium x64, Mac OS X 10.6.2 x64
 
 

I just tested my video card using GPU-Z. It said i can go up to 2566x1899 or something like that, its my monitor (laptop) that is maxed at 1366x768.

My TV supports 1080p.

I also just noticed that on my VGA cable, 2 pins are missing.

.....
...x.
....x


That is my VGA cable. The second to last on the second line, and the last on the 3rd line is missing. Could that limit it by any chance?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Jan 2010   #17
FliGi7

XP / Win7 x64 Pro
 
 

What is the orientation above?

My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Jan 2010   #18
AngelProcesser

 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by cclloyd9785 View Post
I just tested my video card using GPU-Z. It said i can go up to 2566x1899 or something like that, its my monitor (laptop) that is maxed at 1366x768.

My TV supports 1080p.

I also just noticed that on my VGA cable, 2 pins are missing.

.....
...x.
....x

That is my VGA cable. The second to last on the second line, and the last on the 3rd line is missing. Could that limit it by any chance?
Assuming there ARE missing pins, where are they now? In a socket somewhere? Go look.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
31 Jan 2010   #19
cclloyd9785

Windows 7 Home Premium x64, Mac OS X 10.6.2 x64
 
 

Missing on both ends of the cable. on that diagram its numbers 5 and 9, if i am veiwing it correctly.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
31 Jan 2010   #20
zzz2496

Windows7 Ultimate 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by valtonray View Post
are you aware of VGA/SVGA's limitations? if they could support the HD resolutions there wouldn't have been a need to creat DVI or HDMI, or display port. if you really want 1080 upgrade to a graphics card that supports it.
"VGA" Cable is capable well above "Full HD" resolution... DVI was invented to increase the quality of image you see on a HIGH RESOLUTION computer display, eliminating "analog" characteristics of the video signals (bad/long cable = ghosting image/blurred). IBM T220/T221 are one of those displays. HDMI is the next incarnation of DVI for the CE space. It carries DVI signals (along with Audio) over a similar cable, but uses smaller, "CE" friendly connector. Along with HDMI, the MPAA people enforce the CE industry to implement HDCP (encryption machanism for the digital signal passing through the HDMI cable). Is HDCP improves image quality? NO. What HDCP for is for those pirates so that they can't create a digital perfect copy of a motion picture (this issue was hot back then in the Vista release days).

Quote:
cclloyd9785, please provide images of the connectors, the ones you believe to be VGA type running 1080p. I am fascinated.
I'm running one of my Dell 2407WFP input using an Analog VGA cable (the tiny 15 pin connector), and it works fine, the picture is normal, color all good... Running @1920x1200, it's native resolution (WELL ABOVE HD resolution).

Quote:
Am i totally off by thinking that Resolution and (Standard or High) Definition are two unrelated things?

"VGA" resolution can go up to like 2048x1536 pixels (Geforce 9400 video card) (called "VGA" because of the connector type, not the resolution)
Definition can be Standard (576 lines) or High (1080 lines, Interlaced of Progressive).

Resolution is a property of Video Cards, which display's are capable of showing, or not.
Definition is a property of the Display.

Neither are properties of the cable..., only that you can't get a VGA cable to transmit High Definition signals because those are limited to Hdmi and DVI connections...

Theoratically, a VGA cable could have a maximum resolution, because of weak shielding which would lead to ghosting in the image (i used a extension vga cable in conjunction with a normal VGA cable, totalling 3 meters in length. That did give ghosting when displaying 1920*1080 resolution)
Correct !!! "VGA" cable can support as high as 2K x 1K pixels (I forgot the exact resolution numbers, I ran that resolution once on a 21" CRT display back in the CRT days).

zzz2496

Edit: "Full HD" resolution is "normal resolution" for High Resolution computer displays (30" monsters runs @2560x1600), it's not something that's "Amazing", it's only 1920x1080 pixels... It's even a bit lower compared to my current displays... (20pixels short).
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 Need VGA/SVGA Cable 1080




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