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Windows 7: If you are still not using 64-bit operating systems you should read

08 Nov 2010   #11
pparks1

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by wilywombat View Post
Some organisations have 32 bit bespoke software running and upgrading to 64bit would incur large cost for software re-writes let alone upgrading the hardware.
32-bit software works just fine on 64-bit operating systems. What doesn't work, is 16 bit applications....that are supported with 32-bit systems.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by wilywombat View Post
As far as I can see, there is not much to be gained by the average family joe who doesn't need the power and amounts of RAM that a 64 bit windows sytem would give them the ability to run.
I tend to agree with this view. The average consumer just doesn't have a need for more than 4GB of RAM yet. Generally speaking, they don't run apps that "really" take advantage of 64-bit processors.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by swarfega View Post
This is why you have virtualisation. To easy the pain of transition until such time you are ready to go fully 64-bit when the day arrives when 32-bit is no longer fully supported.
However, in a business and such...having to run and support 2 operating systems is a real PITA for both the user and the IT staff. For home users and such, it works out alright.


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09 Nov 2010   #12
Joshatdot

Windows 7 Professional x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Rei Tumult View Post
Business will probably still be using 32 bit systems for many years to come, but consumers will most likely make the switch sooner. I'm already running my computer with Win 7 Pro 64 bit all 64 bit drivers, 64 bit Firefox, 64 bit flash player and more.
When did Adobe release a 64bit flash for Windows?


Anywho: anyone remember when 32bit architecture was released? and how long did it take before 16bit code was gone/abandoned?
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09 Nov 2010   #13
yowanvista

Windows 10 Pro x64, Arch Linux
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Joshatdot View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Rei Tumult View Post
Business will probably still be using 32 bit systems for many years to come, but consumers will most likely make the switch sooner. I'm already running my computer with Win 7 Pro 64 bit all 64 bit drivers, 64 bit Firefox, 64 bit flash player and more.
When did Adobe release a 64bit flash for Windows?
It was released at the same time when IE9b was released(15 September)
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09 Nov 2010   #14
mikedl

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by yowanvista View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Joshatdot View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Rei Tumult View Post
Business will probably still be using 32 bit systems for many years to come, but consumers will most likely make the switch sooner. I'm already running my computer with Win 7 Pro 64 bit all 64 bit drivers, 64 bit Firefox, 64 bit flash player and more.
When did Adobe release a 64bit flash for Windows?
It was released at the same time when IE9b was released(15 September)
You are absolutely correct, Yowan. And a preview 2 "Square" was pre-released on September 27th.

I think Joshatdot was splitting hairs with regard to a "release" version, the term of which was not mentioned in Rei's post.

I'm running FF 64bit and Flash 64 bit as my daily browser just as Rei is doing.
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09 Nov 2010   #15
jimbo45

Linux CENTOS 7 / various Windows OS'es and servers
 
 

Hi there
this misses the point.
Some very USEFUL old legacy hardware is still currently in use -- no W7 drivers will appear as the original manufacturers may have gone out of business or the hardware is considered obsolete so no updates will be made.

For example some Canon LIDE photoscanners, some PLOTTER hardware / CAD drawing equipment, ripping CD / other audio to MiniDiscs -- still quite widely used in professional broadcasting / music circles - for example a lot of high end TASCAM recorders use Minidiscs - etc etc.

For these devices XP will stay around for a LONG time even if only run under a Virtual Machine.

Most typical users of computers - basically using a computer for Internet browsing, playing multi-media, ripping music to mp3 players etc, doing email and simple office apps don't need even the power of today's basic hardware.

Even a small old laptop has more compute power than the entire compute power of the Allies combined in the 1939-1945 World War II and certainly more than NASA had for the Apollo moon landings.

Corporations also need TIME to test their BACK OFFICE stuff before rolling out new OS'es too.

Cheers
jimbo
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09 Nov 2010   #16
Ravanx

Windows 7 Pro
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Capt.Jack Sparrow View Post
Quote:
From time to time I meet customers that are using older operating systems that are not 64-bit. Before I go any further let me give you the perspective:
· X86 Platform: This is the original PC platform that we used to use back in 1980’s. It has a maximum support for 4 GB RAM.
· I64 Platform (Itanium): This is the 64-bit platform which appeared first on stage and was modeled after a different architecture. It has support for much higher memory but is only available on expensive hardware. Due to architectural differences it needs to emulate x86 instructions in software and old applications written for x86 run much slower.
· X64 Platform: This is the 64-bit platform that has now become mainstream. It is using a similar architecture with x86 and can run older applications on hardware. It does support much higher memory. The rest of this blog this is the platform that I will refer to when I use 64-bit.
More: If you are still not using 64-bit operating systems you should read this - Murat Cudi Erenturk, Insights of an Architect - Site Home - TechNet Blogs
Not really true. Some programs and drivers don't work with 64-bit Windows at all and this just keeps giving troubles. I know because I have both 32-bit and 64-bit.
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09 Nov 2010   #17
wds7

WDS 7 Home Pre.x64
 
 

As I understand ...unless i have more than 4GB of Mem..
I will not see any improvement by switching to 64Bit OS .... right...?
Some one clear my head please ....Thanks ...
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09 Nov 2010   #18
MWRed

Windows 7 Home Premium
 
 

My main issue is this.......MONEY.
I have no need at all for anything more than what I have now. Sure, it's an old system, but for what I do, it's fine. I'll get a laptop soon, and it'll probably be x64, but I still have no need for it to be x64.


I've had the same arguments about phones. I use my phone mostly as a.......you guessed it, PHONE. That's what it is, and it's kinda tiring having these ungodly expensive Smartphones with contracts shoved in my face just because of "all they can do". Well, that's nice and all, but I have NO need for any of that. But ur gonna try to convince me that I need it anyway? I think not.
Just like the x86/x64 platform, it would just be a waste of money for something that I don't need.
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10 Nov 2010   #19
tcolguin

Windows 7 Home Premium 32bit
 
 
The question should be why go to 64 bit when you don't have to?

Sure if you are going to need to do virtual machines or heavy video processing or something else that needs lots of memory then sure go get it, but if you don't why use it? The reason not to use it is long.

1) Manufactures develop and test their 32 bit drivers first not to mention old hardware may never get a 64 bit version.
2) Software is developed and tested first on 32 bit. Don't think so what about that 64 bit Adobe Reader? What about the 64 bit Quicken (doesn't exist), I could name lots more, but the point is just because a 32 bit application can run on 64 bits doesn't mean you need to run it there. There is more chances that it won't work right. There is no speed improvement.
3) 64 bit uses 1.25 to 1.5 more disk space and memory.
4) The 64 bit OS by definition has to run in 32 bit and 64 bit modes. This is more complications that can go wrong and also lead to confusion when trying to solve a problem. A person has a problem accessing a web site with IE. You are trying to help them, but right away you have a problem are they using the 32 bit or the 64 bit IE (sometimes it matters!). You ask which are you using the 64 bit or 32 bit? And their answer is "Huh?". You see not everyone out there is a geek that understand all this they just run the web browser. And even you are dealing with someone that knows the 64 bit browser from the 32 bit browser, what to you tell them when something works on the 32 bit browser, but not the 64 bit? Do the same for any other application, but now the user might have a just A: just a 32 bit application, B: just a 64 bit application, C: both. And along with each of those applications you get different registry entries, and shared data folders, ...

So tell me again why the question shouldn't be why are you using a 64 bit OS when you have no need other then the salesman said it was the "best" or because some geek friend recommended it because they always like the "newest" and "greatest"?

I have over 30+ years experience in software and hardware. I have machines that can be run in 64 bit mode, I have access to both the 32 and 64 bit Windows DVD. I choose to install 32 bit Windows 7 on my machine because I have no need for the 64 bit.

I remember seeing an article about talk of a 128 bit processor and all the geeks were like "Oh I got to have that" or "In 5 years everyone will be running 128 bit". Some time look up how much memory you can access with a 64 bit processor and try to imagine why anything other the a Super Super computer (or "world database") would need this.
(answer for 64 bits: 18446744073709551616 bytes)
(One Terabyte is: 1099511627776 bytes)
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10 Nov 2010   #20
tcolguin

Windows 7 Home Premium 32bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by wds7 View Post
As I understand ...unless i have more than 4GB of Mem..
I will not see any improvement by switching to 64Bit OS .... right...?
Some one clear my head please ....Thanks ...
You will not see an improvement. What's more even if you have more memory you might not see any improvement. A program needs what it needs and no more. If I run Quicken it needs about 100 Meg, I could have a terabyte of memory and it wouldn't do any better. As long as everything you do fits in the memory you have, getting more memory will not help.

And running in 64 bit mode is not faster then running in 32 bit mode.
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 If you are still not using 64-bit operating systems you should read




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