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Windows 7: If you are still not using 64-bit operating systems you should read

10 Nov 2010   #21
Darician

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
 
 

At work, we run Windows 7 Professional 32-bit because although our computers can technically run 64-bit, there are no audio drivers for the 64-bit version and there is some software we support that does not support 64-bit at the moment. Additionally, these PCs only have 1 GB of RAM so we would see no benefit.

At home, I run Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit because I have 4 GB of RAM and to fully take advantage of it, I need to run a 64-bit OS. I don't really a huge performance increment going from 32-bit to 64-bit as I don't really run data intensive applications that require a lot of RAM.


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10 Nov 2010   #22
jimbo45

Linux CENTOS 7 / various Windows OS'es and servers
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by tcolguin View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by wds7 View Post
As I understand ...unless i have more than 4GB of Mem..
I will not see any improvement by switching to 64Bit OS .... right...?
Some one clear my head please ....Thanks ...
You will not see an improvement. What's more even if you have more memory you might not see any improvement. A program needs what it needs and no more. If I run Quicken it needs about 100 Meg, I could have a terabyte of memory and it wouldn't do any better. As long as everything you do fits in the memory you have, getting more memory will not help.

And running in 64 bit mode is not faster then running in 32 bit mode.
Actually the part about 64 bit mode not faster than 32 bit mode running is not always true if the 32 bit application is running on a 64 bit cpu.

If you have a 64 bit CPU then you need at least 2 instruction cycles to load 32 bit code plus the extra instruction decode time and pre-fetch execution.

With 64 bit mode all this overhead is carried out NATIVELY in One cycle by the CPU.

It's not quite as simple as that in practice but you should get the idea.

You will of course need native 64 bit applications to benefit but I'd suggest even on a 2GB RAM system try running the 64 bit version of Photoshop CS4/CS5 compared with the 32 bit version .

Running 32 bit code natively on a 32 bit machine is another story however but here you can run into severe limitations of addressing space when dealing with large data bases / indexes etc etc.

For the average joe at the present time probably a 2GB machine running 32 bit W7 and 32 bit applications is fine -- but remember eventually even for the basic user faster apps and more storage will always be needed -- even if not for several years yet.

Cheers
jimbo
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10 Nov 2010   #23
madtownidiot

 

I disagree totally with the view that the average user doesn't need a 64bit os or more than 4GB RAM. The average user should have a 64 bit operating system and as much ram as possible in order to be able to run all the bloat installed by the factory and all the additional user installed bloat without their system bogging down, until they learn how to remove it, in which case 64 bit windows 7 ultimate will run without a hitch with the minimum recommended 2GB even on a system that is officially not supported by the manufacturer for windows 7

Edit... but only if you have a 64 bit capable CPU
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10 Nov 2010   #24
Mercurial

Windows 7 32bit RTM
 
 

hey I still use Pentium 4 XDDDDD
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10 Nov 2010   #25
madtownidiot

 

It that case.. you don't have any choice but to use a 32bit OS
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10 Nov 2010   #26
wds7

WDS 7 Home Pre.x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by tcolguin View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by wds7 View Post
As I understand ...unless i have more than 4GB of Mem..
I will not see any improvement by switching to 64Bit OS .... right...?
Some one clear my head please ....Thanks ...
You will not see an improvement. What's more even if you have more memory you might not see any improvement. A program needs what it needs and no more. If I run Quicken it needs about 100 Meg, I could have a terabyte of memory and it wouldn't do any better. As long as everything you do fits in the memory you have, getting more memory will not help.

And running in 64 bit mode is not faster then running in 32 bit mode.
Cool ...Thanks for clearing my head .....
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10 Nov 2010   #27
jimbo45

Linux CENTOS 7 / various Windows OS'es and servers
 
 

Hi there
a LOT of specialized hardware like Lab equipment, Field equipment, and other stuff that I've mentioned before etc are often attached to laptops as specialized peripheral devices. Some of these are still woking on Windows 2000 and even Windows 98.

These can be quite expensive and "one off" type devices -- a lot of these were designed a long time ago -- no 64 bit drivers are ever likely to see the light of day.

64 bit OS'es will come into their own when the demand is there which it clearly is NOT at the moment -- not at least amongst the average joe.

Users of this excellent Forum unfortunately represent only a TINY TINY minority of computer users.

Cheers
jimbo
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10 Nov 2010   #28
sygnus21

Windows 10 Pro
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Capt.Jack Sparrow View Post
Quote:
From time to time I meet customers that are using older operating systems that are not 64-bit. Before I go any further let me give you the perspective:
· X86 Platform: This is the original PC platform that we used to use back in 1980’s. It has a maximum support for 4 GB RAM.
· I64 Platform (Itanium): This is the 64-bit platform which appeared first on stage and was modeled after a different architecture. It has support for much higher memory but is only available on expensive hardware. Due to architectural differences it needs to emulate x86 instructions in software and old applications written for x86 run much slower.
· X64 Platform: This is the 64-bit platform that has now become mainstream. It is using a similar architecture with x86 and can run older applications on hardware. It does support much higher memory. The rest of this blog this is the platform that I will refer to when I use 64-bit.
More: If you are still not using 64-bit operating systems you should read this - Murat Cudi Erenturk, Insights of an Architect - Site Home - TechNet Blogs
Good post. And I get the point

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by jimbo45 View Post
Users of this excellent Forum unfortunately represent only a TINY TINY minority of computer users.
Great point and completely agree.

We need to realize the larger mass doesn't need what we have. And for the most part this is an enthusiast forum. Not everyone is a computer geek like us.
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10 Nov 2010   #29
WindowsStar

Windows 7 Enterprise (x64); Windows Server 2008 R2 (x64)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by pparks1 View Post
However, in a business and such...having to run and support 2 operating systems is a real PITA for both the user and the IT staff. For home users and such, it works out alright.
Agreed, however we selected to bypass Windows Vista and went straight to Windows 7 64-bit.

We have 2 OS's to support Windows XP Pro (x86) and Windows 7 Enterprise (x64).

I agree it is a PITA but it beats what other companies did; by supporting: Windows XP Pro (x86); Windows XP Pro (x64); Windows XP Tablet (x86); Windows Vista (x86); Windows Vista (x64); Windows Vista Enterprise (x86); Windows Vista Enterprise (x64); Windows Vista Ultimate (x86); Windows Vista Ultimate (x64); Windows 7 Ultimate (x86); Windows 7 Ultimate (x64); Windows 7 Pro (x86); Windows 7 Pro (x64); Windows 7 Enterprise (x86); and Windows 7 Enterprise (x64). Not to mention any of the lingering older OS's.

We had to make an extreme hard choice (due to compatibility, old software, old browser requirements, etc.) but a decision had to be made. We had to have the CIO, CFO, and all upper management understand the tremendous support issues we would have without standardizing on Windows XP Pro (x86) and Windows 7 Enterprise (x64). All new purchases are Windows 7 Enterprise (x64) unless there is just no way to run all the software on Windows 7. So far we have had great luck with this and we hope to future proof ourselves. It must be noted that we will skip Windows 8, because of the support issues, staff, etc. We have had a great 10 year run with Windows XP Pro (x86) and would like to push Windows 7 to a 6 to 10 year run if possible.
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10 Nov 2010   #30
WindowsStar

Windows 7 Enterprise (x64); Windows Server 2008 R2 (x64)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by tcolguin View Post
Sure if you are going to need to do virtual machines or heavy video processing or something else that needs lots of memory then sure go get it, but if you don't why use it? The reason not to use it is long.

1) Manufactures develop and test their 32 bit drivers first not to mention old hardware may never get a 64 bit version.
2) Software is developed and tested first on 32 bit. Don't think so what about that 64 bit Adobe Reader? What about the 64 bit Quicken (doesn't exist), I could name lots more, but the point is just because a 32 bit application can run on 64 bits doesn't mean you need to run it there. There is more chances that it won't work right. There is no speed improvement.
3) 64 bit uses 1.25 to 1.5 more disk space and memory.
4) The 64 bit OS by definition has to run in 32 bit and 64 bit modes. This is more complications that can go wrong and also lead to confusion when trying to solve a problem. A person has a problem accessing a web site with IE. You are trying to help them, but right away you have a problem are they using the 32 bit or the 64 bit IE (sometimes it matters!). You ask which are you using the 64 bit or 32 bit? And their answer is "Huh?". You see not everyone out there is a geek that understand all this they just run the web browser. And even you are dealing with someone that knows the 64 bit browser from the 32 bit browser, what to you tell them when something works on the 32 bit browser, but not the 64 bit? Do the same for any other application, but now the user might have a just A: just a 32 bit application, B: just a 64 bit application, C: both. And along with each of those applications you get different registry entries, and shared data folders, ...

So tell me again why the question shouldn't be why are you using a 64 bit OS when you have no need other then the salesman said it was the "best" or because some geek friend recommended it because they always like the "newest" and "greatest"?

I have over 30+ years experience in software and hardware. I have machines that can be run in 64 bit mode, I have access to both the 32 and 64 bit Windows DVD. I choose to install 32 bit Windows 7 on my machine because I have no need for the 64 bit.
Wow! I remember this argument almost word for word 10 years ago when we were deploying Windows XP (x86) {32bit}. All you have to do is substitute 16bit for 32bit and 32bit for 64bit and the post reads the same.

The point I am making is that 10 years from now 64bit will be the standard and we will all be saying the same about 128bit OSs. What needs to be remembered is that with new architecture comes new challenges but with that change we typically move into a better place. Remember how bad Windows 3.1/95/98 was and how great Windows XP is???
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 If you are still not using 64-bit operating systems you should read




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