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Windows 7: It’s official: Asia’s just run out of IPv4 Addresses

16 Apr 2011   #11
ionbasa

Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Skcorps View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by imeem View Post
yeah what happened to IPV6 anyways?
Don't we *have* to switch to it fairly soon, since IPs in general are running out? Unless there's an IPv7 or whatever in the works.
Actualy whats hapening is that ipv4 is almost ran out and we are trying to switch to ipv6.

Quick example:
here is an example of ipv4:
nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn where n=0-9
so 10^12 =1000000000000 adresses


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
18 Apr 2011   #12
jimbo45

Linux CENTOS 7 / various Windows OS'es and servers
 
 

Hi there
why don't they just change IP addresses to Telephone Numbers -- these ALWAYS work and the telcos seem to be able to know what to do when they need more.

actually if you include things like extension numbers etc I think even TODAY most computer systems allow 18 digits for a complete telphone number.

This should provide enough numbers for the time being -- and the same telcos are quite good in re-assigning unused numbers.

Another advantage is that people could get FIXED "IP" addresses -- should make tracking illegal downloads etc much easier.

Why people haven't investigated this line of approach I can't understand -- maybe its TOO SIMPLE.

Cheers
jimbo
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18 Apr 2011   #13
pparks1

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by imeem View Post
yeah what happened to IPV6 anyways?
You will start to see it soon. Your Windows 7 computer no doubt has it installed and you even have an ipv6 address.

I've actually had to attend a couple of webinars for data centers we use that are moving to ipv6 addressing space in the next few months. I've actually got an IPv6 book on my desk at work that I need to start reading soon, as soon as I finish my vSphere 4 book.

In order to get IPv6 up and running, you either need to deploy a whole separate infrastructure or design and run a "dual stack" setup on your existing infrastructure. It seems to me that tech admins and such didn't want to bother with rolling this out with all of the other things they likely have had going on with cutback, and loss of staff and such. I haven't been avoiding it because I don't want it to come, but frankly just have far too much other stuff which has taken priority thus far. But it seems that learning about ipv6 and planning for it is getting nearer to the top of my list.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

18 Apr 2011   #14
Buddahfan

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 
Ran A Test for IPv6 Connectivity

Quote:
Your IPv4 address on the public internet appears to be xxxxx
Your IPv6 address on the public internet appears to be xxxxxxx

Your IPv6 service appears to be: Teredo

10/11 tests run
1. You appear to be able to browse the IPv4 internet only. You will not be able to reach IPv6-only sites.
2. Your IPv6 connection appears to be using Teredo, a type of IPv4/IPv6 gateway; currently it connects only to direct IP's. Your browser will not be able to go to IPv6 sites by name. This means the current configuration is not useful for browsing IPv6 web sites. [more info]
3. Your DNS server (possibly run by your ISP) appears to have no access to the IPv6 internet, or is not configured to use it. This may in the future restrict your ability to reach IPv6-only sites. [more info]

Your readiness scores
1. 10/10 for your IPv4 stability and readiness, when publishers offer both IPv4 and IPv6
2. 0/10 for your IPv6 stability and readiness, when publishers are forced to go IPv6 only

About your IPv4-only internet service.
This FAQ has been produced to try and address the questions of IPv4 only users

More about your test results
It looks like you have only IPv4 internet service at this time. Don't feel bad - most people are in this position right now. Most internet service providers are not quite yet ready to provide IPv6 internet to residential customers.
The good news is, nothing will suddenly break. When web sites offer their content on both IPv4 and IPv6, you'll still reach them using your existing IPv4 internet service.
You also appear to have Teredo enabled. You did successfully connect to an IPv6 site during this test - but only when forcing the connection by connecting to an IPv6 numeric address, instead of a web site name. This setting will not help or hurt you going forward to reach IPv6 web sites.
Teredo (a tunneling protocol for Windows computers) advice will be posted hopefully soon.

Don't stress too much on having an IPv6 address in 2011. If you do buy a new router, make sure that it will be IPv6 ready (or upgradable) when your service provider does offer IPv6.
Link to test
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19 Apr 2011   #15
abuttino

Windows 7 RTM x86/x64
 
 

Just so you know, we would have to populate the earth with 1,000,000,000 devices per metric ton of earth before we needed ipv7
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19 Apr 2011   #16
Buddahfan

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by abuttino View Post
Just so you know, we would have to populate the earth with 1,000,000,000 devices per metric ton of earth before we needed ipv7
It seems to me that we be using Windows 8 long before we are using IPv8
My System SpecsSystem Spec
20 Apr 2011   #17
Layback Bear

Windows 10 Pro. 64/ version 1709
 
 

Asia runs out of everything except people and it seem that people are causing the problem.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
21 Apr 2011   #18
wilywombat

win7
 
 

How long before we see cheap chinese clones of IP addresses available for sale on Ebay??!!!!!!!!
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28 Apr 2011   #19
Buddahfan

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 
Microsoft Heats Up IPv4 Market

Quote:
Microsoft Heats Up IPv4 Market

The $7.5 million acquisition of 666,624 IPv4 addresses from Nortel shows that there's a growing market for the dwindling commodity.

By Chandler Harris InformationWeek
April 28, 2011 11:14 AM

With the current address block of Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) quickly dwindling, some analysts believe companies could soon begin paying a high premium for address space.

The acquisition by Microsoft last month of 666,624 IPv4 addresses from Nortel for $7.5 million, or $11.25 per address, highlighted what could be a reality for businesses looking to expand their IPv4 in the coming months or years. While IP addresses are currently free--for those companies that show a need, which Microsoft could not--they may be costly once the free supply expires by the end of the year. .............

Still, most providers still have IPv4 allocations to last many months or years, which means it will take some time before enterprises and consumers end up bidding and paying for addresses like Microsoft did, Labovitz said. Still, the IPv4 shortage has other costs, he said.
As mentioned earlier

Quote:
The solution to the upcoming shortage is a migration to IPv6, the new frontier of the Internet. IPv4 uses 32-bit addresses and can support about 4.3 billion devices. IPv6 uses 128-bit addresses and can support trillions of devices.
I wonder if those trillions is more or less than the U.S. Debt will be by Jan 2013?

cont on link
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Apr 2011   #20
Firestrider

Linux (Debian, Android)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ionbasa View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Skcorps View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by imeem View Post
yeah what happened to IPV6 anyways?
Don't we *have* to switch to it fairly soon, since IPs in general are running out? Unless there's an IPv7 or whatever in the works.
Actualy whats hapening is that ipv4 is almost ran out and we are trying to switch to ipv6.

Quick example:
here is an example of ipv4:
nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn where n=0-9
so 10^12 =1000000000000 adresses
Actually IPv4 supports 2^32 = 4.3 billion public addresses, and IPv6 = 2^128 = 340 undecillion public addresses.

Anything behind a router that uses NAT would be using private IP addresses, so you could have multiple computers (with multiple private IP addresses) using 1 public IP address.
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 It’s official: Asia’s just run out of IPv4 Addresses




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