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Windows 7: Major ISPs agree to "six strikes" copyright enforcement plan

02 Oct 2011   #61
jimbo45

Linux CENTOS 7 / various Windows OS'es and servers
 
 

Hi all
This has just abot run its course -- you basically have 2 sets of incompatable people - Those who will acquire anything they want via torrents and those who don't.

There is NO way technically to prevent people from "file sharing" as methods from simple "Snail Mail" to anonymous proxies, dynamic / hidden IP addresses (and a bit of other technology) can always be used which will thwart even the most aggressive searchers.

Let the Lawyers do their own thing and you do yours -- It would be far far better if a lot of content was LEGALLY available as well -- such as really ending the stupid regionalisation / region codes on DVD's (easily fixable), Movies shown in different countries with totally long periods between the release dates and options to play content on whatever medium I choose.

I trave a lot --it's much easier to store movies on a small external HDD than carry around a load of DVD's -- why should I be penalized for duplicating a DVD I'VE PAID FOR on to a HDD --and why should I only be allowed to play it in a specific region.


Until things like this are fixed I sympathize with the "Torrenters" even though I don't really condone their use except for legal applications likeNew Linux release distributions etc.

Cheers
jimbo


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02 Oct 2011   #62
nickyoung

Windows 7 Ultimate x32
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by jimbo45 View Post
Hi all
There is NO way technically to prevent people from "file sharing" as methods from simple "Snail Mail" to anonymous proxies, dynamic / hidden IP addresses (and a bit of other technology) can always be used which will thwart even the most aggressive searchers......
Correct. It's logistically more efficient to "file-share". That's what this world wasn't prepared for - A giant exodus of information. The power of sharing information, whether it be media or news, without financial/cultural/social barriers, has allowed our world to regain a healthy balance and diverse outlook on life - the key to ending war and hatred across borders. So if you ask me personally, I'd say "illegal file sharing has done the greater good of bringing this world together" unintentionally.

All this talk of copyright and legality is about as exciting as watching congress delay raising the debt ceiling. After all, if you are a good musician, get out there and be heard. Too many people chase this absurd dream of making Internet Millions via intangible methods such as content licensing etc... At the end of the day, people will pay for bandwidth/hosting, and not some invisible license.
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02 Oct 2011   #63
boohbah

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 7600
 
 

The latest media report revealed that the entertaining industry developed a new tactic, which includes sending out notification e-mails to suspected copyright violators in the United States. Such notifications are sent out by a law firm residing in Los Angeles. The outfit named Digital Rights Corps is currently informing the recipients that they might have to pay up to $150,000 because of their unauthorized activities. However, the company offers the Internet users to settle for just $10. The settlement is justified by a legal release that the infringers will receive from the rights holder.

The warning letters describe the dramatic situation and offer the recipients click on the provided link in order to login to the automated settlement system established by the law firm. At the system, the suspected infringers are able to settle for $10 per each case of infringement. As a result, they will get a legal release from the rights holder.

Local media were quite interested in the provided scheme, though it wasn’t entirely new. The difference is that earlier law firms suggested the infringers to settle for a far bigger amount. Digital Rights Corps’ representatives gave an interview, saying that they are currently monitoring file-sharing websites in order to obtain IP addresses of the suspected pirates. Internet service providers are afterward informed and advised to send settlement offers. Of course, Rightscorps takes its cut from those settlements, but during the interview they didn’t reveal how many of these settlements had already been made.

Although, as has been already said, it’s not the first time when the companies make use of such methods, up to date the $10 settlement model may be regarded as a very successful one. However, the legitimacy of this approach is still questionable.
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02 Oct 2011   #64
seekermeister

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

Sounds a lot like the way that spammers operate...click here. The fact that the "discovery" of violators is left in the hands of a bunch of lawyers, who can only prosper by finding as many culprits as they can, and that coupled with my opinion of lawyers in general, does not make me like any of this any better. One has to wonder what happens when someone chooses not to click their link? Obviously, for the lawyers to sate their appetite (were that possible), it would be necessary for them to send out millions of their notices. That fact leads me to believe that a lot of people that never even used a torrents website at all, will be receiving those notices.
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02 Oct 2011   #65
lehnerus2000

W7 Ultimate SP1, LM18.2 MATE, W10 Home, #All 64 bit
 
 
Guilty conscience

They may as well send them to everyone.
"Let's see who's got a guilty conscience."

There were a bunch of scammers in Australia, who were sending bills to businesses for work which had never been performed (I think it may have been advertising flyers).
I believe that they even had a disclaimer (at the bottom) saying that no payment was required, if no work had been done.
I think they made 100s of 1000s of dollars.
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05 Oct 2011   #66
Borg 386

Win 7 32 Home Premium, Win 7 64 Pro, Win 8.1, Win 10
 
 

Wait a minute...only $10. I have to wonder what you're admitting and what rights you're giving up when you sign the papers to settle...and could this be used against you in the future (down the road, they bring up in court that you freely admitted to doing it).

Also, gotta love the wording, the fact that you "might" be guilty & "might" have to pay.

I don't doubt this will work, people will panic and pay, but I'm just saying that's a surprisingly low amount. Best to be wary of that little offer...
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05 Oct 2011   #67
seekermeister

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

By settling in that fashion, you would have to sign something that would establish a "guilt record", making it easier for them to prosecute you in a true court, for a real crime, if they later decided that you relapsed into "sin". You would be supplying the materials for your own gallows.

EDIT: I now see that you had already suggested this yourself, but it doesn't hurt to repeat it.
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05 Oct 2011   #68
seekermeister

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

For anyone that might be under the mistaken impression that the ISPs would not participate in something like this without good reason, I have a little story to tell. Back in 2001, when I was living in my own house, someone came to the window to my office in the back of the house late one night, and started banging on the glass, shining a flashlight through the venetian blinds.

I went to the back door, and was greeted by a Cox representative and a pack of ~ 5 local off-duty uniformed policemen, which accused me of illegally tapping into and using Cox Cable, and demanding entry to the house for inspection. I told them that I could not prevent them from entering, but would not give them permission to do so. That infuriated them because they knew they had no legal right to even be on my property. Yet that did not deter them from trying to intimidate me for about half an hour, hoping that I would cave in.

When I stated that I had never had any cable service from them, the rep lied and said that I had had service, but terminated it ~ one year previously. The truth is that when I bought the house, 3 years previously, I had cut the connector to the cable and shoved it back through the hole in my floor, to get it out of my way. The police wrote me a ticket for cable theft, for which I had to go to court the month later, but there was no trial, because my lawyer got the charge dismissed. Had I appeared without a lawyer, I'm certain that they would have proceeded to prosecute.

The moral of the story is that ISPs do not necessarily have any morals, and will do anything that they believe best serves their own ambitions. At the time, I promised myself that I would never do business with that company, but now I am a Cox customer, simply because they are the only cable service in town.
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06 Oct 2011   #69
serpentracer

windows 7 ultimate 64 bit
 
 

this is what happens when you let corporations have full say of what you can do on the internet...say hello to your new internet.

click on "who wants to get rid of net neutrality" interesting to see the same companies listed here...
Frequently Asked Questions | Save the Internet
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06 Oct 2011   #70
serpentracer

windows 7 ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by jimbo45 View Post
Hi all
This has just abot run its course -- you basically have 2 sets of incompatable people - Those who will acquire anything they want via torrents and those who don't.

There is NO way technically to prevent people from "file sharing" as methods from simple "Snail Mail" to anonymous proxies, dynamic / hidden IP addresses (and a bit of other technology) can always be used which will thwart even the most aggressive searchers.

Let the Lawyers do their own thing and you do yours -- It would be far far better if a lot of content was LEGALLY available as well -- such as really ending the stupid regionalisation / region codes on DVD's (easily fixable), Movies shown in different countries with totally long periods between the release dates and options to play content on whatever medium I choose.

I trave a lot --it's much easier to store movies on a small external HDD than carry around a load of DVD's -- why should I be penalized for duplicating a DVD I'VE PAID FOR on to a HDD --and why should I only be allowed to play it in a specific region.


Until things like this are fixed I sympathize with the "Torrenters" even though I don't really condone their use except for legal applications likeNew Linux release distributions etc.

Cheers
jimbo

first of all it's 100% legal for you to put your movie on your computer or any HDD. (in the united states it is anyway) some blue ray discs now come with a digital copy for just this reason.

there is a thing called net neutrality. which guarantee's everyone has the same speeds accessing the internet (not talking about your download speed). but there are several large corporations (isp's and telephone companies) that want full control over net neutrality to basically do away with it.
with the dispersal of Net Neutrality (the same companies that are named in this story) have a more sinister way of controlling your activities.
basically they intend to choke down any site or content from their competitors. unless they pay them a fee to have higher uploading capabilities. And I'm sure they've figured out how to slow down your torrent activities. which is why they've lobbied so hard and spend millions to get control of the internet. and they're winning. The FCC has already caved to a lot of their requests.
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 Major ISPs agree to "six strikes" copyright enforcement plan




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