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Windows 7: Intel demos Light Peak equipped laptop at IDF

14 Apr 2010   #1
Airbot

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
 
 
Intel demos Light Peak equipped laptop at IDF

Quote:
Last September, Intel announced a high-speed optical cable interface for PCs called Light Peak that promised a 10Gb/s transfer rate -- or twice the speed of USB 3.0 -- with the potential ability to scale to 100Gb/s in the next ten years.
more..


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14 Apr 2010   #2
maranello

Windows 8.1 x64 Enterprise
 
 

yep, sure sound nice, no more piles of cables and i guess that it won't be so expansive
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14 Apr 2010   #3
IggyAZ

Windows 7 Ultimate (64 bit)
 
 
What's next after USB 3.0?

Intel Says Its Light Peak Optical Cables May Succeed USB

Owen Fletcher, IDG News Service
Apr 14, 2010 9:30 am
Intel sees its Light Peak technology for linking devices by optical cable as potentially succeeding USB 3.0, a change that in several years could mean the disappearance of a port used almost universally in gadgets today.
Intel, which announced Light Peak last year, hopes it will be broadly used by devices ranging from PCs to consumer electronics and other gadgets, said Kevin Kahn, an Intel senior fellow, in a speech at the Intel Developer Forum (IDF) in Beijing. Intel will make the technology available late this year and expects partners to start shipping devices with it next year, Kahn said.
"We view this as a logical future successor to USB 3.0," Kahn said. "In some sense we'd... like to build the last cable you'll ever need."
A trend toward optical instead of electrical links raises the risk that separate optical cables could appear for many protocols, such as USB and serial ATA, said Justin Rattner, the head of Intel Labs, on the sidelines of IDF. Light Peak can run multiple protocols at the same time over one line, so all the data meant for the separate cables could run through one Light Peak cable instead.
USB is currently widely used to link between devices. Gadgets often made with USB ports include computers, mobile phones, digital cameras and external hard drives.
Intel insists there is no conflict between the two technologies. The company sees Light Peak and USB 3.0 as complementary, as Light Peak enables USB and other protocols to run together on a single, longer cable and at higher speeds in the future, according to a slide in Kahn's IDF presentation. "We expect both to exist together in the market and perhaps on the same platform at the same time," the slide said.
A laptop with Light Peak built in was on show during Kahn's speech. A long, thin Light Peak cable, which linked the laptop to a docking station and a monitor, was used simultaneously to transmit Blu-ray video, a feed from a high-definition camera and a duplication of the laptop's display onto the other screen. Light Peak can currently transfer data at a speed of 10G bps (bits per second), or fast enough to send a full Blu-Ray movie in less than half a minute, according to Intel. But the technology could be scaled up to 10 times that speed in the next decade, Intel says.
The Light Peak cable plugged into the laptop through a USB 3.0 port with components added to receive the optical signal. When asked if that would be the standard port used for Light Peak, Kahn said USB 3.0 is a likely place to start because it is common, but that "you could take the size way, way down." That could reduce the amount of space needed for a Light Peak port, a crucial consideration for small devices like handheld computers.
The laptop in the demo could still accept normal USB 3.0 devices in its USB port.
USB 3.0, the latest version of USB, is far slower than Light Peak with a signalling rate of 5G bps. But it remains much faster than the current version of USB. Still, USB 3.0 is not yet widespread in devices. That is partly because many PC manufacturers will wait on USB 3.0 until support is built directly into the chipsets they buy, which is only expected to happen late next year, according to a research note from In-Stat.
Intel, which is a major vendor of PC chipsets, did not immediately reply to a question about whether it will launch chipsets with built-in support for USB 3.0. A spokesman for rival chip maker Advanced Micro Devices said the company will have chipsets with built-in support for USB 3.0 but declined to say when.
When asked if Intel would build Light Peak support into its chipsets, Kahn said the company could do so if Light Peak spreads quickly, but declined to comment further.
Intel expects an industry group promoting Light Peak to launch next year, Kahn said. The company has said it will work with the industry to make Light Peak a standard and speed its adoption.
Intel is also looking at whether Light Peak will be relevant for data centers, but it has not reached conclusions yet, Kahn said.
Intel argues that existing electrical cable technology is approaching limits that optical technology can surpass.
"What we want to see over time is a crossover" from electrical to optical connectors, Rattner said.
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14 Apr 2010   #4
Kevlar

Windows 7 Ultimate RC Build 7100
 
 

That sounds great, maybe it will cut down on the obnoxiously long time it takes to transfer 5 gigs of movies to my external hdd...
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14 Apr 2010   #5
Zen00

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

The thing is, most peripherals don't need anything faster than USB 2, let alone 3. You don't need that much speed to use your mouse and keyboard. Really the only stuff that requires speed are external drives.
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14 Apr 2010   #6
whs
Microsoft MVP

Vista, Windows7, Mint Mate, Zorin, Windows 8
 
 

This makes a lot of sense. The fact that the industry has not developed that idea earlier shows how conservative they are. Granted it makes most sense for storage devices. But fiber optics have been around for such a long time already that it was about time they think of attaching external devices to the PCs that way. And the fact that we are talking about small distances makes the matter a lot simpler than transmitting e.g. TV programs over long distances.
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14 Apr 2010   #7
Lordbob75

Windows 7 Ultimate x64, Mint 9
 
 

I think the more useful feature will be the capability to connect from a distance. If they could use RFID or something similar, you could not only connect your iPod/phone/camera to your computer through your pocket, you could charge it while you sit at the computer!
(assuming this is a wireless light technology, not using a fiberoptic cable)

~Lordbob
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14 Apr 2010   #8
DarkDavil

7 x64/ Back-Track 4
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Zen00 View Post
The thing is, most peripherals don't need anything faster than USB 2, let alone 3. You don't need that much speed to use your mouse and keyboard. Really the only stuff that requires speed are external drives.
+1 To that - though they could possibly try to make some new sort of HDMI type cable. Those speeds are very quick - and as they said faster in next decade, so you never know. For one - i wouldn't mind a audio/vid cable being a very small wire that "just-works"
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15 Apr 2010   #9
IggyAZ

Windows 7 Ultimate (64 bit)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Zen00 View Post
The thing is, most peripherals don't need anything faster than USB 2, let alone 3. You don't need that much speed to use your mouse and keyboard. Really the only stuff that requires speed are external drives.
In post cases today you are correct.
The one thing that I can see the usefulness of USB 3 and beyond is data transfer to HD. I suspect that external HD will is and will advance more especially on the desktop level at home for backups and just more space.
I hope that the speed is both ways.
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15 Apr 2010   #10
IggyAZ

Windows 7 Ultimate (64 bit)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by whs View Post
This makes a lot of sense. The fact that the industry has not developed that idea earlier shows how conservative they are. Granted it makes most sense for storage devices. But fiber optics have been around for such a long time already that it was about time they think of attaching external devices to the PCs that way. And the fact that we are talking about small distances makes the matter a lot simpler than transmitting e.g. TV programs over long distances.

I totally agree with your statement. My career is electrical engineering and in the very near future you will see this in home building. Your switches in the walls will be fibre optic back to a central location to turn your light on. They have it now but many folks don't see the need for it compared to the cost.
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 Intel demos Light Peak equipped laptop at IDF




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