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Windows 7: Over-clocking/Warranty

07 Jun 2011   #11
sygnus21

Windows 10 Pro
 
 

It's a win win for them - they push out an item knowing it can be overclocked so people will snatch them up, but don't have to warrent them if it breaks since they never advertised you could overclock the item in the first place.

You buy & overclock, they don't have to replace it if it breaks - Income in, nothing out


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07 Jun 2011   #12
Fumz

7 Ultimate x64
 
 

There is a "law" saying you can't overclock. Intel and AMD say if you overclock the cpu, you void the warranty... that's the law.

It's actually pretty reasonable... after all, can you imagine the losses if they were to replace every cpu damaged due to user error and incompetence/ignorance?
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07 Jun 2011   #13
sygnus21

Windows 10 Pro
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Fumz View Post
It's actually pretty reasonable... after all, can you imagine the losses if they were to replace every cpu damaged due to user error and incompetence/ignorance?
Yeah they'd go out of business pretty quick on that one
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08 Jun 2011   #14
Wishmaster

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

Some manufacturers not only use OCing as a sale tactic, but also specifically state its OK to Overclock thier products without voiding your warranty.
Although I think they mean within reason. Intentionally putting double the safe MAX voltage for example may not be covered...

For example, EVGA GPUs and MOBOs.
Quote:
Question / IssueDoes overclocking void my warranty?
Answer / SolutionOverclocking our products does not void the warranty as long as there is no physical damage to the product or missing components. However EVGA Support will not be able to assist you in overclocking the product.
If you start doing extensive modifications or toss it off a building, give it a shower, etc that will void the warranty though.


Then again, some specifically state OCing will in fact Void the warranty, regardless what advertising tactics they use or are rather vague about it.
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08 Jun 2011   #15
seekermeister

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Fumz View Post
There is a "law" saying you can't overclock. Intel and AMD say if you overclock the cpu, you void the warranty... that's the law.

It's actually pretty reasonable... after all, can you imagine the losses if they were to replace every cpu damaged due to user error and incompetence/ignorance?
If a product is damaged in any fashion, including over-clocking, caused by user error, that is a reasonable basis for denying warranty service, but it is obvious that over-clocking is not necessarily the cause for all defects. Take a processor for example, it could be damaged by over-clocking, but if it were, it would be obvious due to signs of burning or possibly chipping.

I have no problem with the idea of them protecting themselves from their customer's abuse, it's just that over-clocking is not automatically a justified cause for that kind of mindset.
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08 Jun 2011   #16
Fumz

7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by seekermeister View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Fumz View Post
There is a "law" saying you can't overclock. Intel and AMD say if you overclock the cpu, you void the warranty... that's the law.

It's actually pretty reasonable... after all, can you imagine the losses if they were to replace every cpu damaged due to user error and incompetence/ignorance?
If a product is damaged in any fashion, including over-clocking, caused by user error, that is a reasonable basis for denying warranty service, but it is obvious that over-clocking is not necessarily the cause for all defects. Take a processor for example, it could be damaged by over-clocking, but if it were, it would be obvious due to signs of burning or possibly chipping.

I have no problem with the idea of them protecting themselves from their customer's abuse, it's just that over-clocking is not automatically a justified cause for that kind of mindset.
True, overclocking is not the cause of all defective cpu's... sometimes cpu's are defective when they arrive at your door. However, it's untrue that a fried cpu would show obvious signs. Yes, it could show signs, but just as often it could come out of the machine as pristine looking as when it went in.

It's not heat that kills cpus, it's volts. This is true whether you're overclocking or not. Eventually, all cpu's succumb to electromigration.

Intel can only guarantee their parts to operate for x years under a given voltage. Anything outside that voltage and it's anyone's guess as to how long the cpu will operate... and therein lies the risk... you just never know when the volts are going to kill the cpu. It's going to happen; when is the question?

Most guys who OC replace their chips long before they notice the ill effects of pushing too many volts to the core, but, guys kill brand new cpus all the time and there aren't any dramatic pics of fire and smoke, because there's just no outward signs of damage. Again, no two cpu's are alike, so, given two identical cpu's, two identical boards and identical voltage, one chip may run for the next 10 years; another, only for the next 10 weeks.

Given this reality, it's perfectly reasonable for AMD and Intel to have adopted the mindset they have.
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08 Jun 2011   #17
seekermeister

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't volts and heat tied together? Yes, I know that a processor can be overheated by poor cooling, even at normal voltage, but if properly cooled, the reason for overheating is voltage adjustment, they are the flip-side of the same coin. Evidence of overheating is obvious even to an amateur, if they know what to look for...a darkening of the PCB on the bottom. I doubt that neither AMD or Intel have crystal balls that permit them a more definitive diagnosis without dismantling a processor, and I doubt that they ever do that for an RMA inspection.
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08 Jun 2011   #18
Fumz

7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by seekermeister View Post
Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't volts and heat tied together? Yes, I know that a processor can be overheated by poor cooling, even at normal voltage, but if properly cooled, the reason for overheating is voltage adjustment, they are the flip-side of the same coin. Evidence of overheating is obvious even to an amateur, if they know what to look for...a darkening of the PCB on the bottom. I doubt that neither AMD or Intel have crystal balls that permit them a more definitive diagnosis without dismantling a processor, and I doubt that they ever do that for an RMA inspection.
Again, it's not heat, per se, that kills a cpu.

Heat is a function of voltage and clock speed. Yes, you can increase temps by increasing voltage, but you can also increase temps by increasing clock speed without touching voltage.

Cpu's shut themselves off when they reach a certain temperature, so it's really very rare to see a cpu that was killed by heat. For all sorts of reasons you want your cpu to run as cool as possible, but heat alone won't kill a cpu.

One cannot tie heat and voltage together here. Yes, they're related, but really, it's all about the volts. If you were to look at a years worth of dead cpus, I'll bet my left arm only a small fraction of them would be the blackened scarred type you see on youtube... complete with the firemarshall in the background. Fact of the matter is most times the only way you can "see" that a cpu is dead is indirectly; because the machine won't turn on.
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08 Jun 2011   #19
seekermeister

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

Okay, if a processor has been killed by either volts or clock speed, without causing overheating, how would the manufacturers know that upon inspection?
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08 Jun 2011   #20
Fumz

7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Clock speed alone won't kill a cpu. Clock speed would only generate heat; enough heat and the cpu would either throttle down or shut itself off.

There are some pretty sharp cookies over at Intel. I have no idea what they do, but if they wanted to know what killed a cpu, my guess is they would find out.

lol, you gotta drop the notion that heat is a culprit.
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