Official Seven Forums Overclock Leader boards [2]

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  1. Posts : 599
    Windows 7 Ultimate x64
       #811

    Solarstarshines said:
    Gees i wonder should i try and do something nah i am good on to new things

    Jeepman and Ralph enjoy being on top of the mountain someone has to be brave enough to take that fall from the top
    I take the fall, I have the intel rig ready, and I will order it the very same day. Why do you think my settings were as followinhg in bios to achieve 5.4 (of course cpuz and other programs does not report the max I set but I will share, maybe someone can use it.

    Cpu Multiplier - 18
    FSB-272
    Cpu Manual Voltage - 2.0 V
    Cpu/NB - 1.25 V
    Cpu VDDA - 2.8 V
    Dram Voltage - 2.0 V
    NB Voltage - 2.0 V
    NB HT Voltage - 1.5 V

    LLC cpu / nb - Extreme
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 599
    Windows 7 Ultimate x64
       #812

    A Guy said:
    Wow, those are great numbers guys! Who sweats more, you or the chips? :)

    A Guy
    My cpu never broke 45 C on that overclock. I am planning a 5.6 /5.7 run, but my issues, ram settings / drive strengths (yes I have to set those manually) And thanks to the medication ( not that it can be a good thing sometimes, I have a *so what* attitude lately when it comes to items I own* I think it is a side effect since my medications effect the same Gaba -a/b agonist and a GHB modulator.
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 7,470
    Windows 10 Home Premium 64bit sp1
       #813

    The settings are great but 2.0 voltage (Hell has frozen over) comes to mind
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 3,118
    Win7 Home Premium x64 SP1
       #814

    Solarstarshines said:
    The settings are great but 2.0 voltage (Hell has frozen over) comes to mind
    Plus with Extreme llc the voltage will be going over what is set in the bios
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 7,470
    Windows 10 Home Premium 64bit sp1
       #815

    ganjiry said:
    Solarstarshines said:
    The settings are great but 2.0 voltage (Hell has frozen over) comes to mind
    Plus with Extreme llc the voltage will be going over what is set in the bios
    Man Ralph those VRM heatsinks you made need to be Patent Buddy you have something special on your hands
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 599
    Windows 7 Ultimate x64
       #816

    Solarstarshines said:
    ganjiry said:
    Solarstarshines said:
    The settings are great but 2.0 voltage (Hell has frozen over) comes to mind
    Plus with Extreme llc the voltage will be going over what is set in the bios
    Man Ralph those VRM heatsinks you made need to be Patent Buddy you have something special on your hands
    I am actually in contact with family counsel about this, it turns out VRM cooling via fan IS patented, but not the way I made it, so I will see about this issue further, In case you're wondering, my VRM1 and VRM2 temps never broke 48 C during this run. I have 5 thermocouples and a pretty descent voltmeter and I was checking temps I had labelled prior on VRM1,2, NB, SB and back of motherboard behind the CPU ( I prepared meticulously for this run, as I will prepare for my 4.6 trials this week, I came up with an idea involving using a large can of upside down can of compressed air. If you have ever turned them upside down, they squirt out a very cold liquid, I am preparing the tubing in a manner that will use the cold vapors from this too cool my cpu backplate since right now it's the only place I can think off that a little condensation can be had for under 10 minutes, just enough to turn on PC, turn on PC, run OCCT for 5 minutes to test stability and validate and GET THE H out of there, I am a DYI inventor after all. Everything was under 50. Also check out my new thread, it may interest you too. By the way, I estimate the cost of the makeshift compressed air cooling device to be under 50 dollars. Perhaps another patent, what do you think? For those too strapped with cash to go LN2 ?
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 24,479
    Windows 7 Ultimate X64 SP1
       #817

    that may work with the compressed air Ralph. I think it would be wise to have some sort of way to collect the liquid and hold it against the back plate.
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 599
    Windows 7 Ultimate x64
       #818

    Britton30 said:
    that may work with the compressed air Ralph. I think it would be wise to have some sort of way to collect the liquid and hold it against the back plate.
    I was thinking something simple like this, sure it could be expensive for compressed air, but what about another cold liquid that turns into a gas?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Official Seven Forums Overclock Leader boards [2]-untitled1.jpg  
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  9. Posts : 599
    Windows 7 Ultimate x64
       #819

    To collect / keep cold liquid a small dewer might do that trick, could even close it with pressure release control valve so it does not evaporate away. I guess back of the board *ln2* extra cooling, might just work?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Official Seven Forums Overclock Leader boards [2]-170px-dewargefaess_deutsches_museum.jpg  
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  10. Posts : 599
    Windows 7 Ultimate x64
       #820

    Condensing volatile gases for reaction - Chemwiki

    Quoting a website relevant to the idea :
    Assuming the volatile gas is coming from a lecture bottle, there are a few ways to do this:
    Bubbling into solvent: Add solvent into a reaction flask (with stirbar?) and pre-weigh. Bubble gas into stirring solvent (cooled?), stop when the weight matches the desired amount. I've been concerned about suckback into lecture bottles (although I suspect I'm very paranoid, so there are other ways to skin this cat.)
    Just doing it: From the brass adapter (that you can buy special from Aldrich!) that's screwed onto the lecture bottle fitting, attach a tube and direct it into a pre-chilled tared round-bottom flask. When you think you're done adding, turn down the gas and quickly weigh the flask.
    Using a coldfinger

    The methods above work fine, but you run the risk of allowing a lot of evaporation of your gas to happen. So, when you move to a higher scale (>20 grams of condensed liquid), you might want to try a coldtrap. Assuming that you have one (see 1st picture below), it's pretty self-explanatory: just a glass coldfinger with a place for dry ice/acetone to cool down the incoming gas, a gas inlet above and a 24/40 ground glass joint at the bottom.
    You prepare your lecture bottle pretty mundanely (2nd picture): screw your brass fitting onto the inlet and attach whatever tubing that you prefer. I like stiff plastic tubing, but that's just an affectation more than anything. Obviously, 1/4 inch Tygon is best for good seals between tubing and fittings. If you have something that's particularly dangerous (it is, after all, a pressurized gas), you should probably clamp that thing down. While it's not pictured below, it's probably still a good diea.

    1. Take your coldfinger and mate it to the multi-neck round bottom of your choice. You'll note that below (3rd picture), the picture shows a three-neck flask with two septa and a needle for venting. It has been pre-weighed (with the septa and needle). Clamp the RBF and the coldfinger.
    2. Hook your Tygon tubing from the lecture bottle to your coldfinger.
    3. Cool the coldfinger to the desired temperature; in this case, -78C.
    4. Slowly add the gas by opening the knob on the pre-weighed lecture bottle (slowly!) You will note that the bubbling of the coldfinger will get faster as the gas is condensing to liquid. Hopefully, the liquid is collecting on the coldfinger and you're seeing it drip into your reaction flask. Add as much as you need. You can check your progress by 1) looking 2) checking the weight of the lecture bottle or 3) checking the weight of your reaction flask (tedious). Stop when you think you're done by tightening the knob on the lecture bottle.
    5. You can add reaction solvent slowly by either adding it by squeeze bottle through the top inlet of the coldfinger or (for larger amounts) performing a cold cannulation. If you're experiencing clogging of the cannula (due to water (?) freezing at the tip of the cannula), you can place it deep enough into your reaction flask that it gets jarred by the stirbar.

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Official Seven Forums Overclock Leader boards [2]-dryice-c.jpg  
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