Windows 7 Forums

Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: Lubricating a stock intel fan

22 Apr 2017   #1
magmag

Windows 7 Ultimate X64
 
 
Lubricating a stock intel fan

Sorry for my question about a kinda outdated cpu. I'm still running an old Intel Core i5 750 (Lynnfield) with stock parameters and stock heat sink. Everything is fine except that the fan is kinda heavy (it stops rotating immediately after I spin it) so I thought of lubricating it with few oil droplets (I got this oil with my hair cut machine). I tried removing the sticker - as shown in attached pic - but I found that there's no rubber to lift or something and lubricate under it (as I've seen on some youtube videos).

Is it the other side of the fan that has the stuff which needs lubricating? if so, that needs me to detach the fan from the heatsink in the first place. Is this possible or both are one unit?

In case of no possibility to do anything with this fan, I'm thinking about ordering from outside my country ARCTIC Freezer i11 CPU Cooler which looks huge as I've seen on youtube so I'm not really sure if buying this thing will work inside my Gigabyte Setto case and Gigabyte P55A-UD3P board.

Will appreciate your sincerer advice...





Attached Thumbnails
Lubricating a stock intel fan-img_20170422_212909-002-.jpg  
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
22 Apr 2017   #2
Rg97

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

You'd not want to lubricate the fan, It will act in the way you describe because the fan is rotated by a DC Motor, so resistance is normal and is good for functionality. If there was little or no resistance I'd recommend a new fan, rather than a repair on existing fan.

Honestly however I would say get the new cooler as stock fans are usually cheap and do a mediocre job anyways.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Apr 2017   #3
johnhoh

Win7 pro x64
 
 

the fan is not meant to be lubricated. If you input your motherboard and case into pcpartpicker.com, the site is pretty good at showing you only compatible coolers. But your best bet is to get another stock i5 750 cooler and just put its fan onto your existing heatsink, that way you don't have to uninstall your heatsink. Though I'm not really sure you can easily separate the fan from the heatsink - you'd need to check on that.

https://www.amazon.com/Intel-Cooler-.../dp/B00BQ1C4SS
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

23 Apr 2017   #4
Ranger4

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit sp1
 
 

magmag. The fan will stop almost immediately if you spin it by hand, as it uses permanent magnets inside to reduce heat & power usage.

The main reason for replacing a fan that still works is if it's very noisy, which indicates a dry bearing & generally speaking it cannot be successfully lubricated.

If your fan runs normally & is quiet, leave it alone.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
24 Apr 2017   #5
magmag

Windows 7 Ultimate X64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Ranger4 View Post
magmag. The fan will stop almost immediately if you spin it by hand, as it uses permanent magnets inside to reduce heat & power usage.

The main reason for replacing a fan that still works is if it's very noisy, which indicates a dry bearing & generally speaking it cannot be successfully lubricated.

If your fan runs normally & is quiet, leave it alone.
It's quite in normal days but on hot days, the fan is mostly changing between high and low speed rotation & it becomes noisy.

For the rotation of the fan, back in the days, when I blow dust from the fan, it used to rotate for a while after I stop the blower. Now the fan stops kinda immediately after finishing blowing air so I feel it has a dry bearing. I'm assuming that the oil has dried since I assembled my machine from mid 2010 (but it's not running for 24/7).
My System SpecsSystem Spec
24 Apr 2017   #6
RoasterMen

Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
 
 

The Processor Fan will rev up if the CPU thinks the Processor gets hotter than normal. I'd rather buy new fan than lubricate it because you will destroy that fan.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
24 Apr 2017   #7
iko22

Windows 7 x64, Vista x64, 8.1 smartphone
 
 

I tried as you said, blowing the fan, to see where any difference could be.

I have a spare Foxconn Intel cpu fan that hasnt been used for nearly the past three years. So I tried blowing air over the blades to see where it would get me.

I must say that firstly I gave my puff a short throaty huff kind of blow - as you would to blow dust - and the fan blades rolled over only a few ticks then halted abruptly and swayed side to side momentarily before reaching a complete stand still.

After repeated efforts to get the thing to rotate on its own for a while, I then decided to blow a chesty lung of air, and it did indeed rotate at speed for a good 2 - 3 seconds, before the blades abruptly halted and swayed side to side as the fan came to a halt; you have to blow at the right place, like over the fan blades to the right side or to the left side, because otherwise, if you blow in the centre, then the fan doesnt move much and its rotational mechanism looks quite stiff also.

So my conclusion is that you are right, the fan blades on a cpu do rotate for a while if you put enough 'puff into your huff' (?), AND blow air across the blades from above in the right place, because if you blow merely 2 cm away from the right place, then the mechanism is full of inertia and abrupt in motion again.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 Lubricating a stock intel fan




Thread Tools




Similar help and support threads
Thread Forum
How to Replace Stock CPU Fan
Hi, I am building a PC and I would like to upgrade my CPU fan from the stock one. I want to keep the stock heatsink to save some money if possible. My idea is that I can remove the fan from the stock cpu heatsink, and then replace it with a CoolerMaster Sickleflow or Rosewill fan. The processor...
PC Custom Builds and Overclocking
Seidon 120V vs Intel stock cooler test
I currently run 6 * i7s in my little render farm, and when upgrading one machine to 4770K recently I decided to try a single rad Coolermaster Seidon 120V instead of the stock Intel cooler just as an experiment. Since I already had another 4770K (same mobo, ram etc) in my setup I was able to do a...
PC Custom Builds and Overclocking
Should I update my stock Dell Drivers to Intel Drivers.
My Dell XPS L502x is 14 months old (i7, 8GB, 689GB HDD, HM77, Nvidia 540M GT). I have installed all latest drivers for my laptop from Dell website. But those are still more than 6 months old. When I use Intel Driver update utility, it shows new version of drivers available. Even my nvidia control...
Drivers
Overclocking Intel Q6600 with a stock cooler
First I want to tell that i only know a few basics about overclocking in BIOS..and if someone has some OC experience with q6600 I really would love to if that person could help me overclock..or pm me..sorry for bad language
PC Custom Builds and Overclocking
Intel i7-860 stock CPU cooling fan
Building a new computer. Went to the store (micro center) to pick up a i7-860 CPU. On the recommendation of the guy helping me build the system, I was going to get a "aftermarket" CPU cooling fan, but they were sold out so I could not get it. The sales guy said I didn't need it anyways and...
Hardware & Devices


Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:24.
Twitter Facebook Google+ Seven Forums iOS App Seven Forums Android App