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Windows 7: o/c windows 7

28 Mar 2010   #21
jasin

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

Something like a zalman 9500 or a zalman cnps10x with some artic silver 5 would be much better.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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28 Mar 2010   #22
jasin

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

The Noctua NH-D14 would be a very good choice too.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Mar 2010   #23
fastslvblkcar

windows 7 premium x64
 
 

what do you mean not a good setup? areyou just talking about the heatsink?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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30 Mar 2010   #24
Mellon Head

Win 7 Pro x64/Win 10 Pro x64 dual boot
 
 

I think what's being said here is that your not exactly o/cing in the best way. Overclocking is an experimental process that can be difficult and time consuming to do properly. It also has to be done carefully.

Your 965 is made to o/c, for sure, but you have to do it smart, or you'll just wreck your hardware prematurely. Here are a few simple tips that I've picked up from overclocking my rig:

1. Buy the best cooler you can afford. Never use a stock HS, except for mild overclocks.
2. Use good thermal paste, like Arctic Silver 5, on your cooler.
3. Increase the Vcore and Northbridge voltages to the MINIMUM amount needed for your overclock to be stable.
4. Use a decent temp monitoring program like CoreTemp or Speedfan to monitor those temps.
5. Be realistic in your expectations. A 20% overclock is quite respectable for us normal humans. If you wanna go crazy with that 965 and get to 4.5 or something, then yes, you will need water cooling or something more drastic.

It sounds by your comments and questions, that you are new to o/cing, or don't really understand it all that well. I don't mean to be rude, and I'm not trying to criticize, but you really should do a lot of research before o/cing. Just because it's a BE chip doesn't mean you can just crank it up and go zoom without being careful. If you read the fine print, even AMD says not to o/c their BE chips.

It's like anything else. If you really aren't sure, then find out and make sure before you do it, so you don't do it wrong. Phenoms are expensive.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Mar 2010   #25
mpcrsc562

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Mellon Head View Post
I think what's being said here is that your not exactly o/cing in the best way. Overclocking is an experimental process that can be difficult and time consuming to do properly. It also has to be done carefully.

Your 965 is made to o/c, for sure, but you have to do it smart, or you'll just wreck your hardware prematurely. Here are a few simple tips that I've picked up from overclocking my rig:

1. Buy the best cooler you can afford. Never use a stock HS, except for mild overclocks.
2. Use good thermal paste, like Arctic Silver 5, on your cooler.
3. Increase the Vcore and Northbridge voltages to the MINIMUM amount needed for your overclock to be stable.
4. Use a decent temp monitoring program like CoreTemp or Speedfan to monitor those temps.
5. Be realistic in your expectations. A 20% overclock is quite respectable for us normal humans. If you wanna go crazy with that 965 and get to 4.5 or something, then yes, you will need water cooling or something more drastic.

It sounds by your comments and questions, that you are new to o/cing, or don't really understand it all that well. I don't mean to be rude, and I'm not trying to criticize, but you really should do a lot of research before o/cing. Just because it's a BE chip doesn't mean you can just crank it up and go zoom without being careful. If you read the fine print, even AMD says not to o/c their BE chips.

It's like anything else. If you really aren't sure, then find out and make sure before you do it, so you don't do it wrong. Phenoms are expensive.
These are very good comments from Mellon Head (and from everyone else too)!
I'd like to add something: I have a Black Edition processor too. It looks good on the specs to see that your processor is at 4.5GHz or something, but realistically, when I overclocked my processor, whatever frequency I could get it to run stable without cranking up the voltage, that was good enough for me. So, my overclocks on this processor have always been at 3.3 to 3.4GHz. I've read many stories of people pushing this chip to frequencies higher than that on stock voltage, but every motherboard, every processor, every other piece of hardware in your system will get different results from the next person. The overall thing that everyone has stated within this thread, is you need to rid the processor of heat in the quickest, most efficient manner if you are going to overclock.

There are other variances to consider as well: where is your PC located? How hot does the room get in the summer? How good is your ram--not only do you risk frying components if you crank up voltages, but if your ram ain't up to snuff, you'll start to get corruption error messages.

Probably more, but a lot to think about.

Lastly, a comment and my opinion: I don't overclock mine anymore. Why? Three giga-hertz serves me well. Overclocking, basically, is to get more performance from a chip that may not be all that great at its stock config. Yours is a stock 3.4 GHz--that's plenty fast for pretty much any and all applications you can throw at it. You already have a Corvette... If you want something grander than that, get a Core i7 Extreme--just my opinion.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Mar 2010   #26
fastslvblkcar

windows 7 premium x64
 
 

thanks for thehelp guys really appreciate it i now have a new cooler on the way and when payday rolls around a new video card i bought the CNPS10X QUIET it got some pretty good review on cooling and noise. haven't decided for sure on which video card. i also have some ddr2 1066 on the way. thanks for the help again!
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Mar 2010   #27
mpcrsc562

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by fastslvblkcar View Post
thanks for thehelp guys really appreciate it i now have a new cooler on the way and when payday rolls around a new video card i bought the CNPS10X QUIET it got some pretty good review on cooling and noise. haven't decided for sure on which video card. i also have some ddr2 1066 on the way. thanks for the help again!
Looking at your edit, your stock speed would serve you well for you video encoding/recoding. You can take advantage of GPU accelerated encoding/recoding with ATI or nVidia.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Mar 2010   #28
fastslvblkcar

windows 7 premium x64
 
 

looks like ati is probably the way to go
My System SpecsSystem Spec
31 Mar 2010   #29
CommonTater

XP Pro SP3 X86 / Win7 Pro X86
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by fastslvblkcar View Post
what do you mean not a good setup? areyou just talking about the heatsink?
I'd say it's a pretty good setup, based on your specs.

But it's not a very good setup for overclocking. As I mentioned before there are demons to tackle, heat being the worst. A stock cooler is intended to operate the CPU correctly within published specs which is where joe average is going to run his computer. Overclocking is an entirely different story.

As has been pointed out, it may be fun to play with but in the real world it really doesn't amount to a big hill of beans difference in anything... Your hard disk (the biggest bottleneck in most systems) isn't going to go any faster and neither is your network connection (the second biggest bottleneck) so any gains you make are going to be modest at best.

For all practical uses any CPU over 1.5ghz is fast enough for the average user. Increases in speed less than 1.5:1 (eg 3ghz vs 2gh) usually go unnoticed, except on benchmarks and stress tests, which have very little to do with real world computing.

Believe me a minor increase in your WEI number is, for most purposes quite meaningless.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
31 Mar 2010   #30
mpcrsc562

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by fastslvblkcar View Post
looks like ati is probably the way to go
That's personal preference--read up.
[Not wanting this thread to go somewhere it's not supposed to, cause I can do it real quick ] ... But that is nVidia's big push for their Fermi architecture: GPGPU. In other words, applications that use the GPU for computing. So, ATI has Avivo Video Converter and I don't know by name the product(s) nVidia is promoting with their technology. But to sum it all up: Your CPU is fast enough to handle anything you can throw at it. And for your interest in video encoding/recoding, you'd be better served with a graphics card and an application that can accelerate the video encoding/recoding--in my opinion, that is.
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 o/c windows 7




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