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Windows 7: Dangers of Overclocking?

13 Jun 2010   #1
smartman

Windows 7 Home Premium 64x
 
 
Dangers of Overclocking?

Hi, I was wondering what some of the dangers were of overclocking? I have a laptop, and I know overclocking would produce a lot of heat... = laptop overheating...

Would overclocking a Acer Aspire 5520 laptop, with AMD Athlon 64 x2 Dual Core Processor, be worth it?

Would it be worth it if I bought one of those cooling stations?

Thanks, Smart (or not so smart) man


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
13 Jun 2010   #2
Lomai

Win7 HP (x64)/Win7 Ultimate (x64)
 
 

Hi

Some of the experts on this forum will provide some feedback on whether you can overclock your laptop.
As a starter - have a look at this thread

Regards
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Jun 2010   #3
zigzag3143

Win 8 Release candidate 8400
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by smartman View Post
Hi, I was wondering what some of the dangers were of overclocking? I have a laptop, and I know overclocking would produce a lot of heat... = laptop overheating...

Would overclocking a Acer Aspire 5520 laptop, with AMD Athlon 64 x2 Dual Core Processor, be worth it?

Would it be worth it if I bought one of those cooling stations?

Thanks, Smart (or not so smart) man

Laptops are not ideal candidates for overclocking. There have been far too many melted and ruined laptops from the heat. DONT

Then there is the shortened life span, and the instability. again DONT


Ken
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

13 Jun 2010   #4
Wishmaster

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

Chances are the bios are locked.
The only way around that is with software COing and I would highly advise against it.

The bios are locked for a reason, being its not designed for the additional stress or heat.
Being a laptop its even more so of an issue.


If looki g to increase performance, have you thought about upgrading to a SSD drive?
Likely will improve perf. far more than OCing the CPU a little bit w/out any risk.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Jun 2010   #5
A Guy

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium x64 SP1
 
 

Have to agree with Ken and Wishmaster. Laptops are bad candidates for overclocking, and software overclocking is generally a bad idea. I know "everyone is doing it", but prepare for it if you want to do it...on your next PC

A Guy
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Jun 2010   #6
Product FRED

Windows 7 Enterprise 64-bit
 
 

Basically, overheating is the only issue. And I'm not downplaying it when I say "only issue".
My System SpecsSystem Spec
14 Jun 2010   #7
Lordbob75

Windows 7 Ultimate x64, Mint 9
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Product FRED View Post
Basically, overheating is the only issue. And I'm not downplaying it when I say "only issue".
Uh...

What about system stability? Chip life and performance? OCing affects all of these, and not positively.

When you overclock, you run the FSB and/or clock multiplier at a higher rating. (so 333MHz FSB and 9x Clock for 3GHz to a 400MHz and 10x clocck for 4GHz). You can also (have to sometimes) raise the voltage put into the CPU (1.2V standard up to around 1.5V I think).

This increased work generates more heat. The more work, the more heat. At a certain point, a few things can happen:
1. System Failure. Your computer will crash (BSoD) because the CPU cannot handle the settings you have put it up to, and the motherboard shuts it down to prevent serious hardware damage
2. Overheating. If your system is stable, OCing will produce more heat regardless. This WILL shorten the lifespan of your hardware, and (especially in a laptop) cause the rest of your system to heat up (thus decreasing their life)
3. Total Catastrophic Failure. This is not an official name, but it sounded cool. This is also really really hard to do. This is where your CPU basically melts by going WAY outside of its safe ranges. And no, it's not a joke. You can LITERALLY melt your CPU. While this will probably never happen (other things would break WAY before this), it is the ultimate failure.

Now, OCing can (ironically), in some cases, cause lowered performance and glitching. This may or may not be noticable, but had been known to happen (read the gaming/graphics cards forum). Certain programs may not work properly on an OCed system, or it may cause problems with the OS itself.
Because every part (even the same one) is different, there are different OC ranges per part and different reactions. Some can even be backwards and perform worse at non-stock settings.

In the end, OCing a laptop is just stupid (decreased battery life and heat being major factors).
Desktops are ideal, but you still need to know what you are doing.

Hope this helps.

~Lordbob
My System SpecsSystem Spec
14 Jun 2010   #8
Fumz

7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by smartman View Post
Hi, I was wondering what some of the dangers were of overclocking? I have a laptop, and I know overclocking would produce a lot of heat... = laptop overheating...

Would overclocking a Acer Aspire 5520 laptop, with AMD Athlon 64 x2 Dual Core Processor, be worth it?

Would it be worth it if I bought one of those cooling stations?

Thanks, Smart (or not so smart) man

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Lordbob75 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Product FRED View Post
Basically, overheating is the only issue. And I'm not downplaying it when I say "only issue".
Uh...

What about system stability? Chip life and performance? OCing affects all of these, and not positively.

When you overclock, you run the FSB and/or clock multiplier at a higher rating. (so 333MHz FSB and 9x Clock for 3GHz to a 400MHz and 10x clocck for 4GHz). You can also (have to sometimes) raise the voltage put into the CPU (1.2V standard up to around 1.5V I think).

This increased work generates more heat. The more work, the more heat. At a certain point, a few things can happen:
1. System Failure. Your computer will crash (BSoD) because the CPU cannot handle the settings you have put it up to, and the motherboard shuts it down to prevent serious hardware damage
2. Overheating. If your system is stable, OCing will produce more heat regardless. This WILL shorten the lifespan of your hardware, and (especially in a laptop) cause the rest of your system to heat up (thus decreasing their life)
3. Total Catastrophic Failure. This is not an official name, but it sounded cool. This is also really really hard to do. This is where your CPU basically melts by going WAY outside of its safe ranges. And no, it's not a joke. You can LITERALLY melt your CPU. While this will probably never happen (other things would break WAY before this), it is the ultimate failure.

Now, OCing can (ironically), in some cases, cause lowered performance and glitching. This may or may not be noticable, but had been known to happen (read the gaming/graphics cards forum). Certain programs may not work properly on an OCed system, or it may cause problems with the OS itself.
Because every part (even the same one) is different, there are different OC ranges per part and different reactions. Some can even be backwards and perform worse at non-stock settings.

In the end, OCing a laptop is just stupid (decreased battery life and heat being major factors).
Desktops are ideal, but you still need to know what you are doing.

Hope this helps.

~Lordbob
Please heed Lordbob's sage advice here. The gains are too small and the risks too large to even consider overclocking a laptop; there simply isn't enough space to dissipate the heat you will generate.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
14 Jun 2010   #9
Dave76

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Ult x64 - SP1/ Windows 8 Pro x64
 
 

As Wishmaster said your BIOS is likely locked, and as Lordbob75 mentioned it's really not a good idea for a laptop.

+1 for Wishmaster's suggestion to get a SSD. You will see noticeable performance improvement and the prices have been coming down, that will be your best bet.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
14 Jun 2010   #10
Product FRED

Windows 7 Enterprise 64-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Lordbob75 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Product FRED View Post
Basically, overheating is the only issue. And I'm not downplaying it when I say "only issue".
Uh...

What about system stability? Chip life and performance? OCing affects all of these, and not positively.

When you overclock, you run the FSB and/or clock multiplier at a higher rating. (so 333MHz FSB and 9x Clock for 3GHz to a 400MHz and 10x clocck for 4GHz). You can also (have to sometimes) raise the voltage put into the CPU (1.2V standard up to around 1.5V I think).

This increased work generates more heat. The more work, the more heat. At a certain point, a few things can happen:
1. System Failure. Your computer will crash (BSoD) because the CPU cannot handle the settings you have put it up to, and the motherboard shuts it down to prevent serious hardware damage
2. Overheating. If your system is stable, OCing will produce more heat regardless. This WILL shorten the lifespan of your hardware, and (especially in a laptop) cause the rest of your system to heat up (thus decreasing their life)
3. Total Catastrophic Failure. This is not an official name, but it sounded cool. This is also really really hard to do. This is where your CPU basically melts by going WAY outside of its safe ranges. And no, it's not a joke. You can LITERALLY melt your CPU. While this will probably never happen (other things would break WAY before this), it is the ultimate failure.

Now, OCing can (ironically), in some cases, cause lowered performance and glitching. This may or may not be noticable, but had been known to happen (read the gaming/graphics cards forum). Certain programs may not work properly on an OCed system, or it may cause problems with the OS itself.
Because every part (even the same one) is different, there are different OC ranges per part and different reactions. Some can even be backwards and perform worse at non-stock settings.

In the end, OCing a laptop is just stupid (decreased battery life and heat being major factors).
Desktops are ideal, but you still need to know what you are doing.

Hope this helps.

~Lordbob
I'm aware. I was summarizing. Hence I said not trying to
downplay it.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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