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Windows 7: How to copy files between two hard drives faster?

03 Sep 2010   #21
cluberti

Windows 10 Pro x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by unifex View Post
I'd like to add, that these problem seem to be confined to internal disks, strangely enough. I have an external hard drive connected via eSATA, and transfer rates to and from this device are way higher that between internal disks. This does not make sense at all. We are talking about same internal disks - with or without their formatting problems, but why would a transfer rate from the external drive be higher then between different partitions on the same internal drive?
Because the transfer between partitions is hitting the same physical hardware for each read and write, whereas copying to a different physical disk is just that - aka, less overhead on the disk I/O controller (which may not be the greatest firmware to begin with, especially with random reads while writing and random writes while reading, where most bad firmware falls down).


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04 Sep 2010   #22
Maxxwire

Windows 7 x64 Home Premium
 
 

My computer used to also suffer from low 2 digit transfer rates the highest of which was 38.3 MBps over 400 Firewire. That was until I hooked up a LaCie 2TB eSATA Raid 0 drive and now file transfers go more than 10X as fast...






~Maxx~
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My System SpecsSystem Spec
05 Sep 2010   #23
pparks1

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

I hate to burst your bubble maxxwire, but there is no way that your internal Hitachi disk drive can read fast enough to supply data to that Lacie drive at 430MB/s. If you were actually copying that fast, your 3GB file copy would have been done in about 6 seconds.

@The original poster....20MB/s seems pretty slow between 2 physical drives. But with some drive fragmentation and such...and a drive that only gets around 60MB/s anyway...if you have lots of little files.....20MB/s might be right

For those interested in robocopy, the syntax is easy
robocopy C:\sourceFolder X:\destinationFolder /mir /dst

The /mir means to mirror everything...even deletions. So, when you delete from C:\sourceFolder, it would also remove the file from X:\destinationFolder.
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05 Sep 2010   #24
Maxxwire

Windows 7 x64 Home Premium
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by pparks1 View Post
I hate to burst your bubble maxxwire, but there is no way that your internal Hitachi disk drive can read fast enough to supply data to that Lacie drive at 430MB/s.
Yes you are correct, but you're not bursting my bubble because I made no claim that it was the HDD that was making the file transfer go at 430 MBps because I have discovered that it is something quite different and much much faster than spinning discs that develops this kind speed. Having shown you a straight up honest unaltered screenshot of the speed Win 7 is saying it transferred those music files at now let me share with you what I discovered about how the amazing Win 7 OS architecture accomplishes incredibly high speed file transfers such as this.

During these high speed transfers Win 7 employs over 1 GB of 1333 Mhz DDR3 RAM which as we all know is much faster than any HDD. Here is a second music file transfer as well as a Win 7 video file transfer to further demonstrate how fast this 1+ GB of DDR 3 RAM works...





.........Before............During Transfer.............After..........

As you can see by the screenshots above that I took before, during and after a high speed file transfer there's only a total of 3% of the Core i7 930 CPU being used with only one of the 8 logical cores making even a modest 12% effort which leaves Win 7 speeding the file transfer along by cleverly implementing 1.04 GB of 1.333 GHz DDR 3 RAM. In other words Win 7 employs enough RAM to run several XP computers in order to be able to transfer files at these high speeds.

As far as the Mobo goes the specs on the Intel ICH10 Southbridge benchmark it at 650 MBps which is more than fast enough for these transfer speeds which Win 7 has recorded time and time again...



~Maxx~
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My System SpecsSystem Spec
05 Sep 2010   #25
pparks1

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Maxxwire View Post
Having shown you a straight up honest unaltered screenshot of the speed Win 7 is saying it transferred those music files at
I realize that you didn't alter the screenshot, but the Windows file transfer speed being displayed is known at times to be inaccurate or showing cached values instead.

Let me ask...when you copied the 1.5GB of music...did the copy complete in less than 4 seconds?

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Maxxwire View Post
During these high speed transfers Win 7 employs over 1 GB of 1333 Mhz DDR3 RAM which as we all know is much faster than any HDD.
Yes, RAM is much faster than the hard drive. However, unless you are actually storing these music files somehow in your RAM...they would have to be accessed via your hard drive first to get them into RAM. And you are limited by the physical speed of your hard drive making that 1st process happen.


Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Maxxwire View Post
As you can see by the screenshots above that I took before, during and after a high speed file transfer there's only a total of 3% of the Core i7 930 CPU being used with only one of the 8 logical cores making even a modest 12% effort which leaves Win 7 speeding the file transfer along by cleverly implementing 1.04 GB of 1.333 GHz DDR 3 RAM.
I'm not following this logic at all. A file copy procedure is not CPU intensive in any way at all....never has been.

So, are these 1.5GB file copies finishing in 3-4 seconds? That's all I really want to know.
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05 Sep 2010   #26
Maxxwire

Windows 7 x64 Home Premium
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by pparks1 View Post
Let me ask...when you copied the 1.5GB of music...did the copy complete in less than 4 seconds?

Yes, RAM is much faster than the hard drive. However, unless you are actually storing these music files somehow in your RAM...they would have to be accessed via your hard drive first to get them into RAM. And you are limited by the physical speed of your hard drive making that 1st process happen.

A file copy procedure is not CPU intensive in any way at all....never has been.

So, are these 1.5GB file copies finishing in 3-4 seconds? That's all I really want to know.
When I first saw these Win 7 file transfer benchmarks and wondered how they could be so fast I remembered an article I had read by Mark Russinovich, Technical Fellow in the Platform and Services Division at Microsoft, and previously of Winternals and Sysinternals.com. in which he explained that people who compared the file copy speed of XP to that of Vista using a stopwatch and supposing XP to be much faster than Vista because they stopped timing when the dialog box in disappeared were getting inaccurate results because XP was not faster, but rather when the dialog box dissapeared XP just committed the remaining files to RAM to finish the file transfer.



Here Mark Russinovich describes the inner complexities of Windows file transfer...

"Copying a file seems like a relatively straightforward operation: open the source file, create the destination, and then read from the source and write to the destination. In reality, however, the performance of copying files is measured along the dimensions of accurate progress indication, CPU usage, memory usage, and throughput".

This puts your over simplified assumptions about how file copying works into proper prespective and reveals Mark Russinovich's knowledge that RAM does play a part in Windows OS file transfer which is quite accurately and adequately shown in the screenshot which clearly shows 1.04 GB of RAM (which is just slightly less than the total amount of RAM that the entire OS is using) being used on a temporary basis in order to accomplish the Win 7 file transfers just as it was designed to and here's the documented proof of the truth that just as Mark Russinovich pointed out file transfer involves both CPU usage and RAM usage...



I'm sure that you are aware that any value shown in the dialog box during a file transfer is representative of the speed at the moment it was taken. Most of these file transfer screenshots were taken about 1/2 way through simply because that is as fast as I could possibly move the mouse to operate the fscapture tool. As far as the total elapsed time of the Win 7 file transfers goes as you know the dialog box does not give this information and I apologize but the file transfers had completely finished long before I was able to store the screen captures in an effort to prove how amazingly fast the file transfers were going thus creating an unfortunate Catch 22 situation.

~Maxx~
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My System SpecsSystem Spec
05 Sep 2010   #27
pparks1

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Maxxwire View Post
When I first saw these Win 7 file transfer benchmarks and wondered how they could be so fast I remembered an article I had read by Mark Russinovich, Technical Fellow in the Platform and Services Division at Microsoft, and previously of Winternals and Sysinternals.com. in which he explained that people who compared the file copy speed of XP to that of Vista using a stopwatch and supposing XP to be much faster than Vista because they stopped timing when the dialog box in disappeared were getting inaccurate results because XP was not faster, but rather when the dialog box dissapeared XP just committed the remaining files to RAM to finish the file transfer.
The point of that discussion was that people thought that the file copies in XP were much faster because the dialog box disappeared faster. However, that wasn't the end of the file transfer at all within XP. So, people were disappointed with Vista, especially with network file transfers because it seemed like they took MUCH longer...not that they were faster. Microsoft made strides to ensure that the dialog boxes reflected more accurately true performance and thus they stay up on the screen for a longer period of time.
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Maxxwire View Post
Thanks, you posted a picture. I'm assuming that you meant to attach a youtube video or something that I could watch ?

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Maxxwire View Post
This puts your over simplified assumptions about how file copying works into proper prespective
I said that file copying was NOT CPU intensive...and it's not. Sure, it uses the CPU...but you aren't going to see a huge spike in task manager when you simply copy a file from one location to another.


Don't worry about screenshots, just time the overall file copy operation. If you copy 3GB of data from your C drive to your LACIE drive and the file copy is done in under 7 seconds...then I will concede that you are getting over 400MB/s. I'd be willing to bet the file copy takes closer to 35 seconds however putting you legitimately around 85MB/s
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05 Sep 2010   #28
Maxxwire

Windows 7 x64 Home Premium
 
 

You are severely underestimating the considerable load that it takes to require the Intel Core i7 930 to work at 3% during a file transfer which means you have yet to prove Mark Russinovich and myself wrong that file transfers are not both CPU and RAM intensive in light of the Win 7 file transfers. Is it your contention that a sudden 77% increase in RAM use during a Win 7 file transfer doesn't qualify as intensive? I think that the vast majority of users would agree that it is quite an intensive increase on an order of magnitude...



I've offered a set of proof in the form of file transfer benchmarks that are legitimately represented and a corroborating opinion from the creator of some of Window's most reliable testing programs aka the comprehensive Sysinternals Suite. I would expect a senior member such as yourself would reciprocate with an equally legitimate proof of your conjecture involving benchmarks and stats of your own and not continue to simply making wildly underestimated, undocumented and unsubstantiated assumptions in the face of not only the legitimately created and submitted documentation, but the word of a Microsoft insider who many say knows more about the inner workings of the Windows OS than anyone else and who wholly contradicts your assumptions concerning the nature of resource consumption during file transfer in Windows that you have yet to refute.

~Maxx~
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My System SpecsSystem Spec
05 Sep 2010   #29
pparks1

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

All I am asking is a time frame of how long those file copies took to happen. I'm not saying that you aren't representing the facts, but your screenshots make it appear that you are getting well over 400MB/s and I don't think this is accurate. I wouldn't want somebody else on this forum to buy one of these drives and assume they will get similar results.

But I've asked numerous times for the amount of time involved, but you keep talking about CPU and RAM usage. Which I comment on the CPU side...but it isn't the main point that I am trying to make.

Clearly it uses CPU and RAM...I don't argue this fact. And I don't want to quantify how much 3% of a particular CPU equates to. Generally speaking, when I see my CPU at 5% or less...it's doing next to nothing. All I want to know is the speed of the transfer. The amount of CPU, core temps and RAM usage doesn't concern me.

Regardless of how fast your CPU and ram might be, or how heavily it is being used....to transfer a file from your C drive to your external Lacie drive means the files must be read from your C drive. And I don't think, in spite of the pictures showing otherwise, that this could possible occur at 430MB/s. I've got an SSD drive in my box and it can only read at about 220MB/s.

Perhaps I've missed the fact that you have a RAID 0 array for your C drive. This could give you a huge bump in speed.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
05 Sep 2010   #30
Maxxwire

Windows 7 x64 Home Premium
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by pparks1 View Post
All I am asking is a time frame of how long those file copies took to happen. I'm not saying that you aren't representing the facts, but your screenshots make it appear that you are getting well over 400MB/s and I don't think this is accurate. I wouldn't want somebody else on this forum to buy one of these drives and assume they will get similar results.
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The screenshots were instantaneous and took place during the transfer precisely when the screenshots say they do which was approximately 1/2 way through the transfer. I just can't do any more to convince you than to show you the screencaptured truth. I do not know if anyone else could get these exact same results because I've had my HP HPE270f less than 2 months, but I guarantee you that I did! And I believe that Mark Russinovich is right about the 1.04 GB of RAM use being responsible for these file transfer speeds that I have dozens of examples of on file.

I'm sad that you are not able to understand what Mark Russinovich is talking about I'm sure that what he is saying is not over your head, but you rather prefer to cast dispersions on the truth of how fast my new Win 7 x64 computer transfers files because you are unwilling to accept his simple truth.

~Maxx~
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 How to copy files between two hard drives faster?




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