Windows 7 Forums
Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: Registry Defragmentation

07 Feb 2011   #1
Buddahfan

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 
Registry Defragmentation

About two months ago I purchased a Dell 570MT Windows 7 X64
4GB RAM
Athlon X240 dual processors

I decided to look for a Windows 7 x64 Registry Defragmentation program to see if I could compact the Registry and speed up the computer.

I found a free Registry Defragmentation program, installed it and ran it.

The software indicated a 9% fragmentation in my Registry and suggested a defragmentation.

I defragmented the Registry and the speed improvement is very noticeable especially in my Web Browser.

I was a bit surprised that after only 2 months the Registry would be fragmented by that much.

Note: I cleaned the Registry before defragmenting it.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
08 Feb 2011   #2
richc46

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 10, Home Clean Install
 
 

Dont use those reg cleaners and defrags on the registry. Not needed by Seven and they usually cause problems
My System SpecsSystem Spec
08 Feb 2011   #3
rap33042

Windows 7 Home Premium x64
 
 

I am not generally a great fan of Registry de-fragmenters since, in inexperienced hands, they can cause more problems than they solve.
That said, I'll dive in.

Registry Fragmentation is not the same type of fragmentation that occurs on hard drives.
Windows reads/writes to/from the registry many times per second.
It also reads the entire, bulky thing when it first starts.

If you're like me and try out a lot of different software, then the registry can become loaded with a lot of left-over kludge from ill-behaved programs that don't properly clean up after themselves.

Windows doesn't know a thing about kludge- it just reads it all in whether it's needed or not. This not only wastes memory but adds to the boot time as well.
In a worst-case scenario it can even cause some problems due to conflict within the registry itself.

On a fast machine, this won't be noticeable, unless, of course, there is a true conflict.

In any case, continual installation & uninstallation of software will leave 'holes' in the registry that take up unnecessary space and cause the registry to grow to huge proportions. Enter defragmentaion utilities.

What they're supposed to do is find the unnecessary entries and close up those 'holes' thereby creating a smaller more efficient registry.

This is great on the face of it. The caveat here is that inexperienced users don't know what is unnecessary and they'll end up allowing these utilities free rein- this can be dangerous and in some cases will result in Windows not being able to boot at all!

The bottom line here, I think, is to make Registry backups religiously before making any changes to the Registry.
It is, after all, the heart of your Windows Operating System and should be protected at all costs.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

08 Feb 2011   #4
Buddahfan

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by rap33042 View Post
I am not generally a great fan of Registry de-fragmenters since, in inexperienced hands, they can cause more problems than they solve.
That said, I'll dive in.

Registry Fragmentation is not the same type of fragmentation that occurs on hard drives.
Windows reads/writes to/from the registry many times per second.
It also reads the entire, bulky thing when it first starts.

If you're like me and try out a lot of different software, then the registry can become loaded with a lot of left-over kludge from ill-behaved programs that don't properly clean up after themselves.

Windows doesn't know a thing about kludge- it just reads it all in whether it's needed or not. This not only wastes memory but adds to the boot time as well.
In a worst-case scenario it can even cause some problems due to conflict within the registry itself.

On a fast machine, this won't be noticeable, unless, of course, there is a true conflict.

In any case, continual installation & uninstallation of software will leave 'holes' in the registry that take up unnecessary space and cause the registry to grow to huge proportions. Enter defragmentaion utilities.

What they're supposed to do is find the unnecessary entries and close up those 'holes' thereby creating a smaller more efficient registry.

This is great on the face of it. The caveat here is that inexperienced users don't know what is unnecessary and they'll end up allowing these utilities free rein- this can be dangerous and in some cases will result in Windows not being able to boot at all!

The bottom line here, I think, is to make Registry backups religiously before making any changes to the Registry.

It is, after all, the heart of your Windows Operating System and should be protected at all costs.
I backup my Registry daily and before any major software installations or if it is software that I am not that familiar with. Doing this has paid off on a number of occasions.

This particular software that I used to defragment the Registry backs it first but just to be safe I ran my daily Registry backup before running this software.

I do agree that a person has to know what they doing whenever they mess with the Registry. If they don't then they should not touch the Registry. I am comfortable using programs to clean and defragment my Registry but only after researching them and feeling comfortable that the risk of them messing up my Registry and computer are minimal.

Bottom line is as far as I can see. If you know what you are doing then cleaning your computer's registry and defragmenting it can be beneficial especially when it comes to eliminating potential conflicts and speeding up the computer.

This is especially true as mentioned above if you install and uninstall a lot of programs. It seems to me based upon my experience that updating software can fragment the Registry and leave a lot of junk behind in your Registry. A number of program updates like those for VLC media player go through and uninstall the old version before installing the update. VLC has had two updates in the last couple of weeks so I am sure that doing these updates has fragmented the Registry and left gunk in the Registry.

So if you use a lot of programs and update them like you should on a regular basis that will also fragment and gunk up your registry.

However, notice that I did not mention the software that I used to defragment the Registry because of the risks involved. Since I don't do this for a living I would personally never recommend a Registry cleaner or defragmenter software but I use them and they work great for me.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
08 Feb 2011   #5
sreedhav

MS Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit SP1
 
 

As Rap33042 said, the "registry" IS the heart of the windows body! Only a heart surgeon(cardio-thoracic) can deal with it! "My slogan" as far as the registry is concerned is "play safe"!
My System SpecsSystem Spec
08 Feb 2011   #6
Buddahfan

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by sreedhav View Post
As Rap33042 said, the "registry" IS the heart of the windows body! Only a heart surgeon(cardio-thoracic) can deal with it! "My slogan" as far as the registry is concerned is "play safe"!
Actually your statement is incorrect.

When a person exercises, eats properly, doesn't smoke, keeps stress to a minimum then they are taking care of their heart. All a heart surgeon does is come in after the person neglected to take care of their heart and as a result it broke down.

Same with a computer Registry. If a person doesn't take care of their computer Registry then they eventually will need a computer technician to fix it when it breaks down.

I prefer to take care of my body/heart and computer and reduce or eliminate the risk and cost of a heart surgeon and/or a computer technician to fix what I broke by not taking care of it.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
08 Feb 2011   #7
Bill2

Windows 7 x64 pro/ Windows 7 x86 Pro/ XP SP3 x86
 
 

Registry files are basically protected text files that occupy hd space like any other file. I just backed up my entire registry and its 268 mb in size. Theres not much installed on this particular computer but if one has large programs, games etc., it could presumably go upto several hundred mbs.

AFAIK, reg defraggers (at least like NTREGOPT) remove blank spaces between reg files (like ordinary defrag). These spaces are created because of deletion of old keys due to software uninstalls etc.

However, its also a fact that the entire registry is loaded into memory at boot and all read/writes are to the memory and only later to the hard disk. So a registry defrag will not give you the performance enhancements of a hd defrag because the latter involves reduction of seek time in a mechanical process. It might give you a small gain.

However, most commercial defrags dont reveal their working methods- so if they are actually going around deleting keys randomly, its best to stay away from them. IMO, it makes sense to forgo a minor and somewhat questionable performance gain to avoid a bigger headache.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
08 Feb 2011   #8
Buddahfan

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Bill2 View Post
Registry files are basically protected text files that occupy hd space like any other file. I just backed up my entire registry and its 268 mb in size. Theres not much installed on this particular computer but if one has large programs, games etc., it could presumably go upto several hundred mbs.

AFAIK, reg defraggers (at least like NTREGOPT) remove blank spaces between reg files (like ordinary defrag). These spaces are created because of deletion of old keys due to software uninstalls etc.

However, its also a fact that the entire registry is loaded into memory at boot and all read/writes are to the memory and only later to the hard disk. So a registry defrag will not give you the performance enhancements of a hd defrag because the latter involves reduction of seek time in a mechanical process. It might give you a small gain.

However, most commercial defrags dont reveal their working methods- so if they are actually going around deleting keys randomly, its best to stay away from them. IMO, it makes sense to forgo a minor and somewhat questionable performance gain to avoid a bigger headache.
The gain that I am having in performance is not questionable. It is very noticeable and in my opinion significant, at least in my case

In addition, since as you wrote the Registry is loaded into memory I have noticed a sizable increase in my available memory as a result of the defragamenting of the Registry. I would say consistently well over 200MB.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
08 Feb 2011   #9
rap33042

Windows 7 Home Premium x64
 
 

This is turning into a metaphorical hub-bub.
It's not any help to anybody.
I'm outta here...
My System SpecsSystem Spec
08 Feb 2011   #10
SIW2

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Vista x64 / 7 X64
 
 

I dunno why people get so emphatic about this subject.

If you are happy with what you did - that's great.

I think the others are trying to discourage the less experienced from playing around with the registry.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 Registry Defragmentation




Thread Tools




Similar help and support threads
Thread Forum
Cancelling defragmentation?
Hello, Just wondering if cancelling defragmentation can cause problems. I am using the windows defragging tool now Partition is 29% fragmented, 2nd partition of hard disk with total volume of 500GB, size of partition is 250GB 1) 24 hours - 28% 2) 34 hours - 30% just 2% Would there be a...
Performance & Maintenance
SSD Defragmentation
I've went through several websites that say you shouldn't defrag your SSD because it's unnecessary, so my question is, why is it unnecessary to defrag an SSD?
Hardware & Devices
Black screen of death after registry defragmentation
hi all, I recently installed iolo system mechanic and decided to defrag my registry, it prompted me that i needed a restart in order to do so, so i did and on startup it did the defrag then restarted again when it was done but the next time i got to the black screen with the cursor just before...
BSOD Help and Support
SSD's and Defragmentation
Hi All: By now the savvy readers of this forum all know that defragmenting a Solid State Drive (SSD) is not only futile but can actually shorten the life of the drive through excessive writes. Now there's another reason that it doesn't make sense. "Solid state drives use a technology...
Hardware & Devices


Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 23:27.
Twitter Facebook Google+ Seven Forums iOS App Seven Forums Android App