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Windows 7: Laptop fan loud continuously loud, crashes later on

20 Sep 2017   #1
volcomslice

Windows 7 64bit, Windows 10 64 Bit
 
 
Laptop fan loud continuously loud, crashes later on

Hi

Last night my device was perfectly fine, however when I woke up and turned it on this morning the fan was really loud and kept staying loud for long periods of time.

Now it sometimes stays on for around 15 minutes but then "clicks" off. After that, I am not able to boot up for around 5-10 minutes. One thing that I did notice was that the fan temperature (on the left of the device) wasn't warm however the speed of the fan was extremely fast, and loud.

(Windows 7)
Dell Latitude e6230
64bit

This is the first time that this has happened to me and I am really confused.

Any suggestions on what I should do?

Thanks for your help in advanced.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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20 Sep 2017   #2
mrjimphelps

Linux Mint 18.2 xfce 64-bit (VMWare host) / Windows 8.1 Pro 32-bit (VMWare guest)
 
 

Sounds like you have an overheating problem. When it begins to overheat, the fan blows and blows to try to cool it down, but it doesn't succeed. Then, when the computer gets to a certain temperature (too hot), the computer shuts down so that it won't get damaged from all the heat.

I'll bet the computer is several years old, since it has Windows 7 on it. So my guess is that there is a lot of dust in it, which is the cause of all of the heat staying in the computer and building up.

Look in the side vents to see if you can see dust. Feel the bottom of the computer -- is it hot? Feel the air coming out of the side -- is it cool? When things are working correctly, there should be hot air coming out of the side of the computer, and the bottom of the computer should not be too hot to touch.

Do you use the computer on a flat, hard surface, or does it sit on something soft, like a blanket? It needs to sit on a flat, hard surface, to allow it to ventilate on the bottom. A computer stand with a built in fan, or with vents, is a good thing to have, to help keep the computer cool.

If dust in the computer is causing it to overheat, then you'll need to disassemble the computer and blow the dust out with a can of compressed air. Dell should have good information about how to disassemble the computer.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
20 Sep 2017   #3
mrjimphelps

Linux Mint 18.2 xfce 64-bit (VMWare host) / Windows 8.1 Pro 32-bit (VMWare guest)
 
 

Here are some things to be aware of when you disassemble a laptop:
  • Have a flat, solid table handy to use as a workbench and as a place you can put the screws and parts you remove from the laptop.
  • Have another computer handy which can get on the internet, so that you can look up help if you need it. (You will, trust me!)
  • Watch some YouTube videos on how to disassemble/assemble your laptop.
  • Print out a set of instructions for how to do it.
  • Get a piece of posterboard and a pen. Whenever you remove any part from the laptop (screw, etc), put it on the posterboard, and draw a rectangle around it. And put "1", "2", etc. in the rectangle, corresponding to the step number that the part(s) was removed from the computer. (e.g. Step 1: Remove all screws from the bottom of the laptop. -- all of those screws should go in rectangle #1 on the posterboard.) And put "1", "2", etc. on the printed instructions, so you will know which step you removed those parts.
  • Get a new CMOS battery, a can of compressed air, an anti-static wrist strap, some good thermal compound such as Arctic Silver 5, some good-quality rubbing alcohol, and some q-tips. While you have the laptop disassembled, you should replace the CMOS battery, and you should reseat the CPU's heat sink with some good quality thermal compound - this will reduce the operating temperature of the computer. The alcohol and q-tips are to clean the surfaces of the CPU and the heat sink. Once the laptop is disassembled, you will blow out all dust with the can of compressed air. You should wear the anti-static wrist strap at all times when you are working on the laptop.
  • Take your time! Go slow and careful all the way through the process. And be very careful that you don't break off any tiny fragile parts.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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20 Sep 2017   #4
volcomslice

Windows 7 64bit, Windows 10 64 Bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
Sounds like you have an overheating problem. When it begins to overheat, the fan blows and blows to try to cool it down, but it doesn't succeed. Then, when the computer gets to a certain temperature (too hot), the computer shuts down so that it won't get damaged from all the heat.

I'll bet the computer is several years old, since it has Windows 7 on it. So my guess is that there is a lot of dust in it, which is the cause of all of the heat staying in the computer and building up.

Look in the side vents to see if you can see dust. Feel the bottom of the computer -- is it hot? Feel the air coming out of the side -- is it cool? When things are working correctly, there should be hot air coming out of the side of the computer, and the bottom of the computer should not be too hot to touch.

Do you use the computer on a flat, hard surface, or does it sit on something soft, like a blanket? It needs to sit on a flat, hard surface, to allow it to ventilate on the bottom. A computer stand with a built in fan, or with vents, is a good thing to have, to help keep the computer cool.

If dust in the computer is causing it to overheat, then you'll need to disassemble the computer and blow the dust out with a can of compressed air. Dell should have good information about how to disassemble the computer.
It isn't hot from where the air comes out on the side and isn't hot under the device. I always use my laptop on a desk, sometimes If I am using it for longer periods of time or I'm using a lot of programs on it, I would put it on 4 milk lids so that there is more air flow.

I will see If I am able to try to do what you suggested in your second post.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
21 Sep 2017   #5
volcomslice

Windows 7 64bit, Windows 10 64 Bit
 
 

Small update >>>
After 54 minutes of the device being on, it turned off as per normal however I took the cover off under the laptop, the fan nor the bronze colour like thing wasn't hot... the fans were going "full speed" the entire time, however, the device wasn't even warm at all once it auto shutdown.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
21 Sep 2017   #6
mrjimphelps

Linux Mint 18.2 xfce 64-bit (VMWare host) / Windows 8.1 Pro 32-bit (VMWare guest)
 
 

If your computer isn't hot, then don't trouble yourself with disassembling it in order to clean it out and change the thermal compound. It's too easy to break tiny fragile parts, that's why I don't recommend that you disassemble it unless it is running hot.

However, if taking the back cover off gives you access to get the dust out, change the CMOS battery, etc., then it would be a good idea to do that stuff. Be sure to do a complete shutdown of Windows (not sleep or hibernate, but shut down), and then remove the battery and the A/C adapter, and then let it sit for a couple of minutes (so all power will completely dissipate) before changing the CMOS battery or doing anything else.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
21 Sep 2017   #7
spike999

(3 comps)Win7-1 ea. Home Premium 32,Home Premium 64,Pro 64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by volcomslice View Post
Small update >>>
After 54 minutes of the device being on, it turned off as per normal however I took the cover off under the laptop, the fan nor the bronze colour like thing wasn't hot... the fans were going "full speed" the entire time, however, the device wasn't even warm at all once it auto shutdown.
If the fan's running full speed yet the heatsink (bronze thing) isn't hot, I think maybe the paste bond is broken or damaged.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Sep 2017   #8
volcomslice

Windows 7 64bit, Windows 10 64 Bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by mrjimphelps View Post
If your computer isn't hot, then don't trouble yourself with disassembling it in order to clean it out and change the thermal compound. It's too easy to break tiny fragile parts, that's why I don't recommend that you disassemble it unless it is running hot.

However, if taking the back cover off gives you access to get the dust out, change the CMOS battery, etc., then it would be a good idea to do that stuff. Be sure to do a complete shutdown of Windows (not sleep or hibernate, but shut down), and then remove the battery and the A/C adapter, and then let it sit for a couple of minutes (so all power will completely dissipate) before changing the CMOS battery or doing anything else.

Not sure how to change those parts however I've taken a photo of under the laptop and of what appears to be some fluf next to the fan and heat sink.


The zoomed in one with the red circle round it shows the "fluf"
If you need any other photos just let me know!
Any suggestions on what to do?


Attached Thumbnails
Laptop fan loud continuously loud, crashes later on-img_0950.jpg   Laptop fan loud continuously loud, crashes later on-img_0951.jpg  
Attached Images
Laptop fan loud continuously loud, crashes later on-img_0952.jpg 
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Sep 2017   #9
mrjimphelps

Linux Mint 18.2 xfce 64-bit (VMWare host) / Windows 8.1 Pro 32-bit (VMWare guest)
 
 

If you feel up to it, it shouldn't be hard to change the thermal compound which affixes the heat sink to the CPU. The heat sink includes the brass piece which circles around the top of the fan. Therefore, you will
* Remove the four screws holding the heat sink down in the middle of the computer, as well as the screws holding down the fan.
* Very carefully and very slowly remove the heat sink and the fan. The heat sink will probably be stuck somewhat to the CPU, so you will very carefully and very slowly move the heat sink back and forth until it comes loose from the CPU.
* Blow out all dust and gunk with a can of compressed air.
* Clean the surfaces of the heat sink and the CPU with alcohol, let them dry, apply a thin layer of good thermal compound to the entire surface of the CPU.
* Carefully reattach the heat sink.
* Reinstall all screws.

I don't see the CMOS battery. You should change it while the computer is open.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Sep 2017   #10
Megahertz07

Windows 7 HP 64
 
 

I don't agree with Mrjimp. Thermal paste don't need to be replaced.
Try this fist:
- With a paper clip, block the fan so it doesn't be allowed to spin and with a vacuum cleaner, put it on the fan intake. It will remove the dust from the heat sink.
- If you have compressed air, block the fan so it doesn't be allowed to spin, blow the air from the heat sink outlet (side of laptop).

I agree that, if you don't have to disassemble all parts, replace the CMOS battery.

Try to find a service manual for your laptop.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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