Windows 7 Forums
Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: What's the Best Anti-virus?

10 Feb 2018   #1251
goodlad

windows 7 ultimate x32
 
 

I had used Bitdefender Free Version earlier, now for the past week or so I'm using Bitdefender Internet Solutions pack. Its good meets all my needs. After nearly 12 years, I have purchased Antivirus ironically the last paid version I used was also Bitdefender, lol !! It was on p4 pc with windows.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
17 Aug 2018   #1252
edassange

W7 Home Premium x86 SP1 Build 7601
 
 

I've been a long time Panda user but some recent well publicised issues with their new Dome range led me to look for a different free AV. I tried a few and all had significant shortcomings apart from Kaspersky's new free version. If anyone's interested it now includes their premium suite's System Watcher which largely fills the previous void of the absence of a dedicated behaviour blocker. Some other new features too.

Even better is Kaspersky Security Cloud Free (you have to register though). Unlike Kaspersky Free it has configurable protection modules and a few more features:
https://www.kaspersky.com/blog/ksc-free-download/23382/

There are a couple of things I don't like though. There appears to be no way of preventing installation of their VPN (Kaspersky Secure Connection) although this is quite easy to uninstall later. Also by default it occasionally advertises its other products but again this can easily be disabled in Notifications.

Other than that I'm very pleased with it.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
18 Aug 2018   #1253
F22 Simpilot

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

I don't believe in anti-virus software since it relies on definitions in large part. I had run a software called Shadow Defender which will virtualize the entire OS so that malware can't touch you at all. If it does a simple reboot is all that is required and all is gone and back to running as before. I tested this program in VMware Player and threw a bunch of malware at it including ransomware, restarted the virtual machine and all was back to normal like nothing ever touched the machine.

The only issue with a virtualize program like Shadow Defender is that you must create several folder and/or file exclusions so that things stick. One is the recycle bin. To find its path you have to go to your folder options under the control panel and show protected files. Under the root of C drive will be $Recycle.Bin. The others will naturally be My Documents, Videos, Photos, downloads, etc, etc, etc. If you intend on updating a program or OS you need to temp disable the
virtualize program and reboot not once but twice. Then update away. If you intend on installing a program do the same thing.


Another program that might be less cumbersome and pretty much equally well suited to catch polymorphic and other malware is Faronics Anti-executable. I have also tried tossing a massive boat load of malware at it and the program asked me if I wanted to allow it to run, thus stopped it in its tracks. If you use Anti-executable, I would not set the option to scan dlls. You'll have a boat load of approval pop ups. Java is alright though.

I used to use Bitdefender Free, and while pretty decent at its detection ability, lightweight and cloud-based to help catch polymorphic malware, it intercepted debugging which is good, but not so good if you use gaming tools like I do or certain gaming hacks. Once such tool that Bitdefender will interfere with is the GenTool used for Command & Conquer. You can still play this.

Another option for malware prevention is Sandboxie. The free version will run your default browser in a sandbox environment so nothing touches your computer without recovery. The free version after 30 days will present a pop up box on browser launch letting you know that you should buy it. It's not that bad, and the security it affords is well worth the price of free. Don't click a p2p magnet link in Sandboxie otherwise the whole thing will stick in the sandbox until fully downloaded.



I have my parents computer run Sandboxie with the Pale Moon browser and Bitdefender Free. I can't use Shadow Defender because for some reason Pale Moon doesn't respond well with it. And since I can't stand the direction Firefox has gone, despise Chrome and Edge, I'm stuck with Pale Moon and Sandboxie. And I used Phoenix and the Mozilla suit years and years ago!


I personally believe OS virtualization is the future of malware prevention.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by edassange View Post
I've been a long time Panda user but some recent well publicised issues with their new Dome range led me to look for a different free AV. I tried a few and all had significant shortcomings apart from Kaspersky's new free version. If anyone's interested it now includes their premium suite's System Watcher which largely fills the previous void of the absence of a dedicated behaviour blocker. Some other new features too.

Even better is Kaspersky Security Cloud Free (you have to register though). Unlike Kaspersky Free it has configurable protection modules and a few more features:
https://www.kaspersky.com/blog/ksc-free-download/23382/

There are a couple of things I don't like though. There appears to be no way of preventing installation of their VPN (Kaspersky Secure Connection) although this is quite easy to uninstall later. Also by default it occasionally advertises its other products but again this can easily be disabled in Notifications.

Other than that I'm very pleased with it.

I wouldn't trust Russian made anti-virus products.


Kaspersky Anti-Virus Can Actually Help Spies Steal Data, Warn Researchers

What the Kaspersky Antivirus Hack Means for Consumers - Consumer Reports
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

18 Aug 2018   #1254
edassange

W7 Home Premium x86 SP1 Build 7601
 
 

Do you think your suggestions for an alternative to a traditional antivirus are going to appeal to your average Joe, or any Joe, for that matter? We're talking solutions here for the typical user. For most people, my advice is to stick to a conventional AV, preferably as part of a layered security approach (I also use OSArmor and VoodooShield).

Regarding Kaspersky products, I also have reservations because of where they are based, but what is mentioned in those articles is also possible to achieve for pretty much every other AV vendor because of the high level of system privileges an antivirus has.

The main cause for concern is, was Kaspersky complicit with the Russian government in spying? Until there is more to go on than ifs, maybes, could, might etc I am prepared to give Kaspersky the benefit of the doubt. If people still have any doubt though then I would advise them to avoid Kaspersky products. The following articles though lead me to believe that Kaspersky is safe to use for the home user, or rather, no more risky than other AVs:

Yes, It's Still Safe to Use Kaspersky Antivirus Software

What the Kaspersky antivirus hack really means | PCWorld

Should You Believe the Rumors About Kaspersky Lab? - PCMag UK

I have an open mind on all of this and if there are further revelations that unequivocally implicate Kaspersky in state inspired spying then clearly people should not be using their products.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Sep 2018   #1255
WyattWhiteEagle

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

I believe any list such as this one should include a category or set of categories for "offline". Seems that AV Software is becoming more and more dependent upon internet connection when the software is started by the user.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Oct 2018   #1256
abbeyon

Win 10 pro 64 bit
 
 

My favorite AV is Avast, using it for couple of years now but there are some vulnerabilities that malwarebytes detect better especially when you system is connected to networks with all kind of activity. Both malwarebytes or avast are good in their uique ways but the best security is to surf wisely a wrong stroke of key can make you a victim.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
1 Week Ago   #1257
zapp22

Windows XP Pro SP3, Windows 7 Pro 32-bit, Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit, Windows XP Home SP3
 
 

This whole topic is evidence of a social phenomenon, not technology. The statistics aren't available but 20+ years of experience tells me the believers are all over 50, and the marketplace for "all you need" "antivirus" packaged goods will die with the generation that can't unbelieve in it.
I am 'triggered' by once again going through the debris of a laptop compromised by malware [not "virus"... I'll get to the moniker]. Totally unsurprising to me it was clear the owner was one of your crowd: the "AV Cult of Believers". I'm sure somewhere she read of "layers", and being smarter than the entire cybersecurity industry she loaded on AVG and Avast and whatever. Lost most of her files though I was able to dredge off a little less than 2GB worth after the prior tech had thrown his hands up and said "nuke it". Then I had a long discussion with 2 other people also over age 50 on the same lines. And as before, I knew going into the discussion that they would, by the end, shoot the messenger.... or at least affirm their belief, that their beliefs are "facts", and that the industry [the real one...IT, Cybersecurity, real Software Development, brightest/best minds] are full of horse manure. In the midst of the fruitless Quixotic Quest to deprogram their minds, one of them joyfully sent a text saying they got the "best greatest Deal!" on Cyber-Monday-after or some sale, on one of the most heavily advertised [where all the money goes... it ain't to R&D] ALL-Total-Uber-Super "AV" packages, one that is known to be spammy. I sent a link to article about their nefarious ownership and track record of spam/scam, selling user data, etc.
I have a friendly competitor nearby who has actually done really well in tech support for the demographic that unwaveringly believes in the VIRUS hiding under their bed that will leap on their precious PC and cause havoc, and believes they know the industry, and believes in this package or that.... He is clever enough to exploit the mental triggers. He uses "Virus" in his limited advertising, sells "Virus Removal" services both personal and on-site [for high $$], and laughs to the bank. I talked with him about the realities and he just said, effectively, "let 'em eat cake". Touche'.

I have also observed a tertiary pathology with the AV demographic; that they will be prone to jump on clickbait "Tech Support Scare" tactics. People I have done great work for... they won't even take a minute to call and inquire of me or some other rational person that spends many hours on such topics. But after the CC# has been handed over to some voice on the PC or Phone, and somebody has seized control of their PC and moved things here and there, convincing them that they are doing heroic things for them that will "Remove all the VIRUSES AND TROJANS", and "Permanently innoculate your system from VIRUSES" for only $$ per month.... then they start to wonder if they fell prey. Then they call.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
1 Week Ago   #1258
Laith

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by zapp22 View Post
This whole topic is evidence of a social phenomenon, not technology. The statistics aren't available but 20+ years of experience tells me the believers are all over 50, and the marketplace for "all you need" "antivirus" packaged goods will die with the generation that can't unbelieve in it.
I am 'triggered' by once again going through the debris of a laptop compromised by malware [not "virus"... I'll get to the moniker]. Totally unsurprising to me it was clear the owner was one of your crowd: the "AV Cult of Believers". I'm sure somewhere she read of "layers", and being smarter than the entire cybersecurity industry she loaded on AVG and Avast and whatever. Lost most of her files though I was able to dredge off a little less than 2GB worth after the prior tech had thrown his hands up and said "nuke it". Then I had a long discussion with 2 other people also over age 50 on the same lines. And as before, I knew going into the discussion that they would, by the end, shoot the messenger.... or at least affirm their belief, that their beliefs are "facts", and that the industry [the real one...IT, Cybersecurity, real Software Development, brightest/best minds] are full of horse manure. In the midst of the fruitless Quixotic Quest to deprogram their minds, one of them joyfully sent a text saying they got the "best greatest Deal!" on Cyber-Monday-after or some sale, on one of the most heavily advertised [where all the money goes... it ain't to R&D] ALL-Total-Uber-Super "AV" packages, one that is known to be spammy. I sent a link to article about their nefarious ownership and track record of spam/scam, selling user data, etc.
I have a friendly competitor nearby who has actually done really well in tech support for the demographic that unwaveringly believes in the VIRUS hiding under their bed that will leap on their precious PC and cause havoc, and believes they know the industry, and believes in this package or that.... He is clever enough to exploit the mental triggers. He uses "Virus" in his limited advertising, sells "Virus Removal" services both personal and on-site [for high $$], and laughs to the bank. I talked with him about the realities and he just said, effectively, "let 'em eat cake". Touche'.

I have also observed a tertiary pathology with the AV demographic; that they will be prone to jump on clickbait "Tech Support Scare" tactics. People I have done great work for... they won't even take a minute to call and inquire of me or some other rational person that spends many hours on such topics. But after the CC# has been handed over to some voice on the PC or Phone, and somebody has seized control of their PC and moved things here and there, convincing them that they are doing heroic things for them that will "Remove all the VIRUSES AND TROJANS", and "Permanently innoculate your system from VIRUSES" for only $$ per month.... then they start to wonder if they fell prey. Then they call.
Waking me up from my inactivity, eh?

For your information, I'm currently 15 and I'm a strong believer in antiviruses. I deem them necessary for most people because getting infected with malware or bloat is very common nowadays and that can be seen on basically every "home" computer that is owned by a non-tech savvy family. I got myself 1 year of F-Secure for free and I couldn't be happier. The antivirus does what it does and protects me whenever I download suspicious stuff. On top of F-Secure, I rock Malwarebytes. Ever since I first installed Malwarebytes way back, I've sworn by it. Literally every computer should have it installed, it's just that essential. You don't even need to have an antivirus, just having Malwarebytes works.

Now you could make the argument that applying common sense into whatever you're doing is good enough, but even then, you wouldn't convince me to switch. Sure, common scene works most of the time, but you can get infected through certain exploits by visiting shady sites, even if you happen to misclick into the site or something.

Not to mention that trusted sites can also get infected, the other day a forum I used to browse was infected and had a cryptocurrency miner running in the background, you could argue that a cryptocurrency miner isn't an infection, and it isn't, but it's still an "exploit".

I will though give you a point on the "stacking" of antiviruses, that indeed doesn't do anything but make the computer slower.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
1 Week Ago   #1259
zapp22

Windows XP Pro SP3, Windows 7 Pro 32-bit, Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit, Windows XP Home SP3
 
 

It might be time to stop using antivirus | Ars Technica


Antivirus is Dead: Long Live Antivirus! — Krebs on Security


[SCAM ALERT] Is TotalAV a Total SCAM?


Facts only ever serve to harden the foreheads of believers in a cultlike situation :)
The believer is convinced of their superiority, and suspicious of people like me, or any number of industry executives, real cybersecurity professionals, young 4.0 graduates going to work in the financial industry on wall street, or consultants that get paid hundreds of thousands for their expertise on these matters. It won't make a dent.


I'm not picking on anyone, i just find it fascinating to observe how well-defined and bizarre this little shrinking corner of the galaxy is. And the more time/effort spent on such games, that resource is subtracted from real security measures.
but.... I know guys my age that swear that Quaker State straight 40 weight "oil" will solve all automobile problems, and magically transform old beaters into luxury vehicles that will run a million miles. As evidence of their view, they will say they've been using it religiously since their grandfather handed them a quart 30 years ago, and "I've never had a problem". Therefore, "never had a problem" means the oil charm "works". [usually under close cross-examination one will find that they've rebuilt the motor, replaced the transmission, cut off the cat, added an oil cooler...., but all that was "routine maintenance"]
My System SpecsSystem Spec
1 Week Ago   #1260
lehnerus2000

W7 Ultimate SP1, LM18.3 MATE, W10 Home, #All 64 bit
 
 

The advice, "Don't use an AV", is no better than the advice, "Use an AV".

Since companies swapped over to the Agile Development model, the majority of software is garbage code these days.
Relying on MS (or others) to correctly code their products is a recipe for disaster.

Multiple independent and isolated Backup Images are the only way to protect yourself now.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 What's the Best Anti-virus?




Thread Tools




Similar help and support threads
Thread Forum
Avast Free anti-virus : unwanted anti-spam toolbar in Outlook 2003
Hi, I have had Avast Free anti-virus for a long time. At some point, after an automatic upgrade, all my messages in Outlook 2003 got an added anti-spam toolbar from Avast. I don't want it. I did not find any way to make it go away from inside Outlook. It does not appear as an add-on in the...
System Security
Test your anti-malware/anti-virus protection with EICAR
As many of you know(quite a few don't) what EICAR is, this is a open poll to see what programs pick it up and what programs fail the basic tests. I am conducting this poll because A-Squared failed to see this on a scan, but MSE picked it up before it could be downloaded. So after you take...
System Security
BSOD 00x50 vipre anti-virus conflicting with new anti-virus
I did a bonehead move of installing PC tools anti-virus before uninstalling vipre on my wife who's out of town. The kids infected it playing flash games. long story short, Her Gateway (win7 home premium) is on a a start-up loop. All I can get to work with a recovery disk is get into the DOS prompt...
BSOD Help and Support
Anti-malware, Anti-virus, Anti-spyware
First of all i would like to apologize if this topic is in wrong category, or it should not even be asked on this site. And second of all, please be patience :) i'm a noob looking for answers :o So whats all about? Well i'm meeting new terms here and i have no idea what they mean and what they do....
System Security
How to Remove Win 7 Anti-Spyware 2011 (Fake Anti-Virus Infections)
How to Remove Win 7 Anti-Spyware 2011 (Fake Anti-Virus Infections) Source ...
System Security


Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:05.
Twitter Facebook Google+