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Windows 7: Going from 32-bit Win7 to 64-bit Win7

3 Weeks Ago   #11
ToughDiamond

Win 7 Pro 32-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Marie SWE View Post
ToughDiamond
I read your first post and I got the feeling that you want to keep win7 but that you want to switch to win7 64bit version. Is that correct or would you rather upgrade to win10 64bit?
Yes that's correct, I want to go from 32-bit to 64-bit and I want to keep Win7, if that turns out to be a reasonable thing to do.

Thanks for your clear, detailed answer, Bree. There's a lot there that will be useful to me and I hope to have more to say later. It's been a long day.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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3 Weeks Ago   #12
SIW2

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Vista x64 / 7 X64
 
 

Quote:
Yes that's correct, I want to go from 32-bit to 64-bit and I want to keep Win7, if that turns out to be a reasonable thing to do.
should be easy enough.

Backup the activation from your current 32 bit installation.

Install the 64 bit pro.

Restore the activation.

HERE

Then run simplix update pack to install the updates without telemetry and other unwanted stuff.

Download Simplix UpdatePack 7 - MajorGeeks
My System SpecsSystem Spec
3 Weeks Ago   #13
Marie SWE

2xWin8.1, 1xWin7HomeX64, 2xWin7Prox64, 1xWin2008R2server. 1xXP Pro, 1xWin 2k, 1x98SE,3.11 LinuxLMDE3
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ToughDiamond View Post
Yes that's correct, I want to go from 32-bit to 64-bit and I want to keep Win7, if that turns out to be a reasonable thing to do.

Thanks for your clear, detailed answer, Bree. There's a lot there that will be useful to me and I hope to have more to say later. It's been a long day.
For my HP computers, I ordered recovery discs from HP. That way I didn't have to install drivers, extra software and so on.
When I used the recovery discs, I was given the option of choosing if I wanted to install 32bit or 64bit.
It says it costs money(39.28), but it was free here in sweden, so you might be lucky that it's free in your country too.
I did called them instead of ordering online, maybe that's why it was free, because it is an old operating system

Order recovery media: HP PCs - Obtaining PC Recovery USB Drives or Discs | HP(R) Customer Support

when i clicked the link to order i ended up on this page: HP Recovery Media | Best2Serve

Give it a try before you test third-party solutions.
It's always fun to have the original media to a OEM computer.
I found the phone number through my country's phonebook when I couldn't find it through their website.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

3 Weeks Ago   #14
SIW2

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Vista x64 / 7 X64
 
 

You were fortuinate to get it free. 39 is quite expensive for recovery media. Particularly when you consider that win10 pro with license is only 39.99.
Computeractive Software Store - Windows 10 Professional - 80% off RRP

That win10 offer is only useful for those who

1. Like win10

and

2. Don't already have something they can use for the free "upgrade".

Might be useful if you have an old machine without slic and no spare win7 keys that could be used to install win7

Or perhaps buying a new machine from custom manufacturers such as palicomp, you could untick the OS from selection, which reduces the price

https://www.palicomp.co.uk/intel-mercury-cof9
My System SpecsSystem Spec
3 Weeks Ago   #15
SIW2

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Vista x64 / 7 X64
 
 

Quote:
For my HP computers, I ordered recovery discs from HP. That way I didn't have to install drivers, extra software and so on.
For people who can't get hold of that free and easily:

export the 3rd party drivers and activation from your current installation. Keep it somewhere safe - in a folder on external HD for example.

dism++ makes that very easy

Dism++10.1.1000.100.zip


My System SpecsSystem Spec
3 Weeks Ago   #16
Marie SWE

2xWin8.1, 1xWin7HomeX64, 2xWin7Prox64, 1xWin2008R2server. 1xXP Pro, 1xWin 2k, 1x98SE,3.11 LinuxLMDE3
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by SIW2 View Post
You were fortuinate to get it free. 39 is quite expensive for recovery media. Particularly when you consider that win10 pro with license is only 39.99.
Computeractive Software Store - Windows 10 Professional - 80% off RRP

That win10 offer is only useful for those who

1. Like win10

and

2. Don't already have something they can use for the free "upgrade".

Might be useful if you have an old vista machine and no spare win7/8/8.1 keys that could be used for free "upgrade"
Yes I was lucky to get it for free. But I was thinking that ToughDiamond might have such luck too as win7 is old operating system and 39 may only apply to new computers.
The question to HP is free, so why not ask.

I will never ever install win10 spyware on any of my computers or my family's computers. Not even if I get it for free or if I get paid to use it.
win10 home and pro monitor keystrokes and browser history and much more.

Watch this video and related links in the comments section.... Never ever win10 home or pro in my lifetime..
YouTube
His video description:
-----------------------

In this video, I am going over the question everyone is asking... Is Microsoft Spying on You? Also, I will be showing whether you should Disable Telemetry or Leave it on.

What Telemetry Captures
-Browsing history
-Device Connectivity and Configuration; settings and peripheral data
-Inking Typing and Speech Utterance; keyboard and microphone captures
-Product and Service Performance; reliability data and file queries
-Product and Service Usage; uptime, apps used, OS info
-Software Setup and Inventory; installs and updates for applications

Disable Telemetry Pros
-Your keystrokes, browser history, device information isn't sitting in a repository at Microsoft
-Avoiding possible security issues that can arise from Microsoft hosting this information (Government Agencies, Hackers, etc.)

Disable Telemetry Cons
-Blocking Windows Updates
-Hosts file blocks can mess with Skype Messages
-Windows Store Issues
-Issues with integrated tools like Defender / OneDrive
-Can cause issues with future feature updates
**Using Minimal "Basic" Option because of the Cons above is recommended

Disabling Instructions
O&O Shutup 10
Disable Windows 7 Telemetry
Remove telemetry updates for Windows 7 and 8.1 . GitHub

Sources:
Should You Disable Windows 10 Telemetry? - Smart Buyer
Windows 10 telemetry secrets: Where, when, and why Microsoft collects your data | ZDNet
How to Fix Windows 10 Microsoft Compatibility Telemetry High Disk Usage - EaseUS
What Do Windows 10’s Basic and Full Telemetry Settings Actually Do?
Why You Shouldn’t Use “Anti-Spying” Tools for Windows 10
Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit - Wikipedia

------------------------
My System SpecsSystem Spec
3 Weeks Ago   #17
ToughDiamond

Win 7 Pro 32-bit
 
 

I'm very grateful to Bree, S1W2, and Marie SWE for all this excellent advice about the different possible paths to W7 64-bit, and I'm currently looking at those ideas, links and downloads. I had no idea the "how to" of it could be so involved. So before I decide on the exact details of how I'm going to make the switch to 64-bit, it seems logical to first decide which OS (W10 or W7) would be the wisest one to go for. That way, if worst comes to worst and W10 "wins," I can just follow the TenForums tutorial which seems to be pretty simple and bulletproof, and if I end up opting for W7 then I can ignore that and choose my path from the suggestions in this here thread.
. . .I very much want it to be W7 so I can avoid all the W10 spyware and stick with the OS that I'm familiar with, but so many people out there seem to take it as read that sticking with the now obselete W7 would be a wrong move. Here are the only reasons I can see (so far) for their attitude:

1. W7 would be more vulnerable to malware and viruses,
2. New software and updates to existing software wouldn't work in W7,
3. It would mean missing out on useful new features in W10,
4. There are fixes for anything nasty (such as spyware) in W10, and
5. 64-bit W10 is free for legal W7 users while 64-bit W7 might cost a few pounds.

So here's my thinking so far on those points.

Vulnerability to malware and viruses (security):
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Bree
The security risks should be the same for 32 or 64 bit W7. An upgrade to W10 (32 or 64 bit) would have the latest security patches and continuing support.
How much more secure than W7 would W10 be? Is security an OS thing or a browser thing? If it's a browser thing, my Firefox updates seem more interested in whether my OS is 64- or 32-bit than whether it's 7 or 10, so I'm hoping that with 64 bits they'll update me just like they would if I had 10. I've used nothing but Firefox for browsing, with the plugins NoScript and CleanLinks. I know almost nothing about security problems that don't arise from browsing the Web, and have pretty much ignored that angle. Have I been skating on thin ice without knowing it?
New software and software updates:
Again, I'm hoping the use of 64-bit Windows will be enough. So far the only new programs and updates that have refused to work for me have done so on the grounds of their not supporting 32-bit any more. But then I've not installed many new programs or updates, so I don't know if my experiences are very representative. What do you think?
Fixes for nasty content in Win 10:
I gather a lot can be done to beat 10 into submission, but I've also heard rumours that the spyware can't be completely killed. I gather Cortana can be disabled but only at the expense of losing the search box in the Windows start menu, and that doing any kind of search with 10, even for a local file, gives a Bing search.
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Marie SWE
I will never ever install win10 spyware on any of my computers or my family's computers. Not even if I get it for free or if I get paid to use it.
win10 home and pro monitor keystrokes and browser history and much more.

Watch this video and related links in the comments section.... Never ever win10 home or pro in my lifetime..
YouTube
His video description:
-----------------------

In this video, I am going over the question everyone is asking... Is Microsoft Spying on You? Also, I will be showing whether you should Disable Telemetry or Leave it on.

What Telemetry Captures
-Browsing history
-Device Connectivity and Configuration; settings and peripheral data
-Inking Typing and Speech Utterance; keyboard and microphone captures
-Product and Service Performance; reliability data and file queries
-Product and Service Usage; uptime, apps used, OS info
-Software Setup and Inventory; installs and updates for applications

Disable Telemetry Pros
-Your keystrokes, browser history, device information isn't sitting in a repository at Microsoft
-Avoiding possible security issues that can arise from Microsoft hosting this information (Government Agencies, Hackers, etc.)

Disable Telemetry Cons
-Blocking Windows Updates
-Hosts file blocks can mess with Skype Messages
-Windows Store Issues
-Issues with integrated tools like Defender / OneDrive
-Can cause issues with future feature updates
**Using Minimal "Basic" Option because of the Cons above is recommended

Disabling Instructions
O&O Shutup 10
Disable Windows 7 Telemetry
Remove telemetry updates for Windows 7 and 8.1 . GitHub

Sources:
Should You Disable Windows 10 Telemetry? - Smart Buyer
Windows 10 telemetry secrets: Where, when, and why Microsoft collects your data | ZDNet
How to Fix Windows 10 Microsoft Compatibility Telemetry High Disk Usage - EaseUS
What Do Windows 10’s Basic and Full Telemetry Settings Actually Do?
Why You Shouldn’t Use “Anti-Spying” Tools for Windows 10
Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit - Wikipedia
OMG! Looks like simply killing Cortana wouldn't be nearly enough then, and I can well understand your "Never 10" attitude. So, if a user did everything they reasonably could to thwart the spyware content in 10, what working spyware would they still have to accept? And if the user really went to town on this and killed all the spyware it was humanly possible to kill, would that be enough, and what useful features would also perish in the cleansing? Anything lost that didn't have a good (free or cheap) 3rd-party substitute?
. . .Has anybody written a unified, simple-to-use utility that makes the whole battle possible without investing weeks of time and tears into the process? It strikes me that without such a utility, or at least a single, comprehensive tutorial on how to do it all manually, the biggest problem is the fragmented nature of the subject - a user could spend a long time doing their best to fix everything they could, and they still wouldn't know they hadn't missed something. So, if your time was limited and you wanted the most complete one-stop shop to show you how to do the whole job, where would you go?
Cost:
It looks like 64-bit Win10 activation would be free for me as a legal 7 user, as long as MS don't pull the offer. There's a good chance that 64-bit 7 would be free too (S1W2's activation backup and restore looks very easy and promising, thanks for that - and if it doesn't work, you never know, HP might respond well to a phone call). I gather the unactivated version of 10 runs almost as well as the activated version. What does 7 do if it's not activated?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
3 Weeks Ago   #18
Bree

Windows 7 Home Premium x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ToughDiamond View Post
...before I decide on the exact details of how I'm going to make the switch to 64-bit, it seems logical to first decide which OS (W10 or W7) would be the wisest one to go for.
Yes, the easiest path to a 64-bit OS depends on which one you want to end up with. W10 x64 is the easier of the two, upgrade 7 to 32-bit w10 then clean install 64-bit. W7 x64 is doable, but a bit more work.

Should you go for W10 you'll find both S1W2 and myself (and many other regulars) over on Ten Forums.

Quote:
. . .I very much want it to be W7 so I can avoid all the W10 spyware and stick with the OS that I'm familiar with, but so many people out there seem to take it as read that sticking with the now obsolete W7 would be a wrong move...
I'm agnostic. I have both W10 and W7 machines. I prefer W10, but that's just me. S1W2 may prefer W7...

Quote:
How much more secure than W7 would W10 be? Is security an OS thing or a browser thing?
Definitely an OS thing. Look at the list of security fixes for W7 here, for example...
KB4525235 Security Monthly Quality Rollup update Windows 7 - Nov. 12

Quote:
I gather a lot can be done to beat 10 into submission, but I've also heard rumours that the spyware can't be completely killed. ... So, if your time was limited and you wanted the most complete one-stop shop to show you how to do the whole job, where would you go?
You can go too far in disabling W10 telemetry. A hack to far may cause windows update problems. I set reporting to Basic, turn off all background apps and deny all permissions in Privacy. That makes Cortana dormant and reduces telemetry to little more than app crash stats, which MS use to fix OS bugs.

Quote:
I gather the unactivated version of 10 runs almost as well as the activated version. What does 7 do if it's not activated?
Using either unactivated is a violation of the EULA and cannot be encouraged here or on Ten Forums. W7 is a little more draconian than W10 in that after 30 days windows update ceases to work. Both have regular reminders to activate and the desktop background is set to black. Personalisation functions are disabled.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
3 Weeks Ago   #19
SIW2

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Vista x64 / 7 X64
 
 

Quote:
Is security an OS thing or a browser thing?
Quote:
far removed from the fearmongering noise you get on the Internet.
A good computer security practice comes in layers. You need a reasonable network solution, which means a robust and reliable firewall, and this is often solved by using a router that isn't set to lax defaults. Then, you have the Internet-facing element, and here, you need robust and up-to-date browsers. Firefox and Chrome will do. Lastly, you have the foobar element - which is what happens when things go wrong. Indeed, when that does occur, you need to: a) minimize damage b) ensure the integrity of your data.
..So what about system updates?

Indeed, what about them? As you can see, in my list, I've not mentioned system updates at any point. In most cases, they aren't really that important. They can be useful in addressing various bugs, including stability fixes, but it's not a do-or-die situation. The world is not going to end if you don't patch your system for some time.
I have no issue continuing to use win7 for a long while yet. Firewall, up to date browser ( don't use ie11), better mail client (e.g. thunderbird). And for the paranoid, MS will continue to provide definitions for security essentials on win7 till 2023. Other anti virus providers will probably keep going longer than that.

In the unlikely event that something crops up, MS will issue a fix - like they did for the spectre/meltdown.

One could always run simplix update pack every month.

Download:
Small downloader which can be run to download the pack itself - it currently downloads UpdatePack7R2-20.2.21.exe ( about 850mb)
https://update7.simplix.info/UpdatePack7R2.exe

OR
Download Simplix UpdatePack 7 - MajorGeeks
My System SpecsSystem Spec
3 Weeks Ago   #20
ToughDiamond

Win 7 Pro 32-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Bree View Post
Yes, the easiest path to a 64-bit OS depends on which one you want to end up with. W10 x64 is the easier of the two, upgrade 7 to 32-bit w10 then clean install 64-bit. W7 x64 is doable, but a bit more work.
Should you go for W10 you'll find both S1W2 and myself (and many other regulars) over on Ten Forums.
On perusal of the situation, I'm leaning towards 7 - no reason why I can't also pursue 10 and keep it as a doomsday option - and yes, TenForums is just the place to thrash out the practicalities of that. I see one or two users have reported success there in going from 32-bit 7 to 64-bit 10. Which simplifies this here thread down to the pros and cons of sticking with 7 and the "how to" of succesfully installing and running the 64-bit version.
I don't know much about how the outside world can attack a computer in a non-browser way, but I take your point that there's more to strong security than keeping Firefox up to date.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by SIW2 View Post
I have no issue continuing to use win7 for a long while yet. Firewall, up to date browser ( don't use ie11), better mail client (e.g. thunderbird). And for the paranoid, MS will continue to provide definitions for security essentials on win7 till 2023. Other anti virus providers will probably keep going longer than that.
Luckily I've long since forsaken IE for Firefox and Microsoft's email client for Thunderbird, so no change needed there. Any recommendations for a decent 3rd-party firewall?

Quote:
And for the paranoid, MS will continue to provide definitions for security essentials on win7 till 2023. Other anti virus providers will probably keep going longer than that.
Quote:
One could always run simplix update pack every month.
Would Simplix bring an old version of Win7 completely up to date? Or are the MS .iso files always up to date anyway?

Here's something that worries me:

I gather from this:
Where to Download Windows 10, 8.1, and 7 ISOs Legally
that MS won't give me a .iso of Win7 from here:
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/soft...nload/windows7
because if I enter my OEM license key it won't work.
HowToGeek recommends I use this (purportedly legal) download tool instead:
Microsoft Windows and Office ISO Download Tool
That looks easy enough, and there are a couple of suggestions on this very thread about how to activate the new OS once I've installed it, but given that my existing license key is OEM, won't MS refuse to activate it, just like they'd refuse to let me download it by the front door? In short, as things stand am I legally entitled to a free 64-bit Win7 at all?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Going from 32-bit Win7 to 64-bit Win7




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