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Windows 7: Going from 32-bit Win7 to 64-bit Win7

3 Weeks Ago   #21
SIW2

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Vista x64 / 7 X64
 
 

Quote:
Any recommendations for a decent 3rd-party firewall?
Windows 7 sofware firewall is fine.


All routers have a graphical control panel through which its various functions and settings can be modified. The control panel can be accessed only through a wired connection and by authentication with username and password.

Using the default, factory-set password may allow a potential villain to access and change your router settings without your permission. Therefore, it's wise to alter the password the moment you start working with your device. You should use a strong password, containing alpha-numeric characters.


Router security


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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3 Weeks Ago   #22
SIW2

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Vista x64 / 7 X64
 
 

You only need one official installation iso file. Whatever the name -Ultimate, Professional, Home Premium - they all contain all the editions.

Easiest way is to use this and point it at the iso.
eicfg_removal_utility.zip

Then when you install, all editions will be offerred, choose the one you have a license for.

Going from 32-bit Win7 to 64-bit Win7-editions.jpg

Another way to do the same thing:

extract the iso, e.g create a bootable usb stick using Usb7ice.zip

Then on the usb stick look inside the sources folder for a little file called ei.cfg and delete it.

That is because windows setup looks at ei.cfg and offers to install the edition that is listed there. If there is no ei.cfg, it offers all the editions as in the picture above.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
3 Weeks Ago   #23
ToughDiamond

Win 7 Pro 32-bit
 
 

Thanks S1W2. I should be good to go with the .iso file now. And the ei.cfg trick may be helpful.

I didn't know routers could be so vulnerable in their default state, or that they could be configured.

I like the look of Usb7ice - previously I've always used RUFUS for making bootable drives, but this one looks simpler to use.

Good to hear that the Win7 firewall will be adequate. I guess those things don't really need updating.
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3 Weeks Ago   #24
SIW2

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Vista x64 / 7 X64
 
 

My System SpecsSystem Spec
3 Weeks Ago   #25
Marie SWE

2xWin8.1, 1xWin7HomeX64, 2xWin7Prox64, 1xWin2008R2server. 1xXP Pro, 1xWin 2k, 1x98SE,3.11 LinuxLMDE3
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ToughDiamond View Post
I'm very grateful to Bree, S1W2, and Marie SWE for all this excellent advice about the different possible paths to W7 64-bit, and I'm currently looking at those ideas, links and downloads. I had no idea the "how to" of it could be so involved. So before I decide on the exact details of how I'm going to make the switch to 64-bit, it seems logical to first decide which OS (W10 or W7) would be the wisest one to go for. That way, if worst comes to worst and W10 "wins," I can just follow the TenForums tutorial which seems to be pretty simple and bulletproof, and if I end up opting for W7 then I can ignore that and choose my path from the suggestions in this here thread.
. . .I very much want it to be W7 so I can avoid all the W10 spyware and stick with the OS that I'm familiar with, but so many people out there seem to take it as read that sticking with the now obselete W7 would be a wrong move. Here are the only reasons I can see (so far) for their attitude:

1. W7 would be more vulnerable to malware and viruses,
2. New software and updates to existing software wouldn't work in W7,
3. It would mean missing out on useful new features in W10,
4. There are fixes for anything nasty (such as spyware) in W10, and
5. 64-bit W10 is free for legal W7 users while 64-bit W7 might cost a few pounds.

So here's my thinking so far on those points.

Vulnerability to malware and viruses (security):

How much more secure than W7 would W10 be? Is security an OS thing or a browser thing? If it's a browser thing, my Firefox updates seem more interested in whether my OS is 64- or 32-bit than whether it's 7 or 10, so I'm hoping that with 64 bits they'll update me just like they would if I had 10. I've used nothing but Firefox for browsing, with the plugins NoScript and CleanLinks. I know almost nothing about security problems that don't arise from browsing the Web, and have pretty much ignored that angle. Have I been skating on thin ice without knowing it?
New software and software updates:
Again, I'm hoping the use of 64-bit Windows will be enough. So far the only new programs and updates that have refused to work for me have done so on the grounds of their not supporting 32-bit any more. But then I've not installed many new programs or updates, so I don't know if my experiences are very representative. What do you think?
Fixes for nasty content in Win 10:
I gather a lot can be done to beat 10 into submission, but I've also heard rumours that the spyware can't be completely killed. I gather Cortana can be disabled but only at the expense of losing the search box in the Windows start menu, and that doing any kind of search with 10, even for a local file, gives a Bing search.

OMG! Looks like simply killing Cortana wouldn't be nearly enough then, and I can well understand your "Never 10" attitude. So, if a user did everything they reasonably could to thwart the spyware content in 10, what working spyware would they still have to accept? And if the user really went to town on this and killed all the spyware it was humanly possible to kill, would that be enough, and what useful features would also perish in the cleansing? Anything lost that didn't have a good (free or cheap) 3rd-party substitute?
. . .Has anybody written a unified, simple-to-use utility that makes the whole battle possible without investing weeks of time and tears into the process? It strikes me that without such a utility, or at least a single, comprehensive tutorial on how to do it all manually, the biggest problem is the fragmented nature of the subject - a user could spend a long time doing their best to fix everything they could, and they still wouldn't know they hadn't missed something. So, if your time was limited and you wanted the most complete one-stop shop to show you how to do the whole job, where would you go?
Cost:
It looks like 64-bit Win10 activation would be free for me as a legal 7 user, as long as MS don't pull the offer. There's a good chance that 64-bit 7 would be free too (S1W2's activation backup and restore looks very easy and promising, thanks for that - and if it doesn't work, you never know, HP might respond well to a phone call). I gather the unactivated version of 10 runs almost as well as the activated version. What does 7 do if it's not activated?
I agree with the others, win7 will not be safe in the future.
I will use my win7 computers until a serious security threat is detected through windows update. when it happens I will only use my win7 computers offline to my win-programs as I have to use because they isn't available on Linux yet.

A small question.
How dependent are you to windows? I mean, what programs are you using in windows?

watch this video, it brings up various options that we win7 users have after EOL
YouTube

This one explains a bit between win10 VS linux. Well explained.
YouTube

If you want to use win10 then these two videos are good as they explain and show you how to remove lots of junk from win10
Minimal installation of win10 YouTube
Disable telemetry win10 YouTube


.
I really like his youtube channel, because he is good at explaining things that are technical but makes it sounds simple. And he constantly shows how to go step by step.
YouTube


I will keep using win7 for another five to ten years ahead. Now I have been using dual boot with Linux on my computers for almost two years now and Linux is my primary OS for almost a year now
My dualboot choice is Fedora for desktops and LMDE for my laptops.

Look through his videos and consider about having linux on an old computer to see if it might be a future solution for you.
The advantage of linux is that old computers become like new again, since linux is not as heavy as windows.
But it is a learning curve so start with having a separate computer to start playing around with.

The hardest thing I experienced was to stop thinking windows, windows and again windows.
Once the win-thoughts stopped everything did get a lot easier.


That's my little tip to those who aren't fond of the win10 idea.
Have a nice day
//Marie
My System SpecsSystem Spec
3 Weeks Ago   #26
ToughDiamond

Win 7 Pro 32-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Marie SWE View Post
How dependent are you to windows? I mean, what programs are you using in windows?
Fairly dependent, I think. For 20 years I've gradually honed Windows and some 3rd-party Windows programs to do what I want with as little fuss and bother as possible. Here's a list of the programs I currently use:
Using Windows XP Mode (Windows Virtual PC) in Windows 7 32-bit:
Emagic Logic Audio Platinum 5.5 (with lots of plugins, soundfonts etc.)
DbPowerAmp
Using Windows 7 32-bit:
Adobe Audition 1.5
Audacity Portable 2.3.2
Reaper 0999 (Last freeware version)
Goldwave 5.7
ISSE (sound separation)
Melody Separation Tool (sound separation)
Media Player Classic HC
VLC Portable
Windows DVD Maker
DVDFab (DVD ripper)
DVDFabPasskey8209 (to watch DVDs region free)
YouTube-dl (command-line YouTube video downloader)
My Mp4Box (for splitting, joining, muxing and demuxing Mp4s)
Pazera_Video_Converters_Suite(1.4)
Mp3gain (adjusts gains of Mp3s to similar subjective levels)
CUETools_2.1.6 (CD ripper)
CD Burner XP 4.5.7.6282
Viper for Windows (audio graphic equaliser and compressor)
MIDI To Mp3
Go Minimal (MIDI to text convertor)
Mozilla Firefox with plugins NoScript, AdBlock Plus, CleanLinks and Social Fixer
Mozilla Thunderbird Email Client
Microsoft Office Word 2007
Microsoft Office Excel 2007
Microsoft Office Picture Manager
Calibre (ebook convertor)
PDF Complete
Microsoft Wordpad 5.1.2600.6010 (XP version for backward compatibility)
GwBASIC (archaic, but I've written a lot of useful stuff with it)
Various self-written batch files
Mouse Recorder Pro 2 (and various self-written scripts)
WinRAR 5.61
BatteryAlarmV1.1.0.0
Windows Update Manager 0.9a
Capture2Text
Chronolapse-1.0.8
Snap Timer
Default Programs Editor
RUFUS
Virtual Volumes View Portable (catalogues hard drive contents)

Most of those programs are pretty much part of my life. A few are in need of something better, but mainly I'm happy with them.



Thanks for the video links - I've just watched the first 2 - they do indeed contain useful info and I like the guy's clarity.

Quote:
I will keep using win7 for another five to ten years ahead. Now I have been using dual boot with Linux on my computers for almost two years now and Linux is my primary OS for almost a year now
My dualboot choice is Fedora for desktops and LMDE for my laptops.

Look through his videos and consider about having linux on an old computer to see if it might be a future solution for you.
The advantage of linux is that old computers become like new again, since linux is not as heavy as windows.
Yes, Linux does sound like a very interesting alternative to Windows, the way things are going.



Quote:
But it is a learning curve so start with having a separate computer to start playing around with.

The hardest thing I experienced was to stop thinking windows, windows and again windows.
Once the win-thoughts stopped everything did get a lot easier.
I doubt I'd ever be able to use Linux for everything I do - I've got too much old work that would never load properly in anything but those old Windows programs such as Logic, which itself won't run on anything more recent than WinXP. But there's no reason why I'd have to trash old Windows. I don't fancy creating a dual-boot, but I'm very accustomed to (3rd-party) system backup and restore, so in principle I could load up a system image of any OS I wanted, once it's been created of course. That would be very useful in allowing me to mess with new operating systems without losing access to what I have now. The only old machines I have are unlikely to run anything more recent than WinXP, unless Linux is VERY backward-compatible with hardware, and being such old machines, I don't know how long they'll last.



I'm currently having thoughts about the implications of treating the Web separately from the rest of my computer activities, and having one system / computer for each. But I've written some rather useful (to me) utilities that do things such as very effectively killing tracking on Facebook and downloading YouTube videos very easily and reliably. Unfortunately they were written in various combinations of DOS, macro recorder scripts, and the archaic GwBASIC (weird in this day and age, I know, but GwBASIC is the only language I'm good at ). They took a lot of work to write, and I can't imagine they'd run at all on Linux - they'd likely give some trouble if I even ported them onto a different computer running Win7. I'll rack my brains a little further to see if there's anything else I've overlooked that needs Windows and the Web. It seems that whatever I do I'm set for some tough learning curves, so it's largely a matter of trying to forecast the way forward that will prove the easiest in the long run without sucking me into so much work in the short term that the rest of my life gets no attention.
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3 Weeks Ago   #27
Snick

Win 10 x64, Linux Lite, Win 7 x64, BlackArch, & Kali
 
 

I still don't understand the reluctance of individuals to upgrade to Windows 10?
I participated in the Windows 10 Insider Fast Ring Beta testers during its development.
I'm running Win10 Home now, no issues.
Have dual boot Win7 Win10

Snick
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3 Weeks Ago   #28
Golden
Microsoft MVP

Windows 10 Pro x64 ; Xubuntu x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ToughDiamond View Post
I didn't know routers could be so vulnerable in their default state, or that they could be configured.
If I may add to SiW's advice : use a mixture of numeric, alphanumeric and special characters for the router password. A 16+ character password is advised.

If you use wireless, ensure you are using WPA2 and NOT WEP protocol. There will be a setting for that in the router.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
3 Weeks Ago   #29
Bree

Windows 7 Home Premium x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ToughDiamond View Post
...Here's a list of the programs I currently use:
Using Windows XP Mode (Windows Virtual PC) in Windows 7 32-bit:
XP Mode will not install in W10, but in W10 Pro you can import it and run it as a Hyper-V VM.
Import Windows XP Mode from Windows 7 to Windows 10 | Tutorials


Quote:
VLC Portable
VLC is available for Linux.


Quote:
Windows DVD Maker
The Media Centre, of which DVD Maker is a part, has been removed in W10. DVD Styler is a good (if not better) replacement. I use the Portable Apps version.
DVDStyler Portable (DVD menu creator) | PortableApps.com

Quote:
Microsoft Office Word 2007
Microsoft Office Excel 2007
LibreOffice is quite a good multi-platform substitute.

Quote:
I doubt I'd ever be able to use Linux for everything I do - I've got too much old work that would never load properly in anything but those old Windows programs...
You could always run a Windows VM under Linux for those programs you cannot do without.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
3 Weeks Ago   #30
Marie SWE

2xWin8.1, 1xWin7HomeX64, 2xWin7Prox64, 1xWin2008R2server. 1xXP Pro, 1xWin 2k, 1x98SE,3.11 LinuxLMDE3
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Snick View Post
I still don't understand the reluctance of individuals to upgrade to Windows 10?
I participated in the Windows 10 Insider Fast Ring Beta testers during its development.
I'm running Win10 Home now, no issues.
Have dual boot Win7 Win10

Snick
It's simple. If you do not like company policies on data collection, you have to find alternatives.
Example, you may not like that the government listens to you, collect data via the NSA and so on. But you think it's okay for companies to do the same thing and sell the information to third parties. Isn't that contradictory?

So to get companies to stop doing stupid things, you have to boycott their products.
Either they have to change so the customers come back or they will go bankrupt. We consumers has the power if we all go together.
So those who continue using their products is the same as saying that it is okay for them to continue to do what they do.

So complaining but continuing to use the product will never bring a change. It will only get worse
Look at Microsoft's development in telemetry in Vista and forward. Facebook development of data collection the last 10 years. Google and so on.

Do you like this trend? Look at how China has introduced various credit system of the residents behavior is mapped and scored and scoring them based on that.... Is that how we want it all over the world.
Freedom of Speech.. will be gone
Right of search and seizure regulated.. will be gone. google and microsoft will know it all through to data collection from IP-security cameras with microphones, smartphones, computers and IoT and sells it to third parties as companies, private individuals (criminals) who have the money to buy the information, NSA, foreign states and so on
Everything people say that is politically negative will give minus points in the scoring system.
Nice future huh?

Yes, I know I'm exaggerating a lot now, but if it can happen in China, so why can't it happen in more places in the world.
Yes, it's very, very unlikely but not totally impossible. (big foil hat on this post. ha ha)
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 Going from 32-bit Win7 to 64-bit Win7




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