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Windows 7: Should I buy windows 7?

18 Sep 2010   #11
Product FRED

Windows 7 Enterprise 64-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by thehappyman View Post
Does your Linux OS support 64 bit addressing ???? Support the Solid State Drive TRIM operation ?????

How many competitive commercially available Software programs are offered for a Linux System ??? Available at Amazon or Best Buy ??? How many Super Graphics Games for high end SLI/Crossfire video cards ???? How many super duper benchmarking programs ??? and for designers, Photoshop maybe ???

Win 7 does

It's All in the eyes of the beholder..........
Your "system" has served you well TuxKernal !!!!!!!!
Three Cheers
It's not a question of which is better than the other; I have OS X, Ubuntu, and Windows 7 on my desktop. The former two I find are better for everyday use because they are far better at memory management; ie one misbehaving application will not affect other running applications. Also, they have totally different systems for managing running processes. And you can run most Windows applications (including Valve games like Half-Life 2 and programs like Internet Explorer) using WINE, which is not an emulator, but a compatibility layer (WINE stands for WINE IS NOT [AN] EMULATOR). All of those things you mentioned are available on Linux. Open Source software provides the same or better equivalents to closed-source software. And a lot of them are also available on Windows (Pidgin, GIMP).


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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18 Sep 2010   #12
thehappyman

Win 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Product FRED View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by thehappyman View Post
Does your Linux OS support 64 bit addressing ???? Support the Solid State Drive TRIM operation ?????

How many competitive commercially available Software programs are offered for a Linux System ??? Available at Amazon or Best Buy ??? How many Super Graphics Games for high end SLI/Crossfire video cards ???? How many super duper benchmarking programs ??? and for designers, Photoshop maybe ???

Win 7 does

It's All in the eyes of the beholder..........
Your "system" has served you well TuxKernal !!!!!!!!
Three Cheers
It's not a question of which is better than the other; I have OS X, Ubuntu, and Windows 7 on my desktop. The former two I find are better for everyday use because they are far better at memory management; ie one misbehaving application will not affect other running applications. Also, they have totally different systems for managing running processes. And you can run most Windows applications (including Valve games like Half-Life 2 and programs like Internet Explorer) using WINE, which is not an emulator, but a compatibility layer (WINE stands for WINE IS NOT [AN] EMULATOR). All of those things you mentioned are available on Linux. Open Source software provides the same or better equivalents to closed-source software. And a lot of them are also available on Windows (Pidgin, GIMP).
Fun to have all three !!!!!!!
You have a big point.

But Gimp is no Photoshop........
My System SpecsSystem Spec
18 Sep 2010   #13
madtownidiot

 

I've been using linux and windows 7 in a dual boot laptop for about 10 months. I have vBox installed in the 64 bit version of ubuntu ultimate edition with VHDs of 32 and 64 bit window xp, vista and windows 7 mainly because that allows me to provide remote assistance to almost anyone without having to reboot to a different OS. I started with windows 7 ultimate, but recently downgraded to 7 professional..

Point blank.. for recreational computer use and most office related work windows 7 is overall the best operating system I've ever seen, but I would highly recommend keeping linux because there are some things that simply work faster.. mainly because ext4 is a more efficient file system than NTFS and 64 bit linux requires less than half the system resources of windows 7 x64. And the built in multiple desktops in Ubuntu are a feature you would have to pay for in windows. Fortunately it's much easier to configure a dual boot system with linux and windows than it is with any two versions of windows. Give it a try. It's worth the money
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18 Sep 2010   #14
TuxKernel

Fedora 13, Ubuntu 10.04, Debian 5.0, Minix 3, Windows Xp
 
 

[QUOTE=Product FRED;966104]
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by thehappyman View Post
Does your Linux OS support 64 bit addressing ???? Support the Solid State Drive TRIM operation ?????

How many competitive commercially available Software programs are offered for a Linux System ??? Available at Amazon or Best Buy ??? How many Super Graphics Games for high end SLI/Crossfire video cards ???? How many super duper benchmarking programs ??? and for designers, Photoshop maybe ???
I dont know if you are getting me wrong i have not said anything that windows seven does not have the features. I just accustomed to unix enviroment thats all.

and why do u think linux does not have 64 bit OS? i'm runnig 64 bit linux machines.

I dont understand what do you actually mean by commercially available. Just something is commercially available does not mean it will suit my needs. Take microsoft office for example. I have to prepare a lot of assignments and reports and i have also submitted two papers in regional IEEE journal(one of them was published, it was on Don knuth MMIX RISC Architechture), and i have never used MS office. Although currently i dont have MS Office. But one time i was away from home and i had a assignment pending. So i started MSoffice in one of my friends machine. But quickly i got frustrated because the package seems bloated to me, too much mouse involvement needed to do simple stuff. and it was nightmare for me to write mathmatical equations there. It took me 5 minutes to write a double integral with exponential functions. and the typefaces of the equations are frustrating. I generally use LATEX to prepare documents where equatios can be written in seconds and referencing them does not involve provoking multiple windows or searching for the right radio button. and as i use latex i can use vim for text editing so i can use all the intellegent features it comes with and all the powerful regular expressions for manipulating texts. i always was admired by my professors for the quality of the typsets i get from LATEX. Now i'm not saying i MS office is bad. And i do get it that for general purpose usage like writing small letters , msoffice is more than enough. but for my purposes its useless. So it all boils down to what i need from a perticular software package.

and i'm not a graphic designer so i dont worry about what graphics designer would do. I'm a programmer so i worry about what development tools available for me. besides for fun i use gimp and blender and they seems easy and intuitive for me. and i have seen graphics created using them by others which is quiet wonderful.

And i don like games that much. I do play some small puzzles in computers. my younger brother has a xbox360 and always he tried to make a game lover. but i always loose interest in games because it seems to me behind all these flashy graphics, most of the games are just about hand eye co ordination.again nothing against games , its just my personal choice.

Apart from all of these,
i started this thread because i wanted to know wheather windows 7 will suit me....not because as if i think windows in inferior. so if someone thinks that i'm trying to make an argument aginst windows 7 generally then its just their responsibility for misinterpreting my intensions.
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18 Sep 2010   #15
TuxKernel

Fedora 13, Ubuntu 10.04, Debian 5.0, Minix 3, Windows Xp
 
 

Thanks for the advice , i studied a little about power shell . it seems better then cmd prompt.

In my country there is no official microsoft program for giving discount to students. so i will just buy one which costs less. since i just need the development tools i think its a good choice to buy a stripped down version.

and i dont like dual booting. as my cpu supports Intel VT-x and VT-d i think vmware is enough. and my other linux and unix OS runs smoothly in vmware with the desktop compositing enabled.

One of my machine is core i5 750 3.2GHZ and 4 GB Ram. so i think its enough to virtualize windows 7.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
19 Sep 2010   #16
madtownidiot

 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by thehappyman View Post
Does your Linux OS support 64 bit addressing ???? Support the Solid State Drive TRIM operation ?????

How many competitive commercially available Software programs are offered for a Linux System ??? Available at Amazon or Best Buy ??? How many Super Graphics Games for high end SLI/Crossfire video cards ???? How many super duper benchmarking programs ??? and for designers, Photoshop maybe ???

Win 7 does

It's All in the eyes of the beholder..........
Your "system" has served you well TuxKernal !!!!!!!!
Three Cheers
you obviously know nothing about Linux. There are open source, free linux equivalents for nearly every commercially available program for windows, all of which require less system resources than proprietary software because of the lack of excessive source code that serves no purpose except to prevent the user from copying, altering or improving it. Games?? Sure windows has all the good PC games, no doubt about that... but that's what x-boxes and Playstations are for. SSD support and 64 bit addressing? The lucid distro of ubuntu x64 installs from a flash drive to the average system with a SSD in less than 10 minutes. All non proprietary hardware in nearly every commercially available pc or laptop usually works immediately on the very first boot... In other words, with ubuntu and at least a ten other Linux variations based on the Debian kernel you can boot a fully working operating system that has dozens of applications included, with sound, network connectivity, bluetooth, infrared and everything else already working before the OS is installed, in less than 2 minutes, using an ordinary flash drive. Oh.. and by the way, with linux..you don't need an antivirus, antimalware, registry cleaners, or defragmenters to keep it running.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
19 Sep 2010   #17
wysiwyg

Vista Ultimate 32 bit, Win 7 Pro 32 bit, Win 7 Pro 64 bit
 
 

If Linux is so good, why does it have barely 5% of the market, ???

Moving to 7 is the most sensible thing you can do,
My System SpecsSystem Spec
19 Sep 2010   #18
lorddenis

 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by thehappyman View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Product FRED View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by thehappyman View Post
Does your Linux OS support 64 bit addressing ???? Support the Solid State Drive TRIM operation ?????

How many competitive commercially available Software programs are offered for a Linux System ??? Available at Amazon or Best Buy ??? How many Super Graphics Games for high end SLI/Crossfire video cards ???? How many super duper benchmarking programs ??? and for designers, Photoshop maybe ???

Win 7 does

It's All in the eyes of the beholder..........
Your "system" has served you well TuxKernal !!!!!!!!
Three Cheers
It's not a question of which is better than the other; I have OS X, Ubuntu, and Windows 7 on my desktop. The former two I find are better for everyday use because they are far better at memory management; ie one misbehaving application will not affect other running applications. Also, they have totally different systems for managing running processes. And you can run most Windows applications (including Valve games like Half-Life 2 and programs like Internet Explorer) using WINE, which is not an emulator, but a compatibility layer (WINE stands for WINE IS NOT [AN] EMULATOR). All of those things you mentioned are available on Linux. Open Source software provides the same or better equivalents to closed-source software. And a lot of them are also available on Windows (Pidgin, GIMP).
Fun to have all three !!!!!!!
You have a big point.

But Gimp is no Photoshop........
i dont know if this is true but somewhere i read that Photoshop cs5 portable works on ubunto 10.04 with wine.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by wysiwyg View Post
If Linux is so good, why does it have barely 5% of the market, ???

Moving to 7 is the most sensible thing you can do,
mostly because the new games arent working on it.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
19 Sep 2010   #19
bobtran

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by wysiwyg View Post
If Linux is so good, why does it have barely 5% of the market, ???

Moving to 7 is the most sensible thing you can do,
Because it is not offered to the average mom and pop looking to buy a new computer. Linux is that club that you have to know about before you buy a pc.

Ubunt, Redhat and Suse are slowly changing this however and with Android being on more and more phones, Apads, etc you can count on it gaining popularity. The current crop of Linux OS's are quite capable of working for most average home users needs.

In answer to the original question, yes I think that you would find Windows 7 a good fit going forward although you should probably keep those other OS skills current also. Flexibility is the way to stay employable, busy and continuing to make a good income.
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19 Sep 2010   #20
Keiichi25

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 and Home Premium x64
 
 

Ok... First... Let's not let this degrade into a personal war... That doesn't serve the OP or the rest of us any good.

Second, the reason Linux isn't 'popular' is mostly it is not 'advertised' like Windows and Mac OSX is. While there is Linux equivalent software out there for Windows and Mac OSX, again, most of that software isn't widely advertised to the general public.

Most people who are familiar with Linux are also Tech people, NOT the average user. At the same time, majority of the interesting games are made for Windows for a desktop computer. Majority of businesses are also leaning towards Windows due to the ease of programming that comes with the Visual Studio component which, again, leans towards Windows based systems.

While there are Linux based companies, the simple fact is, not many groups do PHP, or Ruby or MySQL or SQL in general.

Now this is not to say that Linux is dead, far from it. The problem is mostly implementation and how many companies are willing to go with that methodology, how many schools or technical focus with that? Again, not many. Again, part of it has to do with the tools, which leans towards Visual Studio.

Now I state this not because I believe Windows is Superior, simply explaining why I believe Linux hasn't been 'widely used'. As someone stated, no one bothered with sending out mom and pop computers with Linux. And not many people will go with Linux initially as they will want something simple which Windows and Mac OS X will be.

Lastly, Mac OS X is built on a Linux Core, but you can't exactly use programs written for Mac, to my knowledge, on Linux systems without some tweaking, nor can you use some Linux based programs on OS X without tweaking as well. And to be honest, not many people MESS with the Linux side of the Mac OS X either, only, again, people familiar with computers on a Computer Science Degree level.

Now, can we all just drop this silly monkey chest thumping about Linux and Windows?
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 Should I buy windows 7?




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