Random shutdowns. No warning. No BSOD. Passes all tests.

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  1. Posts : 32
    Windows 7
       #1

    Random shutdowns. No warning. No BSOD. Passes all tests.


    Specs:
    CPU: i7 2600k
    ATI 6950 x2
    Muskin 8GB
    2 1TB HDD
    1 64GB SSD
    4 250GB HDD
    Antec 1200 Case
    MSI MCII MB

    Problem:
    Computer shuts down without warning. No BSOD. No error messages (apart from windows did not successfully shutdown).

    Duration:
    Has been going on for about a year.

    Fix attempts:
    1. Thought my old PSU was not enough (850W) so upgraded (1000W) - Problem Persists
    2. Ran Prime95 24 hours - Passes
    3. Ran MemTest+64 12 hours - Passes
    4. Ran MSI Kumbustor 5 hours - Passes

    Notes:
    Happens mostly during gaming, but lately has started while surfing the web.
    Currently running one 6950 (Seems to be more stable).
    Times between shutdowns range anywhere from a couple days to a couple minutes.
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 10,796
    Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bits 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
       #2

    shutdown, so you see "windows shutting down" or something alike? I don't think so. I think it crashes. To disable autoreboot on crash:

    Here's How:

    1. Click on the Start button and then on Control Panel.
      Tip: In a hurry? Type system in the search box after clicking Start. Choose System under the Control Panel heading in the list of results and then skip to Step 4.
    2. Click on the System and Security link.
      Note: If you're viewing the Small icons or Large icons view of Control Panel, you won't see this link. Simply double-click on the System icon and proceed to Step 4.
    3. Click on the System link.
    4. In the task pane on the left, click the Advanced system settings link.
    5. Locate the Startup and Recovery section near the bottom of the window and click on the Settings button.
    6. In the Startup and Recovery window, locate and uncheck the check box next to Automatically restart.
    7. Click OK in the Startup and Recovery window.
    8. Click OK in the System Properties window.
    9. You can now close the System window.
    10. From now on, when a problem causes a BSOD or another major error that halts the system, Windows 7 will not force a reboot. You'll have to reboot manually when an error appears.
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 32
    Windows 7
    Thread Starter
       #3

    Kaktussoft said:
    shutdown, so you see "windows shutting down" or something alike? I don't think so. I think it crashes. To disable autoreboot on crash:
    Sorry if I wasn't clear. When I wrote shutdown, I mean just shuts itself off. It does not show that "windows shutting down". Just power cuts off, everything stops, and then it reboots itself.

    But I will try your post.

    Quick question: If I set automatic reboot off in windows and it shuts itself off again, but still automatically reboots, would this mean that it is not a windows related issue?
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 10,796
    Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bits 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
       #4

    king geedorah said:
    Kaktussoft said:
    shutdown, so you see "windows shutting down" or something alike? I don't think so. I think it crashes. To disable autoreboot on crash:
    Sorry if I wasn't clear. When I wrote shutdown, I mean just shuts itself off. It does not show that "windows shutting down". Just power cuts off, everything stops, and then it reboots itself.

    But I will try your post.

    Quick question: If I set automatic reboot off in windows and it shuts itself off again, but still automatically reboots, would this mean that it is not a windows related issue?
    So it's actually a crash... most likely showing a BSOD for a split second and reboots. Do my trick so don't let it reboot on crash so you can see BSOD error message.

    If no error message at all.... it's the hardware itself that does it (due to getting too hot[?]). But I think it doesn't boot automatically then(?)
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 32
    Windows 7
    Thread Starter
       #5

    Sorry if I wasn't clear. When I wrote shutdown, I mean just shuts itself off. It does not show that "windows shutting down". Just power cuts off, everything stops, and then it reboots itself.

    But I will try your post.

    Quick question: If I set automatic reboot off in windows and it shuts itself off again, but still automatically reboots, would this mean that it is not a windows related issue?
    So it's actually a crash... most likely showing a BSOD for a split second and reboots. Do my trick so don't let it reboot on crash so you can see BSOD error message.

    If no error message at all.... it's the hardware itself that does it (due to getting too hot[?]). But I think it doesn't boot automatically then(?)
    No BSOD at all. It happens when I am on the computer focusing on it, and I have never seen a BSOD. I will try your trick, and when it happens again, if there is a BSOD, I will update the OP.

    And I doubt its a heat problem, Antec 1200 is a pretty fan heavy case, and all my fans are functioning properly, and I never utilize above 30% with normal gaming (CPU wise) and never above 85C (GPU wise).
      My Computer

  6.    #6

    That seems hot. I'd check the maximum heat specs for your card and CPU to compare with temps kept in System tray using Core Temp.

    Otherwise work through these Troubleshooting Steps for Windows 7 to go over your install thoroughy.

    If you can run a boot disk like Peppermint3 - Create Live CD/DVD/USB To Use For Emergency Backup
    then you'll be able to eliminate the OS as cause since it cuts out the HD - in fact I'd unplug it to be sure.



    CPU Temperatures
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 32
    Windows 7
    Thread Starter
       #7

    gregrocker said:
    That seems hot. I'd check the maximum heat specs for your card and CPU to compare with temps kept in System tray using Core Temp.

    Otherwise work through these Troubleshooting Steps for Windows 7 to go over your install thoroughy.

    If you can run a boot disk like Peppermint3 - Create Live CD/DVD/USB To Use For Emergency Backup
    then you'll be able to eliminate the OS as cause since it cuts out the HD - in fact I'd unplug it to be sure.

    CPU Temperatures
    Thank you for your reply.

    The CPU never gets as hot as 85C. I use a fan profile in BIOS as well as emergency thermal notification (also in BIOS) should my CPU get hot.

    As for my GPU is use MSI afterburner with a fan profile I made, to keep the maximum temperature around 80-85C for 100% load, which is perfectly safe for a GPU.

    I will go through the link you posted about troubleshooting steps and let you know what happens!

    And as for the LiveCD. The only problem is that I don't know when it could happen and I can't replicate it. So I wouldn't know if the LiveCD would solve the problem or if the problem never happened on the LiveCD. (Hope that came out clear)
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 59
    Windows 7 ultimate 64 bit
       #8

    Is the power supply properly rated? like bronze 80 plus / silver 80 plus? sometimes the power supply cant handle the ampage on the rails and it just crashes the pc with no warning. if it is incorrectly rated it wont matter if its a 800 or 1000w. What brand?

    I had an issue a few years back with any high power game or intensive computer use that would shut my pc down like someone had reefed out the power cord and then it would turn itself back on. turns out I needed a higher quality power supply
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 32
    Windows 7
    Thread Starter
       #9

    Johnthefast said:
    Is the power supply properly rated? like bronze 80 plus / silver 80 plus? sometimes the power supply cant handle the ampage on the rails and it just crashes the pc with no warning. if it is incorrectly rated it wont matter if its a 800 or 1000w. What brand?

    I had an issue a few years back with any high power game or intensive computer use that would shut my pc down like someone had reefed out the power cord and then it would turn itself back on. turns out I needed a higher quality power supply
    I used to have an antec 850W PSU. I used it for about 1.5 years, up till recently when the shutoffs started becoming more frequent. I thought maybe it could be the PSU, because according to some PSU calculators I could pull around 900W under 100% load from everything. So I purchased OCZ Fatality 1000W GOLD PLUS PSU about 2 months ago. But the problems still persist.
      My Computer


  10. Posts : 32
    Windows 7
    Thread Starter
       #10

    Kaktussoft said:
    shutdown, so you see "windows shutting down" or something alike? I don't think so. I think it crashes. To disable autoreboot on crash:

    Here's How:

    1. Click on the Start button and then on Control Panel.
      Tip: In a hurry? Type system in the search box after clicking Start. Choose System under the Control Panel heading in the list of results and then skip to Step 4.
    2. Click on the System and Security link.
      Note: If you're viewing the Small icons or Large icons view of Control Panel, you won't see this link. Simply double-click on the System icon and proceed to Step 4.
    3. Click on the System link.
    4. In the task pane on the left, click the Advanced system settings link.
    5. Locate the Startup and Recovery section near the bottom of the window and click on the Settings button.
    6. In the Startup and Recovery window, locate and uncheck the check box next to Automatically restart.
    7. Click OK in the Startup and Recovery window.
    8. Click OK in the System Properties window.
    9. You can now close the System window.
    10. From now on, when a problem causes a BSOD or another major error that halts the system, Windows 7 will not force a reboot. You'll have to reboot manually when an error appears.
    I just got home and went through my settings, and the box was already unchecked.

    gregrocker said:
    That seems hot. I'd check the maximum heat specs for your card and CPU to compare with temps kept in System tray using Core Temp.

    Otherwise work through these Troubleshooting Steps for Windows 7 to go over your install thoroughy.

    If you can run a boot disk like Peppermint3 - Create Live CD/DVD/USB To Use For Emergency Backup
    then you'll be able to eliminate the OS as cause since it cuts out the HD - in fact I'd unplug it to be sure.

    CPU Temperatures
    I just got home and went through the steps you provided in the Troubleshooting Steps for Windows 7, and I had already attempted all of those before posting this thread.

    Thank you guys for your help btw, I really appreciate it.
      My Computer


 
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