Libraries - Include a Network Folder

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    Libraries - Include a Network Folder

    Libraries - Include a Network Folder

    How to Include a Network Drive or Folder in a Library in Windows 7 and Windows 8
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    Designer Media Ltd


    How to Include a Network Drive or Folder in a Library in Windows 7 and Windows 8

       Information
    By default, Windows 7 and Windows 8 does not allow you to include network drives or folders in a library. This is because folders must be indexed first in order to be added to a library, and network drives cannot be indexed unless they are synchronized.

    This tutorial will show you how to include network drives or folders in a library in Windows 7 and Windows 8.

       Tip
    The full path to the hidden Libraries folder is below.

    C:\Users\(User-Name)\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Libraries

    OR

    %AppData%\Microsoft\Windows\Libraries






    OPTION ONE

    Synchronize the Network Folder or Drive


    WARNING: The disadvantage of this method is that it actually copies (syncs) all network files locally so that they are available offline. It actually makes networking useless since you have to bring everything on your PC. For those not interested for this approach, please use method 2.
    1. Right click on the network folder or network drive you wish to include to a library (or create a new one for it) and select "Always Available Offline". A synching process will start, synchronizing your network folder.


    2. Now you can add it to a library in Windows 7 or Windows 8.



    OPTION TWO

    Using mklink Command


    NOTE: This open is good if you don't want to make the folder available offline using OPTION ONE above because you don't want to keep the folder contents on your PC. Using this option will make searching, sorting, and filtering in the whole library slow. For best results, it's recommended to create a new library for the network folder alone.
    1. Create a new folder (ex: c:\shares) on your hard drive.

    2. Create a new subfolder (ex: c:\shares\pictures) in the above folder.

    3. Include this folder (ex: c:\shares\pictures) to a library.

    4. Delete the folder (ex: c:\shares\pictures), but do not remove it from the library.

    5. Use mklink in an elevated command prompt to make a symbolic link. Name the link the same as the folder you created above. i.e -
    mklink /d "LINK" "TARGET"

    mklink /d "c:\shares\pictures" \\Server\Network Folder
    6. Done. Now you have a non-indexed network path as a library.
    Limneos








  1. Posts : 1
    Windows 7
       #1

    This works


    There's a free video of how to do this here: http://www.winstructor.com/news/22/W...-Video%29.html

    I tried it and it works great. The other option is to use the favorites feature above where the libraries are. Glad I found this out as I was not prepared to index my drive with like 20Gb of photos on it just to add it to a library.

    Very good post.
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 1
    Win 7
       #2

    There is another skywa.. eh. Library insert


    Also try this:
    1. make the wanted folder available off-line (if you got the space to do that)
    2. link the off line folder to the library.
    3. undo off-line properties for the folder.
    Done!
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 32
    Windows 7
       #3

    Can someone help me out with this
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 14
    Windows 7
       #4

    Unfortunately, the symbolic link option will cause windows 7 in-built backup to fail. This happens when the library containing the symlink is included in the backup procedure.

    See here.

    https://www.sevenforums.com/performan...tml#post235418

    Windows 7 should somehow check for symlinks and not try to back them up.
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 32
    Windows 7
       #5

    Im stuck on 3 in method 2 can someone ehlp me
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 70,219
    64-bit Windows 10 Pro
       #6

    Hello Converseallstar,

    I believe you would want to add the folder to the library in that step. :)

    Hope this helps,
    Shawn
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 34
    Windows 7
       #7

    It looks as though the "libraries" function is a showstopper, no corporate will want to go through all that hassle. The user education factor alone is a showstopper for corporates.
    From my preliminary look at Windows 7, it seems to be similar to Vista, except that it crashes apps like explorer.exe far more easily.
    If this is RC, God help us! It looks as though we are going to have to wait until SP2 for anything that works.

    Ref my last comment - adding a networked drive to the library takes so long, users will think it has crashed. Definitely NOT for corporate users and I can't see home users being impressed either.
    Last edited by Brink; 25 Aug 2009 at 10:29. Reason: merged
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 14
    Windows 7
       #8

    PeterM42 said:
    Ref my last comment - adding a networked drive to the library takes so long, users will think it has crashed. Definitely NOT for corporate users and I can't see home users being impressed either.
    I am a home user and I am impressed - Cheers
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 1
    Windows 7
       #9

    NAS / libraries


    Its really odd that Microsoft have introduced libraries but without supporting folders on NAS devices. Lots of people use NAS devices now, and they're going to have a pretty poor experience with Windows 7. There seem to be various ways of working round this, but most (like making NAS data available offline) are either inefficient or too complex for the average user. This really needs to be fixed.
      My Computer


 
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