MTU Limit - Test and change your connection's MTU limit

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    MTU Limit - Test and change your connection's MTU limit

    MTU Limit - Test and change your connection's MTU limit

    Tutorial on how to test your MTU limit and change it in command prompt
    Published by
    Designer Media Ltd


    An MTU limit that is set too high can cause fragmented packets and packet loss on your connection. This tutorial will explain how to test if your MTU limit is sending fragmented packets and will explain how to find what value you should be using.

    1) Open an elevated command prompt and type:

    netsh interface ipv4 show subinterfaces

    and hit Enter.

    You should get a list of all your network adapters installed on your PC. The MTU value is listed on the left.

    MTU Limit - Test and change your connection's MTU limit-cmd1.png

    All PPP connections (Point-to-Point Protocol) have a default MTU size of 1500 bytes and VPN connections have a defualt size of 1400. 28 bytes of this number is reserved for IP/ICMP overhead, so the effective MTU size here is 1472 (1500-28).

    To work out if this MTU is too high for your connection, you need to ping with this amount of bytes. The best way to start is start with the default MTU and work your way down.

    2) In an elevated command prompt, type the following to ping with an MTU size

    ping google.com -f -l 1472

    The -f marks packets that should not be fragmented in the ping. -l 1472 sets the size of the packet.

    MTU Limit - Test and change your connection's MTU limit-cmd2.png

    If you get successful replies, then your current MTU is fine for your connection. If you receive error messages like in the above image, then your packets are getting fragmented.

    Keep trying to ping until you get 4 successful replies. Keep decreasing the MTU by 10, so if 1472 fails, try 1462.

    You shouldn't go below 1400.

    When you find a value that is successful, start to increase that value by 1, so if 1462 is successful, for example, try again with 1463 etc until you get errors again.

    3) When you find a successful value, you can then set a new MTU limit with this value.

    You will need to add 28 back on to the value for IP/ICMP overheads, so if 1462 is successful, then 1490 is your MTU limit.

    To set your new limit, in an elevated command prompt use the following command

    For a wired connection use:

    netsh interface ipv4 set subinterface "Local Area Connection" mtu=1490 store=persistent

    (You can change the interface name to whatever you're using. If you're connected via "Local Area Connection 2" then use this instead and so on)

    For a wireless connection use:

    netsh interface ipv4 set subinterface "Wireless Network Connection" mtu=1490 store=persistent

    Change the MTU value to whatever value you found yourself. Remember you need to add 28 on to the value you were using in your pings. So if you were using a value of 1460 to ping, add 28 on, and the MTU value to set in the above commands will be 1488.

    Simply hit Enter and the MTU value will be set.

    Restart your PC for the changes to be effective.

    If your router also has an MTU value that can be set, such as Netgear routers can have an MTU value set in the WAN settings, then you can add your value here as well.

    I've done these steps myself, and it did infact help connections in some online games where I was getting packet loss. After doing these, I now get 0% packet loss. Web browsing is also a lot smoother on my wireless network with this tweak.



  1. NoN
    Posts : 4,167
    Windows 7 Professional SP1 - x64 [Non-UEFI Boot]
       #1

    Very interresting...i mean the command...I done the ping and got the value 1464 then add 28 and got the original value i did settle since i've got XP = 1492...(the normal setting!)

    Thank you it had confirm my first ping parameter i'd set online, few years ago with an optimizer tool.

    What's about Default TTL in Windows 7... 64 or 128 in decimal?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails MTU Limit - Test and change your connection's MTU limit-capture.png  
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 8,399
    ultimate 64 sp1
       #2

    thanks Everlong,

    tried it and 1462\1490 was my magic number.

    i wonder if this will improve my kdr in bf2bc? :)

    now why can't the OS do this itself?
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 3,324
    Windows 8.1 Pro x64
    Thread Starter
       #3

    NoN said:
    Very interresting...i mean the command...I done the ping and got the value 1464 then add 28 and got the original value i did settle since i've got XP = 1492...(the normal setting!)

    Thank you it had confirm my first ping parameter i'd set online, few years ago with an optimizer tool.

    What's about Default TTL in Windows 7... 64 or 128 in decimal?
    You don't need to change the TTL. That's the Time To Live and sets how long it takes a connection to timeout, in this case the ping. If you increase it then it takes longer to time out, and quicker to time out if you lower it.


    mickey megabyte said:
    thanks Everlong,

    tried it and 1462\1490 was my magic number.

    i wonder if this will improve my kdr in bf2bc? :)

    now why can't the OS do this itself?
    I haven't tried BC2 since setting mine, but CSS certainly played smoother as well. Don't know why Windows sets such a high value though.
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 1,020
    Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit
       #4

    Good post Everlong. Nice work.
      My Computer


  5. NoN
    Posts : 4,167
    Windows 7 Professional SP1 - x64 [Non-UEFI Boot]
       #5

    [QUOTE=Everlong;818244]
    NoN said:
    Very interresting...i mean the command...I done the ping and got the value 1464 then add 28 and got the original value i did settle since i've got XP = 1492...(the normal setting!)

    Thank you it had confirm my first ping parameter i'd set online, few years ago with an optimizer tool.

    What's about Default TTL in Windows 7... 64 or 128 in decimal?
    You don't need to change the TTL. That's the Time To Live and sets how long it takes a connection to timeout, in this case the ping. If you increase it then it takes longer to time out, and quicker to time out if you lower it.
    Humm, well it is always on 64 decimal on my computers. tried 128 on 7 didn't much changes. Got that TCP Optimizer and created a .reg with it so i wouldn't bother recreate each time...so that why it is always set. Thanks anyway!
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 3,324
    Windows 8.1 Pro x64
    Thread Starter
       #6

    TimStitt said:
    Good post Everlong. Nice work.
    Thanks :)
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 5,642
    Windows 10 Pro (x64)
       #7

    Everlong said:
    ...Don't know why Windows sets such a high value though.
    a MTU of 1500 is the standard for Ethernet v2. 1492 is for the previous standard. Of course not everyone is using the new standard.
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 1,113
    windows 7 professional & ultimate 64bit laptops
       #8

    so I guess I'm fine
    Last edited by pacinitaly; 02 Sep 2010 at 07:42.
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 3,324
    Windows 8.1 Pro x64
    Thread Starter
       #9

    logicearth said:
    Everlong said:
    ...Don't know why Windows sets such a high value though.
    a MTU of 1500 is the standard for Ethernet v2. 1492 is for the previous standard. Of course not everyone is using the new standard.
    Ahh, I see. Thanks.

    pacinitaly said:
    so I guess I'm fine
    Yea, looks fine with default settings :)
      My Computer


 
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