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Windows 7: Dual Boot Messing Up My Clock ???

31 Dec 2017   #1
BuckSkin

Windows 7 Pro x64
 
 
Dual Boot Messing Up My Clock ???

It took me a bit to figure out the culprit in this situation, but I now have the suspect list narrowed down to one.

I recently installed Linux ZorinOS in dual-boot configuration on one of our machines; both Windows 7 Pro and ZorinOS reside on the same HDD.

I got to noticing that the clock in Windows was mysteriously and very randomly jumping ahead six hours; six hours just happens to be my offset from Greenwich Mean Time, Greenwich being six hours ahead of me.

I finally realized that this was happening after I would boot to Linux and then boot back into Windows.

Curiously, it does not affect the time in ZorinOS; it is always correct.

As much research as I did before I jumped into the Linux boat, I never read of this happening; am I the only one to ever experience this ?

Is there a cure ?

Thanks for reading and Happy Holidays, Merry Christmas, and Happy New Year !


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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31 Dec 2017   #2
FreeBooter

Windows 10 Pro x64
 
 

There is no way Linux or any other dual booted operating systems can alter each other clock that is been displayed this is a weird issue have a go at suggestions at below website link.

How to Fix an Incorrect Windows Clock
My System SpecsSystem Spec
31 Dec 2017   #3
BuckSkin

Windows 7 Pro x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by FreeBooter View Post
There is no way Linux or any other dual booted operating systems can alter each other clock that is been displayed this is a weird issue have a go at suggestions at below website link.

How to Fix an Incorrect Windows Clock

I figured my clock problem was going to be a rare situation when I could find no reference to anyone else experiencing it.

Thanks for the link.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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31 Dec 2017   #4
FreeBooter

Windows 10 Pro x64
 
 

I thought issue could be cause by CMOS battery but you said Linux OS not affected with wrong clock been displayed but just in case you should check to see if BIOS have the correct clock.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
31 Dec 2017   #5
ethel

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Hi Buckskin, This previous post may help you to read, as it was someone having the same issue with the

clock using Linux and Windows.


Time is always wrong ( 1 2)
My System SpecsSystem Spec
31 Dec 2017   #6
MSClin

Windows 7 Ultimate 32-bit, Linux Mint 19.0 Xfce 64-bit
 
 

That's because Linux use UTC time and Windows use "Local". The solution would be to make Windows use UTC time or to make Linux use Local time. I prefer to make Linux use Local, because it's just easier.

EDIT: I recommend that if you mostly prefer to use Linux, then make Windows use UTC. If you prefer Windows over Linux, then make Linux use Local. It doesn't really matter what you choose, but that's just my recommendation...

Linux:
1. Edit "UTC=yes" to "UTC=no" in /etc/default/rcS.

Alternative way to make Linux use Local time (working only on newer Linux distributions):
Open Terminal and type this command - timedatectl set-local-rtc 1

Windows:
But if for some reason you want Windows to use UTC... Open Notepad and paste this code:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\TimeZoneInformation]
"RealTimeIsUniversal"=dword:00000001


Then save the file as "WindowsTimeToUTC.reg" and double-click to merge it with the registry. But this is not everything, you should open CMD and disable Windows Time service with this command:

sc config w32time start= disabled

Now you're finished with Windows.

More of this and why it happens you can find here - Time - ArchWiki
My System SpecsSystem Spec
31 Dec 2017   #7
Megahertz07

Windows 7 HP 64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by MSClin View Post
That's because Linux use UTC time and Windows use "Local". The solution would be to make Windows use UTC time or to make Linux use Local time. I prefer to make Linux use Local, because it's just easier.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
31 Dec 2017   #8
FreeBooter

Windows 10 Pro x64
 
 

I think some of us should learn how dual booting works. Computer with multiple operating systems per storage device is a dual-booting computer that stores both Windows and Linux on the same disk drive. In this case a multi-booting boot loader is necessary. Also, the disk must be partitioned to give each operating system its own partition on the disk drive.

Linux does not know how to modify Windows settings no operating systems can modify offline operating systems settings also configurations of one operating system does not applied to any other operating systems which is installed on its own partition.

Linux time configuration cannot affect time configuration of Windows OS if anyone claims it can does not know how operating system works and does not understand how dual booting works.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
31 Dec 2017   #9
Megahertz07

Windows 7 HP 64
 
 

Windows uses local time and update the hardware clock (a.k.a. the Real Time Clock (RTC) or CMOS clock).
Linux uses GMT or UTC time and also update the hardware clock (a.k.a. the Real Time Clock (RTC) or CMOS clock).
Time - ArchWiki

So when you run Linux it will set the hardware clock (RTC) to UTC time and make a correction due to the time zone to show the local time clock.
When you run windows it will load the hardware clock (RTC) that has been set to UTC by Linux. It will show GMT or UTC time until Windows makes the change to local time.

I have just made the MSClin suggestion (post #6) adding utc=no in /etc/default/rcS and it made the magic.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
31 Dec 2017   #10
FreeBooter

Windows 10 Pro x64
 
 

A real-time clock (RTC) is a computer clock (most often in the form of an integrated circuit) that keeps track of the current time. Two clocks are important in Linux: a ‘hardware clock’, also known as RTC, CMOS or BIOS clock. This is the battery backed clock that keeps time even when the system is shut down. The second clock is called the ‘system clock’ or 'kernel clock' and is maintained by the operating system. At boot time, the hardware clock is read and used to set the system clock. From that point onward the system clock is used to track time.

Windows OS does not modify RTC and in Linux OS you will need to use tool called hwclock for accessing one of the hardware clocks directly. You can display the current time, set a hardware clock to a specified time, set a hardware clock to the system time, and set the system time from the hardware clock.

As you can see Linux also does not modify RTC by default only way to do it is to use a tool called hwclock.
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 Dual Boot Messing Up My Clock ???




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