Thoughts on a solid state drive?

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  1. Posts : 165
    Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit
       #1

    Thoughts on a solid state drive?


    Are they worth getting? Don't they break faster then the classic drive? Also they cost alot to get the same storage capacity as a normal drive?
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  2. Posts : 1,872
    Windows 10 Pro x64, Windows 8.1 Pro x64, Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1,
       #2

    SSD drives don't break faster than mechanical drives, in fact, since there are no mechanical parts, they should be more reliable.
    They do cost more than mechanical drives but the prices have come down since they were first introduced.

    Are they worth it? I personally think they are for the operating system and programs. They increase the performance of the computer.

    I use mechanical drives for storing data.
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  3. Posts : 12,012
    Windows 7 Home Premium SP1, 64-bit
       #3

    For most people in most circumstances, an SSD is probably the biggest performance increase you can make for under $100.

    You can still keep your spinning drive for all of your data, assuming your PC has the internal space for 2 drives. It should. Put Windows and most or all applications on the SSD, and your data on the spinning drive.

    An 80 or 120 GB SSD is large enough for most users. Cost for that is well under $100 for good brands---Samsung, Crucial, Intel.

    SSDs often come with software to facilitate moving Windows from the spinning drive to the SSD, but you can certainly use other third-party applications for that purpose--or do a clean install if you prefer.

    Faster boot times, faster application opening, lower noise, lower electricity usage, less heat, and a generally "snappier" system. Reliability probably greater as well.
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  4. Posts : 9,612
    Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
       #4

    SSDs are still too expensive for mass data storage and, unless moving massive amounts of data at once, very little performance gain will be realized. However, when used for the OS and programs only, the performance gain is phenomenal, with the greatest improvement being in the speed up of boot times and program loading. As ignatzsonic stated, an SSD is the single best upgrade one can make to a computer (increasing RAM in a computer without enough in the first place is the next best). While good SSDs large enough for a boot drive (a drive with just the OS and programs on it) can be had for under $100, I recommend shelling out a bit more for a 128GB Samsung 840 Pro. With the 850 Pro coming out later this month, the prices on the 840 Pro should plummet so watch for sales.

    Now, on a laptop with room for only one drive that doesn't get heavy use, a larger SSD is needed. For that, I would suggest one of the 840 EVOs. Their performance is pretty much as good as the Pros but cost less. While theoretical write life of the EVOs is less than that of the Pros, tests have shown the EVOs will probably outlive any machine they get put into.
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  5. Posts : 548
    Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
       #5

    Unless you specifically need an SSD for its inherent characteristics (lack of moving parts, resistant to physical shock, fast access times, etc.) owing to its design compared to HDDs, SSDs are still largely a luxury item. HDDs are still king when it comes to "bytes per buck".

    I've also used computers with SSDs and they aren't nearly as fast as most people make them out to be. Yes, SSDs allow for blazing boot times and whatnot, but unless you require such performances for things such as professional requirements (eg: video recording) an HDD will serve most average users perfectly fine.

    I will say though that with laptops, SSDs have more argument in becoming a neccesity rather than a luxury. Most laptops are handled roughly and a HDD is weak to physical shock and stress due to its design, something that SSDs are almost impervious to.
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  6. Posts : 25,847
    Windows 10 Pro. 64/ version 1709 Windows 7 Pro/64
       #6

    How much money you are willing to spend is not my concern. It's your money.
    To me a quality brand name ssd is a wise buy.
    I would not own a PC with out a ssd.
    Once you use one you will want more.
    The two brands I use without any problems are Intel and Samsung.

    Two things you must do with a ssd.
    1. Make sure defrag is tunned off
    2. Use it and enjoy.
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  7. Posts : 9,612
    Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
       #7

    King Arthur said:
    Unless you specifically need an SSD for its inherent characteristics (lack of moving parts, resistant to physical shock, fast access times, etc.) owing to its design compared to HDDs, SSDs are still largely a luxury item. HDDs are still king when it comes to "bytes per buck".

    I've also used computers with SSDs and they aren't nearly as fast as most people make them out to be. Yes, SSDs allow for blazing boot times and whatnot, but unless you require such performances for things such as professional requirements (eg: video recording) an HDD will serve most average users perfectly fine.

    I will say though that with laptops, SSDs have more argument in becoming a neccesity rather than a luxury. Most laptops are handled roughly and a HDD is weak to physical shock and stress due to its design, something that SSDs are almost impervious to.
    You must be using some pretty crappy SSDs, then, or they weren't set up properly because that definitely hasn't been my experience. My desktop computer runs 24/7 and I reboot only once a week or so and I still wouldn't have a computer without an SSD. Besides faster boot times, programs start faster and, if programs have to access modules frequently, they do so faster.

    I agree that mass data storage is best done on HDDs. SSDs are still too expensive for data storage and would be noticeably faster only when moving massive amounts of data at once (which most of us do not).

    I also agree that SSDs in laptops are becoming more a necessity than a luxury but not for the reasons you gave. I've yet to have a HDD fail in a laptop due to rough handling. However, I won't have one without an SSD for the reasons I gave above. The speedup in boot and program loading times is even more dramatic most of the time because most laptops use 5400rpm drives to conserve battery power and those are slower than the 7200rpm drives usually used in desktops. Laptop battery life also improves significantly when HDDs are replaced with SSDs.

    Frankly, you are one of about two or three people I've seen who have been disappointed with SSDs. The vast majority of people report that, having had a SSD, they will never be without one again.
    Last edited by Lady Fitzgerald; 06 Jul 2014 at 08:50. Reason: Senioritis.
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  8. Posts : 1,846
    Windows 7 Ultimate x64, & Mac OS X 10.9.2
       #8

    I would never build a pc for myself again without an SSD!

    dont listen to the negative folk! the difference is night and day!!

    as soon as you boot it up for the first time youll think youve got 64gb ram and a $700 processor upgrade!

    im such a convert im looking at completely ditching mechanical drives and even using an SSD for my mass storage!

    the price of a 240gb drive these days is under half if what I paid for my original 80gb version 4 years ago.

    its a well worthy investment, and not one you would regret. just use it and enjoy!
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  9. Posts : 2,410
    Windows 7 Professional 32-bit/Windows 8 64-bit/Win7 Pro64-bit
       #9

    Unless you have the bare minimums for running Windows 7 anyway, you should benefit at least a noticable increase in performance from upgrading to a SSD unless you do not use software that uses the storage often.
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  10. whs
    Posts : 26,210
    Vista, Windows7, Mint Mate, Zorin, Windows 8
       #10

    I own 7 SSDs - the oldest from 2008. One broke after more than 2 years of use. It was replaced by the manufacturer within 24 hours. Today's SSDs are more reliable than any HDD. They now have reliable controllers and any SSD should last longer than you care to keep it.

    I would not want to live without SSDs. Repalcing the HDD with a SSD is always the first action I take with a new laptop. For desktops I just add a small SSD (60GB) for the OS.

    Yes they are more expensive on a per GB basis than HDDs. But prices have come down considerably. My first 60GB OCZ cost as much as a 512GB SSD today.
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