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Windows 7: New Scam Alert: This is NOT Microsoft!

02 Jan 2017   #1
theMozer

 
New Scam Alert: This is NOT Microsoft!

I am ashamed to say I have fallen foul of an internet scam in the early hours of New Year's Day.

While doing some stuff on Facebook, I foolishly clicked on an article which claimed 'Donald Trump was being sued for divorce'! Within an instant, my computer was frozen, I had notices flashing across my screen, and a loud voice was yelling out at me that 'Microsoft had disabled my computer due to a virus attack'. I was prompted to call the displayed 'toll free' number for immediate assistance or else my computer would be permanently blocked!!! Unbelievably, half asleep and totally confused, I rang the number.

I was assured the virus attack was genuine and, for the next (heaven knows how long) I was guided through the steps to repair the damage. The 'Microsoft technician' gave her name and actually accessed my computer remotely to show me the damage on my system. I saw the word 'Trojan virus' displayed. When I suggested she could be a scammer, she assured me she was not - otherwise, how could she be taking me through these steps? She then asked what security I was using. I told her it was the free version of Avast which I'd had for the past 5 years or more with never a problem. She warned me it was of no use whatsoever and I needed to install a Pro version of security.

If I admit to being 'sold' Malwarebytes for the sum of (in British Pounds) almost 300, you'll probably say, idiot - serves her right. Don't forget, it was about 3 am on New Year's Day, and I had been out celebrating. I was dead on my feet and not fully aware of my actions.

To cut a long story short, I was the victim of the latest scam. They now have my credit card details and God knows what else. Yes, my computer was finally 'fixed' by them but I notice my login admin picture and password no longer appear on my screen. They are still on my Control Panel but I cannot get them back on login. How do I get this back?

I alerted my credit card issuer and they were extremely helpful. They blocked my card and will be sending out a new one. Once the withdrawal appears in my online account, I have to contact the fraud investigators and I'll be refunded.

Let this be a warning: Microsoft would NEVER disable your account! SCAM! SCAM! SCAM! If only I had known how to close that 'alert' screen - but my computer had been frozen. Other than to call me an idiot, your comments and suggestions would be highly appreciated.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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02 Jan 2017   #2
Layback Bear

Windows 7 Pro. 64/SP-1
 
 

I'm not sure why anybody would fall for that scam. Warnings have been all over the net for a very long time.

Things I recommend.
1. Change all passwords to everything. Using a known clean computer. Not the one the stranger has had access to.

2. Call all banks and credit card companies and explain what happened and why you are changing all passwords. They should give more guidance.

3. At that point if it was my computer, I would do a Clean Install because no one knows what else has been done or installed in the computer. Things like key loggers.

After the Clean Install and updating along with installing your security programs that computer should be up and running and ready to use.

Jack
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Jan 2017   #3
MoxieMomma

OEM Windows 7 Ult (x64) SP1
 
 

Hi:

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Layback Bear View Post
I'm not sure why anybody would fall for that scam. Warnings have been all over the net for a very long time.
Ouch!
That sounds a bit harsh towards the OP, que no?
I'm sure @theMozer already feels bad & stressed enough about the whole ordeal.
It was courageous to come forward for the benefit of others.

The bad guys are pretty good at "social engineering" these days.
No one, not even sophisticated computer users, is completely immune.
The OP is not the first or the last.

Having said all that, yes, I agree with @Layback Bear's advice.
If you need help with any of it, or if you need more resources about "safe hex", let us know.

Thanks,
MM
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02 Jan 2017   #4
HAVOC

Windows 7 Professional 64bit
 
 

Microsoft could care less if you get a virus.
I, like Layback Bear, can't understand how people fall for these scams. He is right, there have been warnings and it's also on the news.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Jan 2017   #5
dg1261

Windows 7/8.1/10/XP multiboot
 
 

Jack's recommendations are spot on. Once a Windows installation has been compromised, you can't clean it up and be 100% certain you got everything. Even if it seems like everything is clean, the next time Windows hiccups there will be that nagging worry in the back of your mind that maybe you didn't get everything. A clean install (or a restore of a known-good backup image) is the only way to really be sure.

As for lessons to be learned from this, perhaps the foremost is to never make critical decisions when you don't fully have your wits about you. That should go for everything in life, not just computers.

When all h*ll was breaking loose around you, you're only reaction should have been to simply yank the power cord out of the wall and go to bed. Sure, Windows won't like that, but at that point it's the lesser of two evils. Then come back to it when you have a clear head and can intelligently work through a resolution.
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02 Jan 2017   #6
Barman58

Windows 10 Pro x64 x2 Windows 10 Enterprise x64, Ubuntu
 
 

Ok please can we have a little more compassion for a New member who by inexperience or whatever has suffered from a quite traumatic event Yes this is a well known problem to those of us either in the business or enthusiasts, Not everyone is a knowledgable in the area of computer malware so should be treated with common courtesy
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Jan 2017   #7
Layback Bear

Windows 7 Pro. 64/SP-1
 
 

I surely didn't intend to show a lack of courtesy. I was just thinking with my keyboard.
My reasons for my keyboards words came form me. I have for years heard about these scams from T.V., radio, and all over the net, so I assumed everybody knew of these scams. Wrong assumption on my part. Hopefully this thread will help others but then again maybe not.

@ theMozer

I do apologize if my post offended you in any way.


That being done, please follow the recommendation that I posted.
If you have any questions, just ask. We are here to help and do it more politely than my post#2.

Let us know how things go for you, or if you need any help.

Jack
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Jan 2017   #8
HAVOC

Windows 7 Professional 64bit
 
 

Nor did I. I also thought that these scams were known to everyone.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Jan 2017   #9
Lady Fitzgerald

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Barman58 View Post
Ok please can we have a little more compassion for a New member who by inexperience or whatever has suffered from a quite traumatic event Yes this is a well known problem to those of us either in the business or enthusiasts, Not everyone is a knowledgable in the area of computer malware so should be treated with common courtesy
Thank you, Nigel!
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Jan 2017   #10
theMozer

 

What Barman58 has said is perfectly true. Yes, I was aware scams were about; what I wasn't aware of were the forms in which they manifested themselves. Obviously, what I shouldn't have done was click on an article which was fairly preposterous in the first place. I never click on stuff like this. Why I did it early on New Year's Day remains anyone's guess.

The fact is, this engulfed my screen and, in my confusion and shock, I panicked. Of course I should have forced a complete shut down, even if that's something one's never advised to do! I could see no way of doing anything else with that screen at the time it happened.

As I see it, my best way forward is to invest in a new laptop altogether. I hate the thought of Windows 10 and really need to source a new device with Windows 7 already installed. Unfortunately, Dell won't ship to the UK which is a shame as they still have brand new Windows 7 models with 8GB RAM and 1TB storage. I need to trust a device is actually brand new and I can trust in them!

Although I realise I have come across as a total idiot, this is far from how most people see me. As a result of this, I feel both violated and vulnerable - the very last thing I need in my life at the moment. The whole incident seems like a bad dream on reflection. I just cannot get to grips with the way I was 'guided through the repair process'. I wasn't even drunk, just over tired.

Anyway, how ever you view me, I'd just like to thank you all for your time and input. All the best, Mo
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 New Scam Alert: This is NOT Microsoft!




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