USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create

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    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create

    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create

    How to Create a Bootable Windows 7 Installation USB Flash Drive
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    Designer Media Ltd


    How to Create a Bootable Windows 7 Installation USB Flash Drive


       Information
    This will show you how to create a USB flash key drive that you can boot from to install Windows 7 with.
       Tip
    If the USB flash drive is of sufficient capacity, say 8GB, then after copying the Windows 7 installation DVD onto it, you can create a new folder (ex: Device Drivers) in the USB key and place all of your latest driver installation files in it. This way you will have them handy to manually install the drivers after installing Windows 7 from the USB key.
       Note
    If you booted from the USB drive to install Windows 7, then you may need to change the hard drive back to being listed before the USB key in the boot order in BIOS after the computer restarts during installation to prevent the computer from booting right back into the USB key starting the installation process over and over.
       Warning

    • The USB key needs to be at least 4 GB in size.
    • This will delete everything on the USB key. Be sure to save anything that you do not want to lose on it somewhere else.
    • Before installing Windows 7 from the USB key, you will need to:
      • Enable Legacy USB storage detect in the BIOS.
    • When ready to install Windows 7 from the USB key:
      • Connect the USB key.
      • Restart the computer, and keep tapping the F key (see screenshot below) responsible to open the Boot Menu screen for the brand and model of your motherboard or computer until it does.

        • USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-boot-menu.png
      • Select the USB key to boot from.
      • Start installing Windows 7.


    CONTENTS:
    • Option One: Use "Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool" to Create Bootable Windows 7 Installation USB
    • Option Two: Use "Rufus" to Create Bootable Windows 7 Installation USB
    • Option Three: Manually Create Bootable Windows 7 Installation USB Flash Drive






    OPTION ONE

    Use "Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool" to Create Bootable Windows 7 Installation USB



       Tip
    If you do not have a Windows 7 ISO file, then you can either download the latest ISO version at the links below.

    Microsoft Software Recovery

    Microsoft: Windows 7 Direct Download Links

    You could also use a free program like ImgBurn or ISODisk to create a ISO from your Windows 7 installation DVD.



    1. For how, see the Part 2 section here: Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool.





    OPTION TWO

    Use "Rufus" to Create Bootable Windows 7 Installation USB


    1. Download the latest version of Rufus at the link below, and save it's .exe file to your desktop.
       Note
    This is a standalone exe file that doesn't install anything to your PC.

    For Rufus FAQs, see: https://github.com/pbatard/rufus/wiki/FAQ


    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-download_rufus.jpg
    2. Connect your USB flash drive if you have not already.

    3. Run the rufus_v###.exe file, and click/tap on Yes if prompted by UAC.
    NOTE: ### = latest version number.

    4. Set Rufus with the settings below: (see screenshot below step 5)

    • [Under Device, select the USB flash drive you want to format and use.
    • Under Format Options, check Create a bootable disk using, click/tap on the browse icon to navigate to and select your 64-bit Windows 7 ISO file.
    • Under Partition scheme and target system type, select MBR partition scheme for BIOS or UEFI computers.
    • Under File system, select NTFS.
    • Under Cluster size, select the (Default) (ex: 16 kilobytes or 4096 bytes) it has listed.
    • Under Format Options, check Quick format.
    • Under Format Options, check Create extended label and icon files.
    • Under New volume label, you can enter any name you like for the USB flash drive, or leave the default name.

    5. When ready, click/tap on Start. (see screenshot below)
    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-rufus-1.jpg
    6. Click/tap on OK to confirm. (see screenshot below)
    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-rufus-2.jpg
    7. Rufus will now start creating the bootable UEFI USB flash drive. (see screenshot below)
    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-rufus-3.jpg
    8. When Rufus is "DONE", you can close Rufus. (see screenshot below)
    NOTE: It could take a little while to finish.
    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-rufus-4.jpg
    9. You are now ready to installWindows 7 with your bootable USB flash drive.





    OPTION THREE

    Manually Create Bootable Windows 7 Installation USB Flash Drive




       Warning
    Using this method:
    • You will only be able to create a 64-bit Windows 7 bootable USB flash drive if your current Windows 7 installation is also 64-bit.
    • You will be able to create a 32-bit Windows 7 bootable USB flash drive if your current Windows 7 installation is 32-bit or 64-bit.

    64-bit installation + 64-bit ISO = 64-bit flash drive
    64-bit installation + 32-bit ISO = 32-bit flash drive
    32-bit installation + 32-bit ISO = 32-bit flash drive
    32-bit installation + 64-bit ISO = unable to create

    1. Plug the USB key in.

    2. If AutoPlay opens a pop-up for the USB key, then just close it.
    NOTE: Make note of what the drive size is for the USB key for use in step 6 below. You can also open Computer (step 19) to see what the drive size is to. For example, mine is 3920 MB. (See screenshot below)
    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-computer.jpg
    3. Open an elevated command prompt.

    4. In the elevated command prompt, type diskpart and press Enter. (See screenshot below)
    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-step1.jpg
    5. In the elevated command prompt, type list disk and press Enter. (See screenshot below)
    NOTE: Make note of what disk # your USB key is listed as to use in step 6 below. You can also look for the drive size (step 2) of the USB key to help ID the disk number. For example, mine is listed as Disk 1 here for the 3920 MB disk.
    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-step2.jpg
    6. In the elevated command prompt, type select disk # (your USB disk #) and press Enter. (See screenshot below)
    NOTE: For example, my USB key is listed as Disk 1, so I would type select disk 1 and press Enter.
    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-step3.jpg
    7. In the elevated command prompt, type clean and press Enter. (See screenshot below)
    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-step4.jpg
    8. In the elevated command prompt, type create partition primary and press Enter. (See screenshot below)
    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-step5.jpg
    9. In the elevated command prompt, type select partition 1 and press Enter. (See screenshot below)
    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-step6.jpg
    10. In the elevated command prompt, type active and press Enter. (See screenshot below)
    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-step7.jpg
    11. In the elevated command prompt, type in the command below to format the USB as NTFS or FAT32, and press Enter. (See screenshot below)
    NOTE: This may take a few moments to finish formatting the USB key.

       Note
    You can substitute Windows 7 within quotes in the commands below with whatever name (drive label) you would like to have displayed for the USB drive instead.

    See also: Choosing between NTFS, FAT, and FAT32



    FAT32 volume labels
    • If you have an UEFI instead of BIOS motherboard, then you will need to use FAT32 and not NTFS.
    • Volume labels can contain as many as 11 characters and can include spaces but no tabs.
    • Volume labels cannot contain the following characters: ? / \ | . , ; : + = [ ] < > "
    • Volume labels are stored as uppercase regardless of whether they contain lowercase letters.
    NTFS volume labels

    • Volume labels can contain as many as 32 characters.

    format fs=ntfs label="Windows 7" quick

    OR

    format fs=fat32 label="Windows 7" quick

    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-step8.jpg
    12. If AutoPlay opens a pop-up for the USB key, then just close it.

    13. In the elevated command prompt, type assign and press Enter. (See screenshot below)
    NOTE: This will assign a new drive letter to the USB key. Make note of the new USB drive letter to use in step 22 below. For example, mine is now H.
    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-step9.jpg
    14. If AutoPlay opens a pop-up for the USB key, then just close it.

    15. In the elevated command prompt, type exit and press Enter. (See screenshot below)
    NOTE: This will exit you from DiskPart from step 4.
    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-step10.jpg
    16. Close the elevated command prompt.

    17. Insert your Windows 7 installation DVD into the DVD drive.

    18. If AutoPlay opens a pop-up for the Windows 7 installation DVD, then just close it.

    19. Open the Start Menu, right click on the Computer button, and click on Open.

    20. Right click on the DVD drive (ex: E: ) that has the Windows 7 installation DVD in it, and click on Open. (See screenshot below)
    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-open.jpg
    21. Highlight all of the contents, right click on the highlighted contents, and click on Copy. (See screenshot below)
    NOTE: You will need to copy all of the files and folders on the Windows 7 installation DVD to the USB key.
    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-copy.jpg
    22. Go back to Computer, right click on the USB key drive (ex: H ), and click on Paste. (See screenshot below)
    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-paste.jpg
    23. The contents of the Windows 7 installation DVD will now start copying over to the USB key. (See screenshot below)
    NOTE: This may take a few moments to complete.
    USB Windows 7 Installation Key Drive - Create-copying.jpg
    24. When finished, you can close the Computer window and unplug the USB key.

    25. You now have a Windows 7 Installation USB key.

       Warning
    If you have UEFI instead of BIOS motherboard, then you will need to temporarily disable Secure Boot to use the USB to install Windows. After installation is complete, you can enable Secure Boot again.
    That's it,
    Shawn







  1. Posts : 2
    Vista(Soon to be Win7)
       #1

    Thanks for the great guide but I have a slight problem. I have downloaded the 64bit version of Win7 but am currently running 32bit vista.
    Would I be able to download the 64bit version of the vista repair disk and use diskpart within the cmd line of the disk to run all the commands and then just copy the files across using 32bit vista?
      My Computer


  2. Posts : 70,194
    64-bit Windows 10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #2

    Hello Gaming Warrior, and welcome to Seven Forums.

    Using this method:
    • You can only create a 64-bit Windows 7 bootable USB flash drive if your current Windows 7 installation is also 64-bit.
    • You can create a 32-bit Windows 7 bootable USB flash drive if your current Windows 7 installation is 32-bit or 64-bit
    Shawn
    Last edited by Brink; 04 May 2011 at 14:13. Reason: updated
      My Computer


  3. Posts : 415
    W8 Pro, W7 Ultimate, XP Pro x64, Vista x64, Ubuntu
       #3

    Regarding your x86 v. x64 warning...


    Brink,
    In preparation of installing to my Mini 9, I just installed Windows 7 x86 to a USB key using my x64 desktop. Afterwards, I tried booting the desktop to it and it appeared to go. I went as far as Install Now/Accept License/Custom(Advanced) Install/Drive Options. Obviously, I didn't actually install it but it DID get that far with a 32-bit USB key created on a 64-bit system. I'll know for sure when I actually have the Mini in hand and get a round tuit (I used to have a round tuit on my desk but can't find it...LOL).
      My Computer


  4. Posts : 70,194
    64-bit Windows 10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #4

    Hello Zrtom,

    I had only placed that warning there as a precaution since a lot of people were unable to create a 64-bit USB while using a 32-bit OS, and the other way around.

    Some people get lucky and have no problems either way though.

    Thank you for posting your results. I'm happy to hear that you are one of the lucky ones. :)

    Shawn
      My Computer


  5. Posts : 1,009
    Windows 7 RC 7100 32bit/64bit
       #5

    Hello Brink..

    I just wanted to point out that the E:\boot\bootsect.exe /nt60 H: part is not necessary, cause since you copy the whole dvd contents the bootmgr file is included,so after you've made the partition active from diskpart, all you need is to copy the source files, boots just fine.

    So perhaps you might want to skip this step as it might cause troubles if they make a mistake with the target letter...
      My Computer


  6. Posts : 415
    W8 Pro, W7 Ultimate, XP Pro x64, Vista x64, Ubuntu
       #6

    limneos,

    I rather doubt it, but do you think by doing the E:\boot\bootsect.exe /nt60 H:
    that would explain why the boot screen on my Mini 9 is the Vista-style green bar? Or is that a known functionality with SSD drives? (Only the Mini 9 uses the Vista-type boot screen, all the other (non-SSD) laptops and desktops use the normal Windows 7 boot screen).

    Tom
      My Computer


  7. Posts : 1,009
    Windows 7 RC 7100 32bit/64bit
       #7

    Hello zrtom.

    It has nothing to do with your drives.
    This happens to most of the mini netbooks because of the screen resolution.

    In order for the new windows logo to appear, you need to have a supported native resolution of 1024x768 and above.
    Your netbook probably has 1024x600 like most of them, in which it does not display the new logo but the old vista bar.
    I was frustrated to see that to my netbook too, but this is the case, no fixes yet.

    Hope it helps
      My Computer


  8. Posts : 415
    W8 Pro, W7 Ultimate, XP Pro x64, Vista x64, Ubuntu
       #8

    limneos said:
    Hello zrtom.

    It has nothing to do with your drives.
    This happens to most of the mini netbooks because of the screen resolution.

    In order for the new windows logo to appear, you need to have a supported native resolution of 1024x768 and above.
    Your netbook probably has 1024x600 like most of them, in which it does not display the new logo but the old vista bar.
    I was frustrated to see that to my netbook too, but this is the case, no fixes yet.

    Hope it helps
    Yes, it helps alot. I thought it might be due to the SSD or perhaps screen resolution after reading the Windows 7 boot-screen blog a couple days ago. I've searched on this (but not dutifully) and haven't found much. I'm guessing that explains the resume-from-hibernate white bar too. Thanks for the help.
    Tom
      My Computer


  9. Posts : 70,194
    64-bit Windows 10 Pro
    Thread Starter
       #9

    limneos said:
    Hello Brink..

    I just wanted to point out that the E:\boot\bootsect.exe /nt60 H: part is not necessary, cause since you copy the whole dvd contents the bootmgr file is included,so after you've made the partition active from diskpart, all you need is to copy the source files, boots just fine.

    So perhaps you might want to skip this step as it might cause troubles if they make a mistake with the target letter...
    Hi Limneos,

    It was added as a backup precaution to make sure that the USB boot file was correct so that it would boot to it at startup. :)
      My Computer


 
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